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Appendix E Illustrative Programs Aimed at Increasing Participation in the Mathematical Sciences by Women and Underrepresented Minorities PROGRAMS AIMED AT K-12 FEMALES All Girls/All Math (http://www.math.unl.edu/programs/agam/) The University of Nebraska-Lincoln offers a weeklong summer camp for high school girls who are interested in exploring mathematical topics that are outside the scope of the typical high school curriculum. Participants take a one-week course and attend lectures on other exciting topics in the mathematical sciences. The camp is structured so that the participants are taught by female mathematics professors and chaperoned by female mathematics graduate students. There is also a keynote presentation by a prominent female mathematician. Sonia Kovalevsky High School Mathematics Days (http://sites.google.com/site/awmmath/programs/kovalevsky-days) The Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM) supports Sonia Kovalevsky High School and Middle School Mathematics Days by provid- ing grants up to $3,000 to colleges and universities nationwide. This pro- gram, which is currently supported by a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF), consists of a program of workshops, talks, and problem- solving competitions for female high school or middle school students and their teachers. The purpose of Sonia Kovalevsky Days is to “encourage young women to continue their study of mathematics, to assist them with 190

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APPENDIX E 191 the sometimes difficult transitions between middle school and high school mathematics and between high school and college mathematics, to assist the teachers of women mathematics students, and to encourage colleges and universities to develop more extensive cooperation with middle schools and high schools in their area.” Tensor Women and Mathematics Grants (http://www.maa.org/wam/tensor.html) The Mathematics Association of America awards grants of up to $6,000 to college or university and secondary mathematics faculty for projects designed to encourage college and university women or high school and middle school girls to study mathematics. This program, funded by the Tensor Foundation, supports activities such as the following: • Organizing a club for women interested in mathematics or math- ematics and science; • Creating a network of women professional mentors who will direct mathematics projects for girls; • Holding a conference for counselors to prepare them to encourage women and girls to continue to study mathematics; • Conducting a summer mathematics program for high school women; • Bringing high school women onto a college campus for a “math day” with follow-up; • Structuring a program for high school and/or college women to mentor younger female mathematics students with math projects or math clubs; • Forming partnerships with industry to acquaint women students with real-life applications of mathematics; and • Providing funds toward release time to allow a faculty member to prepare a course on women and mathematics, provided the host institution agrees to offer such a course. PROGRAMS AIMED AT UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE FEMALE STUDENTS Alice T. Schafer Prize (http://sites.google.com/site/awmmath/programs/schafer-prize) The Alice T. Schafer Mathematics Prize of the Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM) is awarded to an undergraduate woman residing in the United States for excellence in mathematics.

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192 APPENDIX E AWM Student Chapters (http://sites.google.com/site/awmmath/programs/student-chapters) AWM student chapters hold regular meetings and events open to all undergraduate and graduate students, regardless of major or gender. These meetings and activities allow students to be exposed to the world of profes- sional mathematics, to obtain information about the varied career options in mathematics, to network with professional mathematicians, and to de- velop leadership skills. Activities for student chapters include sponsoring a lecture series by either students or local mathematicians, site visits to major employers of mathematicians, outreach through activities such as tutor- ing, social gatherings such as picnics or banquets, mentoring programs for youth, and special events such as career days. Workshops for Women Graduate Students and Postdoctoral Mathematicians (http://sites.google.com/site/awmmath/programs/workshops) AWM holds a series of workshops for women graduate students and recent Ph.D.s in conjunction with major mathematics meetings. These workshops consist of a graduate student poster session, presentations by recent Ph.D.s, mentoring events, and career symposia. Workshop partici- pants have the opportunity to meet with other women mathematicians at all stages of their careers. Travel Grants for Women Researchers (http://sites.google.com/site/awmmath/programs/travel-grants) AWM administers travel grants for women to support attendance at research conferences and longer-term visits with a mentor. The purpose of the travel grants is to enhance the research activities of women mathemati- cians and increase their visibility in various research venues. Mentoring Travel Grants for Women (http://sites.google.com/site/awmmath/programs/ travel-grants/mathematics-mentoring-travel-grants) AWM provides mathematics mentoring travel grants to help junior women to develop long-term working and mentoring relationships with senior mathematicians. This relationship should help the junior mathemati- cian to establish her research program and eventually receive tenure. Each grant funds travel, accommodations, and other required expenses for an untenured woman mathematician to travel to an institute or a department to do research with a specified individual for one month. The research areas

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APPENDIX E 193 of both the applicant and the mentor must be in a field that is supported by NSF/Division of Mathematical Sciences. PROGRAMS AIMED AT K-12 UNDERREPRESENTED MINORITIES Joaquin Bustoz Math-Science Honors Program (http://mshp.asu.edu/) Arizona State University (ASU) runs an intense academic program that provides an opportunity for underrepresented minority students to begin uni- versity mathematics and science studies before graduating from high school. All expenses are paid by ASU and participants live on the ASU Tempe campus while enrolled in a university-level mathematics course for college credit. Louisiana Preparatory (LaPREP) Program (http://www.lsus.edu/offices-and-services/ community-outreach/laprep-program) LaPREP is a two-summer enrichment program that identifies, encour- ages, and instructs competent middle and early high school students, pre- paring them to complete a college degree program in math, science, or engineering. Participants attend 7 weeks of intellectually demanding classes and seminars, with emphasis on abstract reasoning, problem solving, and technical writing skills interspersed with field trips to local industries. Some of the mathematical topics studied over two summer sessions include logic, algebraic structures, and probability and statistics. Mathematics, Engineering, Science Achievement (MESA) Program (http://mesa.ucop.edu/) The MESA program serves African-American, American-Indian, M ­ exican-American, and other Latino-Americans in California who have been historically underrepresented in mathematics-based fields. MESA, which is funded by the University of California at Berkeley and the C ­ alifornia State University (CSU) Chancellor’s Office, offers activities such as field trips and enrichment classes for junior high and high school stu- dents. Each year there is a MESA day, when a science olympiad is held. Mathematics Intensive Summer Session (MISS) (http://www.fullerton.edu/sa/miss/) MISS, a 4-week commuter program held during the summer at C ­ alifornia State University at Fullerton, is designed to help female minority

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194 APPENDIX E high school students be successful in their college preparatory mathemat- ics classes. Participants learn about topics in Algebra II as preparation for taking Algebra II or integrated Math III when they return to school in the fall. All expenses are paid by the California State University at Fullerton. Tensor-SUMMA Grants: Strengthening Underrepresented Minority Mathematics Achievement (http://www.fullerton.edu/sa/miss/) The Mathematical Association of America awards up to $6,000 to college and university mathematical science faculty and departments for programs designed to encourage the pursuit and enjoyment of mathematics among students in middle school, high school, or beginning in college from groups traditionally underrepresented in the field of mathematics. This pro- gram, funded by the Tensor Foundation, supports activities such as prepara- tion for competitions within the mathematical sciences, math circles, student group and individual research experiences, summer mathe­ atics camp, and m math club activities. The Texas Prefreshman Engineering Program (http://www.prep-usa.org/portal/texprep/) The Texas Prefreshman Engineering Program (TexPrep) identifies achieving middle and high school students with an interest in engineering, science, technology, and other mathematics-related areas and strengthens their potential for careers in these fields. TexPREP is a collaborative effort of colleges and universities throughout Texas that encourages students to begin preparing early for scientific and engineering career paths in school. Women and members of minority groups traditionally underrepresented in these areas continue to be target groups. PROGRAMS AND ORGANIZATIONS AIMED AT UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE STUDENTS FROM UNDERREPRESENTED MINORITIES California State University Alliance for Minority Participation Project (http://students.ucsd.edu/academics/research/ undergraduate-research/opportunities/camp.html) Many California state universities and partnering community colleges have a CSU-AMP program aimed at increasing the number of bachelor’s degree recipients in science, engineering, and mathematics among histori- cally underrepresented groups in these fields. CSU-AMP involves students

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APPENDIX E 195 in science, engineering, and mathematics enrichment activities throughout their entire undergraduate careers. While programs vary from campus to c ­ ampus, students often receive two summers of intensive work in math- ematics, academic-year workshops that support their mathematics and science courses, and research internships. This program is sponsored by the NSF. California Alliance for Minority Participation Many University of California campuses have California Alliance for Minority Participation (CAMP) programs that offer support and advance- ment opportunities to underrepresented students seeking bachelor’s degrees in chemistry, engineering, mathematics, physics, or other sciences. CAMP participants can take advantage of events and services designed to meet the needs of a culturally and intellectually diverse group of students. Some CAMP activities include workshops, research projects, meetings with fac- ulty, and scholarships. Participants must be a member of an underserved minority (African-American, Chicano, Latino, Native American, or Pacific Islander) and majoring in chemistry, engineering, mathematics, physics, or other sciences. RESOURCES FOR FEMALE FACULTY MEMBERS • Ruth I. Michler Memorial Prize (http://sites.google.com/site/ awmmath/programs/michler-prize), • Travel grants for women researchers (http://sites.google.com/site/ awmmath/programs/travel-grants), and • Mentoring travel grants for women (http://sites. google.com/site/awmmath/programs/travel-grants/ mathematics-mentoring-travel-grants). OTHER RESOURCES TO ENCOURAGE WOMEN IN THE MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES • Organizing meetings in cooperation with AWM (http://sites. google.com/site/awmmath/in-cooperation-with), • Humphreys Award  (http://sites.google.com/site/awmmath/ programs/humphreys-award), • Louise Hay Award (http://sites.google.com/site/awmmath/ programs/hay-award), • Noether Lectures (http://sites.google.com/site/awmmath/ programs/noether-lectures),

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196 APPENDIX E • Falconer Lectures (http://sites.google.com/site/awmmath/ programs/falconer-lectures), • Kovalevsky Lectures (http://sites.google.com/site/awmmath/ programs/kovalevsky-lectures), • Teacher partnership (http://sites.google.com/site/awmmath/­ programs/teacher-partnership), and • Mentor network (http://sites.google.com/site/awmmath/programs/ mentor-network).