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Appendixes

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Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members RICHARD A. MESERVE is a parader in the Washington law firm of Covington ~ Bulling. He holds both a law degree from Harvard Law School and a Ph.D. degree in applied physics from Stanford University, where he did postdoctoral work on the theoretical properties of paramagnets and techniques to calculate molecular properties. In 1976, he was a clerk for Supreme Court Justice Harry A. Blackmun, and in 1977 he was appointed Legal Counsel and Senior Policy Analyst in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). At OSTP he helped develop policies designed to promote the technological advance of American industry and conducted reviews of energy technology issues. In addition, he served as executive director of an interagency committee concerned with nuclear power plant safety. Mr. Meserve has been a member of several study committees of the National Research Council, including the Panel to Study the Impact of National Security Controls on International Technology Transfer. Recently, he served as chairman of the National Research Council Committee to Assess Safety and Technical Issues at DOE Reactors. RONALD L. ATKINS is head of the Chemistry Division of the Research Deparunent of the Naval Weapons Center at China Lake, California. His division conducts research and development across a bmad spectrum of scientific disciplines focused on materials science. He received a Ph.D. degree in organic chemistry from the University of New Hampshire. Dr. Atkins' research expertise is in the synthesis and characterization of highly energetic materials for explosive' propellant, and pyrotechnique applications. FIe also has conducted research in 95

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96 APPEND[X A high-density materials synthesist high-energy laser dye synthesis, and alternative synthetic fuel development. ALBERT CARNESALE is professor of public policy and academic dean, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University. His expertise is in nuclear energy policy and nuclear weapons policy. He has worked as a scientist with the U.S. Anns Control and Disarmament Agency and served as an adviser to the U.S. delegation to the Strategic Ann S Limitation Talks. He was head of the U.S. delegation to the Intemational Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation and served on the National Research Council's Board of Radioactive Waste Management. He is a member of the American Nuclear Society. He holds a Ph.D. degree in nuclear engineering from North Carolina State University. JESS M. CLEVELAND is chief of the Transuranium Research Project of the U.S. Geological Survey. His current research focuses on the environmental chemistry of the transuranium elements, especially plutonium. He has been employed both at Rocky Flats and Hanford Laboratories (now Pacific Northwest Laboratories); in the course of 35 years of experience in plutonium chemistry, he has investigated its analysis, processing, fundamental chemical properties and environmental behavior and is author or co-author of over 30 scientific papers on the subject. He is author of the book The Chemistry of Plutonium and coauthor of The Plutonium Handbook. He was a member of the National Research Council's Transplutonium Working Group and has served on the program review committee of the Earth Sciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. He holds a Ph.D. degree in inorganic chemistry from the University of Colorado. DAVID G. HOEL is the director of the Division of Biometry and Risk Assessment, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health. He received his Ph.D. degree in statistics from the University of North Carolina. His research is focused on the quantification of human health risks using molecular., toxicological, and epidemiological data, with particular interests in radiation. He has served as an associate director at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) in Hiroshima, and is currently a member of the BEIR V Committee of the National Research Council on ionizing radiation. Dr. Hoel has been active as a member of international and U.S. government advisory committees including the Office of Science Technology Policy's Committee on Cancer Policy. He is currently a member of the Council of Fellows of the Collegium Ramazzini and is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences. GEORGE M. HORNBERGER is a professor in the Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Virginia. His research focuses on hydrological processes, particularly as they affect the transport of solutes and

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APPENDIX A 97 pariiculates through soils and rocks. He serves on the Board of Radioactive Waste Management of the National Research Council. He received a Ph.D. degree in hydrology from Stanford University. PAUL KOTIN is currently a consultant on pathology and adjunct professor of pathology, University of Colorado Medical School. Formerly, he was senior vice president for health, safety, and environment at the Johns-Manville Corporation. Previous to that he served at Temple University as dean of the school of medicine and vice president for health sciences. He is also a former director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences and scientific director for Etiology, National Cancer Institute. His work focuses on the mechanisms of carcinogenesis and on environmental factors relating to cancer. He is the recipient of the Knudsen Award from the American Occupational Medicine Association, was the Gehrmann Lecturer for the American Academy of Occupational Medicine, and was recipient of the Distinguished Service Medal of the Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare. He is a fellow of the College of American Pathologists and a member of the American Association of Cancer Researchers and the American Association of Pathologists and Bacteriologists. DENNIS J. KUBICKI is a fire protection engineer in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. He is responsible for reviewing fire protection programs at nuclear power plants and determining their degree of conformance with Nuclear Regulatory Commission guidelines and requirements. Previously, he was assistant manager for Industrial and Fire Safety in the Safety Office of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. He has extensive experience in evaluating fire promotion for buildings, residences, institutions, and municipalities. He is a member of the National Fire Protection Association, the Society of Fire Protection Engineers, and the American Society of Safety Engineers. He holds an M.S. degree in safety from the University of Southern California (Eastern Division) and a master's degree in business administration from the University of Maryland. J. CARSON MARK has retired from his position as leader of the Theoretical Division of Los Alamos National Laboratory. His research is involved with group theory, transport theory, hydrodynamics, and neuron physics. He has served on the Science Advisory Board of the U.S. Air Force, and was a member of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards. He is a member of the American Physical Society and the American Mathematical Society. MICHAEL R. OVERCASH is a professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering and also in the Biological and Agricultural Engineering Department at North Carolina State University. He is also center director of the large

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98 APPE:JiJDIX A Research Center for Waste Minimization and Management of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. His work is focused on fundamental process changes to reduce waste generation and chemical loss Ed the evaluation and disposal of toxic wastes, including site remediaiion. He manages a significant research group In terrestrial effects of industrial organic compounds, including greenhouse studies on plant response and soil fate of chemicals. He has served on many scientific and governmental panels on these and related topics. He was recently a member of the North Carolina Go~rernor's Waste Management Boat and has drafted guidelines for sludge land treatment in Delaware. His testimony before the congressional Committee of Science and Technology explored the reasons why technologies available for eliminating or treating handout wastes have not had an impact on landfill usage in the United States. In 1986 he was awarded the Environmental Protection Agency Distinguished Scientist Award. He is a member of He American Institute of Engineers and the Institution of Chemical Engineers, London. WOLFGANG K.H. PANOFSKY is currently director and professor emeritus at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). He was director of SLAC from 1961 to 1984 and prior to that was director of He High Energy Physics Laboratory at Stanford University. He has served with many working groups and commissions, including the President's Science Advisory Committee and the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics. He has received the E.O. Lawrence Award (1961), the California Scientist of the Year Award (1967), the National Medal of Science (1969), and the Franklin Institute Award (1970) and is also the recipient of the Enrico Fenni Award (1979~. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and is a fellow of the American Physical Society. RICHARD L. SAGER, JR., is loss prevention manager at the Lithium CoIporation of America in Gastonia, Norm Carolina. He is responsible for overall guidance of the Corporal Safety Program, including staffing and overseeing the Health Services Department, ensuring that all four company facilities are in compliance wills corporate and federal safety regulations, and coordinating the Industrial Hygiene Program to establish baselines. Previously9 he was supervisor for safety and environmental engineering for several mining and ore processing companies. He has extensive experience with the regulations of both the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and the Mining Safety and Health Administration. He holds a B.S. degree in mechanical engineering from Vanderbilt University. He is a member of the American Society of Safety Engineers and serves on the Executive Committee of the Metals Section of the National Safety Council.

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APPENDIX A 99 RICHARD B. SETLOW is associate director for life sciences and was former chairman of the Biology Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. His work in molecular biophysics has studied the effect of ultraviolet and ionizing radiations on proteins, viruses, and cells. lIis research includes studies of nucleic acids and their repair mechanisms, as well as studies on environmental carcinogenesis. He received the Finsen Medal in 1980 and the Enrico Fermi Award in 19BX. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He received a Ph.D. in physics from Yale University. DAVID R. SMITH has recently retired from his position as leader of the Criticality Safety Group in the Health Division at Los Alamos National Laboratory. He has served as consultant on criticality reviews at many facilities, including Argonne, Oak Ridge, and Hanford. He has a long involvement with developing and maintaining national and international safety standards for the handling, processing, and storing of fissile material, working with the American Nuclear Agency Technical Committee on Criticality A~lann Systems. He is a fellow of the American Nuclear Society. STEWART W. SMITH is currently on leave from the University of Washington to serve as president of the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology, a S8-member consortium of U.S. universities that is developing new global and portable seismographic networks with the support of the U.S. National Science Foundation. At the University of Washington he served as professor and chairman of geophysics from 1970 to 1980, and is presently professor of geophysics and adjunct professor of geological sciences. His research areas include seismicity, tectonics, and earthquake hazards. He has published widely in these fields and served on numerous scientific and governmental panels concerning these topics. One such recent assignment was as chairman of a workshop for the congressional Office of Technology Assessment concerning the seismic verification of nuclear testing treaties. He has had extensive experience in the siting of commercial nuclear power plants and other important structures in ear~quake-prone regions. JOHN E. TILL is president of Radiological Assessments Corporation, located in Neeses, S.C. He is also president and owner of the Embeford Dairy Farm. His expertise is in the assessment of radionuclide releases to the environment. Major fields of interest are the development and implementation of accurate and reliable environmental monitoring programs and the consolidation of current radiological assessment methods to provide a concise evaluation of models and their ranges of applicability. He has received the Elda E. Anderson Award of the Health Physics Society and has served on the Executive Committee Science Advisory Board of

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100 APPE7JDIX ~ the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. He is a consultant ~ the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Committee on Reactor Safeguands and a member of the National Cancer Institute Committee on Assessment of Dose due to Fallout Radioiodine. He holds a Ph.D. degree in nuclear engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology. VICTORIA J. TSCHINKEL is senior consultant with the law firm of Islanders, Parsons, and Uhlfelder in Tallahassee, Fla. Previously, she was secretary of the Florida Department of Environmental Regulation. She was ins~nental in rewriting Flonda's water quality standards and in revising the state's groundwater protection rules. She has served on the DOE Energy Research Advisory Board and on an U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Panel on toxic pollution and is currently a member of the DOE Advisory Committee on Nuclear Facility Safety. She received an A.B. degree in zoology from the University of California, Berkeley. F. WARD WHICKER is a professor in the Deponent of Radiology and Radiation Biology, Colorado State University. His areas of expertise include the transport of radionuclides through aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems and the effects of radiation on plant and animal communities. He has been active in the development of computer simulation models for pathway analysis and dose assessment He spent one recent sabbatical year as adjunct senior ecologist at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. He has served as consultant and committee member for many industrial and governmental studies. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a member of the Health Physics Society and the Ecological Society of America WILLIAM L. WHI11AKER is director and senior research scientist of the Field Robotics Center of the Robotics Institute at Carnegie-Mellon University. His research focuses on the development of robots for many diverse applications, including reconnaissance and cleanup in nuclear environments, hazardous waste management, planetary exploration, automated mining, autonomous haulage, and automated excavation of buried pipes. His work on teleoperator transporters for radiological emergency response and recovery found direct use in remote systems for recovery of the reactor basement at Three Mile Island. For his robotics work he has received the Science Digest Top 100 U.S. Innovators Award. He holds a Ph.D. degree in civil engineering from Carnegie-Mellon University. GEROLD YONAS is president of Titan Technologies, located in San Diego. Previously he was Chief Scientist and Acting Deputy Director of the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO). Before joining SDIO he was Director of Pulsed Power Sciences at Sandia National Laboratories. His worlc at Sandia was involved win intense electron and ion beams, high power microwaves, lasers,

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APPENDIX A 101 high density plasma, radiation sources, and energy conversion devices. Dr. Yonas is a recipient of the Secrecy of Defense Medal for Outstanding Public Service. He is a fellow of Me American Physical Society, a member of the American Astute of Aeronautics and Asuenaubcs, and has served on the executive Board of Be controlled Nuclear Fusion Division of the American Nuclear Society. Dr. Yonas resigned from the committee in May 1989 when he returned to managerial responsibilities within Sandia, which was one of the facilities covered by this study.