C
Committee Biographies

ALVIN R. TARLOV (Chair) received his bachelor's degree from Dartmouth College and his medical degree from the University of Chicago. Following his internship and residency in internal medicine, he spent five years in hematologic research, partly at the University of Chicago and partly in the Department of Biological Chemistry at Harvard Medical School. In 1968, Dr. Tarlov became professor and chairman of the Department of Medicine at the University of Chicago, a post he held for thirteen years. In 1975, he began a five-year term as chairman of the Task Force on Manpower Needs of the Association of Professors of Medicine, and in 1978, he was appointed chairman of the Graduate Medical Education National Advisory Committee to advise the Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare on desirable numbers, distributions, and geographic placements of physicians in each specialty. The committee's final report which was issued on September 30, 1980, is the standard reference on physician manpower needs in the United States.

Dr. Tarlov is a former Markle Foundation Scholar and Research Career Development Awardee of the National Institutes of Health. He has served as secretary-treasurer and president of the Association of Professors of Medicine and as chairman of the Federated Council of Internal Medicine. He is a member of the Association of American Physicians and of the Institute of Medicine. He is also a member of the U.S. General Accounting Office Research and Education Advisory Panel and is a Master of the American College of Physicians. In January 1984, he became president of the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation in Menlo Park, California, and guided the foundation to a national leadership role in health promotion and disease prevention, until assuming his current positions in October 1990 as Director, Division of Health Improvement, The Health Institute, New England Medical Center; professor of medicine, Tufts University



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Disability in America: Toward a National Agenda for Prevention C Committee Biographies ALVIN R. TARLOV (Chair) received his bachelor's degree from Dartmouth College and his medical degree from the University of Chicago. Following his internship and residency in internal medicine, he spent five years in hematologic research, partly at the University of Chicago and partly in the Department of Biological Chemistry at Harvard Medical School. In 1968, Dr. Tarlov became professor and chairman of the Department of Medicine at the University of Chicago, a post he held for thirteen years. In 1975, he began a five-year term as chairman of the Task Force on Manpower Needs of the Association of Professors of Medicine, and in 1978, he was appointed chairman of the Graduate Medical Education National Advisory Committee to advise the Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare on desirable numbers, distributions, and geographic placements of physicians in each specialty. The committee's final report which was issued on September 30, 1980, is the standard reference on physician manpower needs in the United States. Dr. Tarlov is a former Markle Foundation Scholar and Research Career Development Awardee of the National Institutes of Health. He has served as secretary-treasurer and president of the Association of Professors of Medicine and as chairman of the Federated Council of Internal Medicine. He is a member of the Association of American Physicians and of the Institute of Medicine. He is also a member of the U.S. General Accounting Office Research and Education Advisory Panel and is a Master of the American College of Physicians. In January 1984, he became president of the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation in Menlo Park, California, and guided the foundation to a national leadership role in health promotion and disease prevention, until assuming his current positions in October 1990 as Director, Division of Health Improvement, The Health Institute, New England Medical Center; professor of medicine, Tufts University

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Disability in America: Toward a National Agenda for Prevention School of Medicine; and professor of health promotion at Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. HENRY A. ANDERSON is chief of Environmental and Chronic Disease Epidemiology for the Wisconsin Department of Health and Social Services, as well as adjunct professor of preventive medicine at the University of Wisconsin Medical School with a joint appointment in the Institute for Environmental Studies. He received his M.D. from the University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, and is a diplomate of the American Board of Preventive Medicine with an occupational medicine subspecialty. He is also a fellow of the American College of Epidemiology. Dr. Anderson currently serves on the Board of Scientific Councilors for the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registries and the Surveillance Subcommittee of the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health Board of Scientific Councilors. His major research interests include the epidemiology of chronic disease, chronic disease surveillance systems, workers' compensation and occupational disease and injury, risk communication, and behavior modification. PETER W. AXELSON is president of Beneficial Designs, Inc., and a consultant to the rehabilitation community on all aspects of rehabilitation equipment design including testing, marketing, production and documentation of adaptive equipment for people with disabilities. He began his education at the U.S. Air Force Academy, but after a climbing accident which resulted in paralysis from the waist down, he was honorably discharged and continued his studies at Stanford University, where he earned an M.S. in mechanical engineering and design. Following graduation he worked as a rehabilitation engineer at the Palo Alto Veterans Administration's Rehabilitation Engineering Research and Development Center. Mr. Axelson has written numerous articles and is a member of the board of the Rehabilitation Engineering Society of North America (RESNA). His work in the design and development of rehabilitation equipment gained the Silver Medal of the British Royal Society of the Arts for his encouragement of arts, manufacture, and commerce in the area of special products. On behalf of the Paralyzed Veterans of America, he also participates in the development of wheelchair standards as chairperson of the American National Standards Institute/Rehabilitation Engineering Society of North America (ANSI/RESNA) Wheelchair Standards Committee, and as the U.S. delegate to the International Standards Organization (ISO). HENRY B. BETTS is currently medical director and chief executive officer of the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, and Magnuson Professor and chairman of the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Northwestern University Medical School. He received his bachelor's degree from Princeton University

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Disability in America: Toward a National Agenda for Prevention in 1950 and went on to medical studies, earning his M.D. from the University of Virginia. Following a residency at the New York University Medical Center's Institute of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, he spent two years in the U.S. Navy and two years as a teaching fellow at New York University. He then joined the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, rising to the post he holds today. Dr. Betts is a member of several professional associations, including the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine (past president), the American Medical Association, and the American Spinal Cord Injury Association. He has served on panels and committees of the National Institutes of Health and the National Academy of Sciences and has authored or co-authored more than 25 publications in the field of rehabilitation medicine. He was recently honored for 25 years of service as leader of the Rehabilitation Institute. ALLEN C. CROCKER is the director of the Developmental Evaluation Center and senior associate in medicine at the Children's Hospital in Boston. He holds a joint appointment as associate professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and associate professor of maternal and child health at Harvard School of Public Health. His research interests involve the etiology of mental retardation, systems of care for persons with developmental disabilities, and prevention. He has co-edited two books and has had substantial involvement with planning and evaluation projects for the prevention of developmental disabilities, both nationally and in the programs of various states. GERBEN DeJONG is director of research at the National Rehabilitation Hospital in Washington, D.C., and professor of the Department of Community and Family Medicine at Georgetown University's School of Medicine. Earlier, he was a senior research associate and associate professor in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston. Dr. DeJong's academic training is in economics and public policy studies. His main research interests are disability and health outcome measurement, health care utilization, disability policy, epidemiology, national health care policy, and medical ethics. He is the author of more than 100 papers on health, disability, and income policy issues but is perhaps best known for his seminal work on disability policy and the independent living movement. His works have appeared in such diverse publications as Business and Health, Scientific American, Stroke, and the Journal of Health, Politics, Policy, and Law. In 1985, he received the Licht Award for Excellence in Scientific Writing from the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. JOHN F. DITUNNO, JR., is director of the National Rehabilitation and Research Center in Spinal Cord Injury (Neural Recovery and Functional

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Disability in America: Toward a National Agenda for Prevention Enhancement) and director of the Regional Spinal Cord Injury Model System Center at Thomas Jefferson University. His major research interests are motor recovery and functional prognosis and medical complications (e.g., deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary emboli prevention, atelectasis and pneumonia) in spinal cord injury. He is past president of the Association of Academic Physiatrists and the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, and past chairman of the American Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. He is currently a member of the Advisory Committee for Injury Prevention and Control of the Centers for Disease Control and president of the American Spinal Injury Association. JOSEPH T. ENGLISH is chairman of psychiatry at St. Vincent's Hospital and Medical Center of New York and professor of psychiatry and associate dean of New York Medical College. Prior to joining St. Vincent's, Dr. English was the first president and chief executive officer of the New York Health and Hospitals Corporation. He has also served as chief psychiatrist of the Peace Corps, director of health programs for the Office of Economic Opportunity in the Executive Office of the President, and administrator of the Health and Mental Health Services Administration of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. For the past two years, Dr. English has been chairman of the Professional and Technical Advisory Committee for the Hospital and Accreditation Program of the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Care Organizations; since 1975, he has served as chairman of the Mental Health/Substance Abuse Service Committee of the Greater New York Hospital Association. He was also the first Chairman of the Council on Economics of the American Psychiatric Association and now chairs its Task Force on Prospective Payment. Dr. English is a fellow of the Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, American Psychiatric Association, American College of Psychiatrists, New York Academy of Medicine, and the American College of Mental Health Administration. A member of the board of directors of the Kennedy Child Study Center and the board of trustees of Sarah Lawrence College, he is also a Visiting Fellow of the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation. He is a member of the editorial board of the Psychiatric Times and a consultant to the editorial board of the American Psychiatric Press, and has authored more than 100 papers and articles on health-related issues. DOUGLAS A. FENDERSON is a professor in the Department of Family Practice and Community Health and the School of Public Health of the University of Minnesota, as well as director of the Computer Center and associate director for research of the Department of Family Practice and Community Health. As director of continuing medical education for the University of Minnesota School of Public Health, he helped develop a regional

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Disability in America: Toward a National Agenda for Prevention network of accredited continuing medical education sites. He has also served as chief of health services manpower, National Center for Health Services Research; director of the Office of Special Programs, Bureau of Health Professions Education; and, more recently, director of the National Institute of Handicapped Research (now the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research). MARGARET J. GIANNINI is presently deputy assistant chief medical director for rehabilitation and prosthetics for the Department of Veterans Affairs and director of the Rehabilitation Research and Development Service. In 1979, she was appointed the first director of the National Institute of Handicapped Research; she also founded and directed the Mental Retardation Institute of New York Medical College and established one of the first university-affiliated facilities at New York Medical College. Nationally, Dr. Giannini is past president of the American Association on Mental Retardation and the American Association of University Affiliated Programs. She has been actively involved as a member of the National Committee of Children with Handicaps of the American Academy of Pediatrics; she created the Prevention Committee of the American Association on Mental Retardation, and was appointed United Nations Interregional Advisor on Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities. She has also been named special consultant to the Mental Retardation Construction Unit of the National Institutes of Health, vice president for medicine of the American Association on Mental Retardation, consultant by special invitation to the President's Committee on Mental Retardation on Early Screening for Prevention, a member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Kennedy Child Study Center, and a member of the Institute of Medicine. She is a diplomate of the American Board of Pediatrics and a fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Dr. Giannini is the recipient of numerous awards for her professional and humanitarian services and achievements, including the Wyeth Medical Achievement Award, the N. Neal Pike Prize Award for Service to the Handicapped, the Isabelle and Leonard H. Goldenson Award for Technology Application to Cerebral Palsy, and the Distinguished Service Award presented by the President's Committee on Employment of the Handicapped. MITCHELL P. LaPLANTE is assistant research sociologist and director of the Disability Statistics Program at the Institute for Health and Aging, University of California, San Francisco. While a Social Science Research Council fellow, he received his Ph.D. in sociology from Stanford University and received an award from the American Sociological Association for the best dissertation in medical sociology. He has authored several papers and reports concerned with disability. His research interests include conceptual

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Disability in America: Toward a National Agenda for Prevention and definitional issues in disability, the demography and epidemiology of disability, and disability policy. G. DEAN MacEWEN is chairman and director of education in the Department of Pediatric Orthopaedics at the Children's Hospital in New Orleans. He is also professor and chief of the Section of Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, at the Louisiana State University Medical Center, also in New Orleans. Dr. MacEwen is a member of the Société Internationale de Chirurgie Orthopédique et de Traumatologie, for which he serves as first vice president of the executive board and U.S. delegate; the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons; and the American Orthopaedic Association, for which he chairs the Foreign Fellowship Committee. He also chairs the Subcommittee in Pediatric Care of the Louisiana chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics, and serves as an examiner of the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery. Dr. MacEwen is a member of the Medical Clinical Care Advisory Board of the National Neurofibromatosis Foundation, and acts as Medical Advisor for the Louisiana-Gulfcoast chapter; he also holds membership in the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society and the Scoliosis Research Society. Before he assumed his present positions, he was medical director of the Alfred I. duPont Institute and past president of the American Orthopaedic Association, the Scoliosis Research Society, and the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society. ELLEN J. MacKENZIE is assistant director of the Health Services Research and Development Center and associate professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. She also holds joint appointments in biostatistics and in emergency medicine in the School of Medicine. Her research interests include injury severity scaling and the evaluation of emergency medical and rehabilitation services for preventing death and disability associated with traumatic injury. She has authored several publications in these areas, including a recent report to Congress entitled Cost of Injury in the United States (with Dorothy P. Rice and Associates). Ongoing studies for which she is a principal investigator include (1) development and application of methods for evaluating the performance or regionalized systems of trauma care; (2) a multi-institutional, collaborative study of the long-term effects and rehabilitation needs of persons who sustain severe lower-extremity fractures; and (3) development of a functional impairment index for traumatic injuries. Dr. MacKenzie is currently a member of the board of directors of the Association of the Advancement of Automotive Medicine and past chair of the Injury Control/Emergency Health Services Special Primary Interest Group of the American Public Health Association. She also acts as an advisor to private and government agencies involved in the delivery and evaluation of rehabilitation services.

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Disability in America: Toward a National Agenda for Prevention GEORGE L. MADDOX, JR., is professor of sociology and of medical sociology (psychiatry) and chairs the University Council on Aging and Human Development at Duke University. He also directs Duke's World Health Organization/Pan American Health Organization Collaborating Research Center on Aging and the university's Long-Term Care Resources Program. Associated with gerontology and geriatrics since 1959, he served as director of the Duke Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development from 1972 to 1982. He was a founding member of the initial National Advisory Council of the National Institute on Aging, has served as president of the Gerontological Society of America, has chaired the Sociology of Aging Section of the American Sociological Association, and has served as vice president of the Southern Sociological Society. From 1985 to 1989 he served as secretary-general and vice president of the International Association of Gerontology. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Dr. Maddox has been awarded the Sandoz International Prize for Research in Aging. DAVID MECHANIC is director of the Institute for Health, Health Care Policy, and Aging Research at Rutgers University, a University Professor, and the René Dubos Professor of Behavioral Sciences. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine and serves on the National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics of the Department of Health and Human Services and the Health Advisory Board of the General Accounting Office. He chairs the National Institute of Mental Health's Advisory Group on Research Resources in Mental Health Services Research and recently served as vice chair of the Institute of Medicine's Committee for Pain, Disability, and Chronic Illness Behavior. Dr. Mechanic is a member of the National Institutes of Health's National Advisory Council on Aging, chair of the council's Program Committee, and chair of the Section on Social, Economic and Political Sciences of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is also the author of numerous books and other publications on health policy and health services research. JOHN L. MELVIN is professor and chairman of the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the Medical College of Wisconsin and medical director of the Curative Rehabilitation Center of Milwaukee. He is president-elect of the Council of Medical Specialty Societies and past president of the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine, the American Association of Electromyography and Electrodiagnosis, the National Association of Rehabilitation Facilities, and the Association of Academic Physiatrists. He is a founding member of the American Board of Electrodiagnostic Medicine and chairman of the American Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. He has lectured and consulted extensively within the United States

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Disability in America: Toward a National Agenda for Prevention and internationally. In addition, he has published regularly on subjects related to physical medicine and rehabilitation. ARTHUR T. MEYERSON is professor of psychiatry and chairman of the Department of Mental Health Sciences at the Hahnemann University School of Medicine in Philadelphia. Formerly vice chairman and clinical director of the Department of Psychiatry at Mt. Sinai School of Medicine in New York City, he has written extensively in the area of psychiatric disability and chairs the National American Psychiatric Association Committee on Psychiatric Rehabilitation as well as the Task Force on Social Security Income/Social Security Disability Insurance. He has served as chairman of the Mental Health Standing Committee of the President's Committee on Employment of the Handicapped and as an advisor to the last four commissioners of the Rehabilitation Services Administration. Currently, he is conducting studies supported by the National Institute of Mental Health in the prevention of deterioration in a population of severely mentally ill and disabled persons. DOROTHY P. RICE is professor-in-residence in the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, School of Nursing, University of California, San Francisco, with joint appointments in the university's Institute for Health and Aging and Institute for Health Policy Studies. From 1977 to 1982 she served as director of the National Center for Health Statistics. Previously she was deputy assistant commissioner for research and statistics of the Social Security Administration. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine and the Committee on National Statistics, a fellow of the American Statistical Association and the American Public Health Association, and a member of the American Economic Association, the Population Association of America, and the Gerontological Society of America. She holds a bachelor's degree in economics from the University of Wisconsin and was awarded an honorary doctorate by the College of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. Her major interests include health statistics, disability, chronic illness, aging, cost of illness studies, and the economics of medical care. JULIUS B. RICHMOND is John D. MacArthur Professor of Health Policy (Emeritus) at the Division for Health Policy Research and Education at Harvard University. He received his M.D. and M.S. degrees from the University of Illinois at Chicago. At the State University of New York at Syracuse, he chaired the Pediatrics Department and was dean of the Medical School. In 1965 he was called to Washington to direct the Head Start Program and later served as director for health affairs, initiating the Neighborhood Health Centers Program for the Office of Economic Opportunity. In 1971 he was appointed professor of child psychiatry and human development at Harvard Medical School and became director of the Judge Baker Guidance

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Disability in America: Toward a National Agenda for Prevention Center and chief of psychiatry at the Children's Hospital in Boston. From 1977 to 1981 he served as assistant secretary for health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and surgeon general of the U.S. Public Health Service. Under his leadership, the Public Health Service published Healthy People: The Surgeon General's Report on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention. Dr. Richmond has received the Martha May Eliot Award of the American Public Health Association, the Ronald McDonald Children's Charities prize, and the Gustav Lienhard Award of the Institute of Medicine, among others. MAX J. STARKLOFF is the founder and president of Paraquad as well as co-founder and elected president (in 1983, 1984, and 1985) of the National Council of Independent Living. In the past he chaired the Peer Review Panel for the Title VII Independent Living Grant and Independent Living Program applications and served as an advisor to the National Council on the Handicapped. In August 1985 Mr. Starkloff was one of fifteen delegates to the First Annual Japan-USA Conference of Persons with Disabilities held in Tokyo and Osaka, Japan. Currently, he serves as a member of the advisory committee to the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center in the Prevention and Treatment of Secondary Complications in Spinal Cord Injury at Northwestern University's Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago. Mr. Starkloff has received numerous awards in recognition of his work, including the Commissioner's Distinguished Service Award, from the Commissioner of the Rehabilitation Services Administration, a commendation from the National Council on the Handicapped, and an honorary doctorate of humane letters from the University of Missouri-St. Louis. DEBORAH A. STONE holds the David Pokross Chair in Law and Social Policy at the Heller Graduate School of Brandeis University. She received a Ph.D. in political science from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and has held faculty appointments in political science and public policy at Duke University, MIT, and Brandeis University. She has been a Guggenheim Fellow and a Fellow in Liberal Arts at Harvard Law School. Her research interests include health insurance in the United States and Europe, disability policy, and preventive medicine. She is the author of numerous articles as well as three books: The Limits of Professional Power: National Health Care in the Federal Republic of Germany; The Disabled State; and Policy Paradox and Political Reason. S. LEONARD SYME is professor of epidemiology at the School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley. He received his Ph.D. in medical sociology from Yale University in 1957. His research has focused on the social, psychological, and cultural factors that increase the risk of such diseases as coronary heart disease, stroke, and cancer among particular population

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Disability in America: Toward a National Agenda for Prevention groups (his studies have included Japanese immigrants to the United States, bus drivers in San Francisco, and civil servants in London). He has also been involved in the design and conduct of community projects to prevent these diseases as well as community studies of smoking cessation, early detection for cancer, and programs to help people reduce disease risk factors. His current research interest is the importance of the early years of life to the development and prevention of disease risk. Dr. Syme's recent publications have dealt with the topics of social support, socioeconomic status, and control of destiny. JOHN E. WARE, JR., is senior scientist at the Institute for the Improvement of Medical Care and Health at the New England Medical Center Hospitals. He is also principal investigator for the Medical Outcomes Study, which assesses variations in physician practice style and outcomes for patients with chronic conditions treated in different systems of care. Formerly senior research psychologist at the RAND Corporation, he was the principal architect of the surveys of health outcomes and patient satisfaction used in RAND's Health Insurance Experiment. Dr. Ware's current research and consulting activities focus on the development and validation of more practical measures of functional status, well-being measures of process and outcomes in health policy evaluation, health care management, clinical research, and medical practice.

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