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APPENDIX E Biographical Sketches of Committee Members HERMAN BOUWER (Chairman) received his Ph.D. in agricultural engineering (soil and water management) in 1955 from Cornell University. He is currently the director of the USDA Water Conservation Laboratory and an adjunct professor, Arizona State University and University of Arizona (teaching semester courses in ground water hydrology, supervising graduate dissertation projects, giving lectures and seminars). As laboratory director, he directs a research program consisting of development of efficient irrigation systems, water measurement, irrigation scheduling, remote sensing of crop stress and evapotranspiration, ground water recharge, ground water quality protection, and other projects on conserving water and its,quality. ROBERT E. BECK is a professor of law at Southern Illinois University, Carbondale. He received his LL.B. from the University of Minnesota in 1960 and his LL.M. from New York University in 1966. His expertise is natural resource law and he specializes in oil and gas, coal mining, and water resources. Dr. Beck has received several honors and awards, including the Chester Fritz Distinguished Professorship in 1975 and the Order of the Coif in 1960. -156-

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-157- CORALE L. BRIERLEY obtained her Ph.D. from the University of Texas, Dallas in 1981. She is presently a consultant at VistaTech in Salt Lake City, Utah. Her research interests include biogenic extractive metallurgy, biological treatment methods for inorganic wastes, thermophilic chemautotrophic microorganisms, and reclamation of solid mine waste. Dr. Brierley is a member of the Society for Mining, Metallurgy and Exploration, and the Society for Industrial Microbiology. C. THOMAS HAAN acquired his Ph.D. (1967) from Iowa State University in agricultural engineering. Dr. Haan is a Regents Professor and Sarkeys Distinguished Professor of agricultural engineering at Oklahoma State University. His research is in the areas of mathematical, statistical, and empirical models of various phases of the hydrologic cycle; and hydrology of agricultural, surface-mined, and forest lands. Dr. Haan is a Registered Professional Engineer, a fellow of the American Society of Agricultural Engineer, and a member of the American Institute of Hydrology. GEORGE M. HORNBERGER obtained his Ph.D. from Stanford University (hydrology) in 1970. He also holds a bachelors (1965) and masters (1967) in civil engineering from Drexel University. As a professor at the University of Virginia, his current research interests include modeling of environmental systems with uncertainty, the hydrogeochemical response of small catchments. water quality modeling, and ground water and lake interaction. Dr. Hornberger is a member of the American Geophysical Union, the American Geological Institute, and Sigma Xi. He is also a member of the WSTB Committee on USGS Water Resources Research and other NRC committees.

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-158- ROBERT J. LUXMOORE has been at Oak Ridge National Laboratory since 1973 as a soil and plant scientist. He obtained his Ph.D. in soil physics (1969) from the University of California, Riverside. He specializes in areas of experimental and computer modeling research on relationships between environmental variables and whole-plant physiological processes, including disruptions induced by pollutant stress and soil variability effects on hydrologic transport. Dr. Luxmoore is a member of the American Geophysical Union and a fellow of the Soil Science Society of America. JOHN C. SENCINDIVER received his Ph.D. in agronomy and soil science in 1977 from West Virginia UniversitY. _ ~ He is currently a processor of soil science at West Virginia University. His research interests lie in soil genesis and classification, overburden and minesoil properties, surface mine reclamation, and the impacts of surface mining on ground water recharge and quality. Dr. Sencindiver is a member of the American Society for Surface Mining and Reclamation, of the Soil Science Society of America, and of various other organizations. JAMES R. WALLIS received his B.S. in forestry from the University of New Brunswick in 1950, an M.S. from Oregon State University in 1954, and a Ph.D. in soil morphology from the University of California, Berkeley in 1965. Currently he is a research staff member at the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, where he has been since 1967. His principal interests are in mathematical models applied to hydrology, soils, forestry, and land management. Dr. Wallis is a member of the Water Science and Technology Board. WILLIAM W. WOESSNER is an associate professor of hydrogeology at the University of Montana, Missoula. He holds a Ph.D. in geology (hydrogeology), minor in civil and environmental engineering, from the University of Wisconsin,

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-159 Madison. He teaches and conducts research on basi and applied hydrogeology topics. He has assessed coal hydrology and mining impacts in Montana and was a member of the NRC's Committee on Coal Mining and Ground Water Resources in the United States. .c

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