Authors

ROBERT W. ALLARD (Subcommittee Chairman) Allard is emeritus professor of genetics at the University of California, Davis. He has a Ph.D. degree in genetics from the University of Wisconsin. His areas of research include plant population genetics, gene resource conservation, and plant breeding. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

PAULO DE T. ALVIM Since 1963, Alvim has been the scientific director for the Comiss ão Executiva do Plano da Lavoura Cacaueira, Brasil. He earned a Ph.D. degree from Cornell University with specialization in plant physiology, tropical agriculture, and ecology.

AMRAM ASHRI Since 1971 he has been professor of genetics and breeding at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel. He has a Ph.D. degree in genetics from the University of California, Davis. His areas of research include plant breeding and the evaluation and utilization of germplasm resources.

JOHN H. BARTON Since 1975 Barton has been a professor of law and director of the International Center on Law and Technology at Stanford University, where he earned his law degree. He is also cofounder of International Technology Management, a consulting firm specializing in international technology, trade, regulation, and transfer. He is a recognized expert on property rights as they relate to genetic resources.



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MANAGING GLOBAL GENETIC RESOURCES: The U.S. National Plant Germplasm System Authors ROBERT W. ALLARD (Subcommittee Chairman) Allard is emeritus professor of genetics at the University of California, Davis. He has a Ph.D. degree in genetics from the University of Wisconsin. His areas of research include plant population genetics, gene resource conservation, and plant breeding. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. PAULO DE T. ALVIM Since 1963, Alvim has been the scientific director for the Comiss ão Executiva do Plano da Lavoura Cacaueira, Brasil. He earned a Ph.D. degree from Cornell University with specialization in plant physiology, tropical agriculture, and ecology. AMRAM ASHRI Since 1971 he has been professor of genetics and breeding at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel. He has a Ph.D. degree in genetics from the University of California, Davis. His areas of research include plant breeding and the evaluation and utilization of germplasm resources. JOHN H. BARTON Since 1975 Barton has been a professor of law and director of the International Center on Law and Technology at Stanford University, where he earned his law degree. He is also cofounder of International Technology Management, a consulting firm specializing in international technology, trade, regulation, and transfer. He is a recognized expert on property rights as they relate to genetic resources.

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MANAGING GLOBAL GENETIC RESOURCES: The U.S. National Plant Germplasm System FREDERICK H. BUTTEL Buttel is a professor in the Department of Rural Sociology and a faculty associate in the Program on Science, Technology, and Society at Cornell University. He earned a Ph.D. degree in sociology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His areas of interest are in technology and social change, particularly in relation to agricultural research and biotechnology. TE-TZU CHANG Chang has been head of the International Rice Germplasm Center at the International Rice Research Institute since 1983 and principal scientist since 1985. He has also been a visiting professor at the University of the Philippines, Los Baños, since 1962. He earned a Ph.D. degree in plant genetics and breeding from the University of Minnesota. He had a vital role in the Green Revolution in rice. Chang has broad experience in managing and designing plant genebanks. JOHN L. CREECH Creech retired from the U.S. Department of Agriculture in 1980. He is presently a senior adviser to the International Board for Plant Genetics Resources in developing genetic resources management systems. His Ph.D. degree from the University of Maryland is in botany. His particular areas of expertise is in plant exploration in the Far East and the Soviet Union. PETER R. DAY (Committee Chairman) Before joining Rutgers University as director of the Center for Agricultural Molecular Biology in 1987, Day was the director of the Plant Breeding Institute, Cambridge, United Kingdom. He has a Ph.D. degree from the University of London, and is a leader in the field of biotechnology and its application to agriculture. S. M. (SAM) DIETZ From 1966 until his retirement in July 1990, Dietz was coordinator and research leader for the Western Regional Plant Introduction Station, Pullman, Washington. He earned his Ph.D. degree in plant pathology from Washington State University. He has been involved in long-term planning for the National Plant Germplasm System (NPGS), as well as other government studies of the system, and has served as a consultant to overseas agencies. ROBERT E. EVENSON Since 1977 Evenson has been a professor of economics at Yale University. He has a Ph.D. degree in economics from the University of Chicago. His research interests include agricultural

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MANAGING GLOBAL GENETIC RESOURCES: The U.S. National Plant Germplasm System development policy with a special interest in the economics of agricultural research. HENRY A. FITZHUGH Fitzhugh is deputy director general for research at the International Livestock Center for Africa, Ethiopia. He received a Ph.D. degree in animal breeding from Texas A&M University. His field of research is the development and testing of biological and socioeconomic interventions to improve the productivity of livestock in agricultural production systems. MAJOR M. GOODMAN Goodman is professor of crop science, statistics, genetics, and botany at North Carolina State University (NCSU) where he has been employed since 1967. He has a Ph.D. degree in genetics from NCSU, and his areas of research are plant breeding, germplasm conservation and utilization, numerical taxonomy, history and evolution of maize, and applied multivariate statistics. Goodman is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. JAAP J. HARDON In 1985, Hardon became the director of the Center for Genetics Resources, The Netherlands. He has a Ph.D. degree in plant genetics from the University of California. His specialty is plant breeding and genetics. VIRGIL A. JOHNSON Before his retirement in 1986 Johnson was a research agronomist for the North-Central Region of the Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and is professor emeritus of agronomy at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln. He earned his Ph.D. degree in agronomy from the University of Nebraska. His areas of interest are wheat breeding and genetics, genetics and physiology of wheat, and protein quantity and nutritional quality. DONALD R. MARSHALL Since 1987 Marshall has been professor of agronomy at the Waite Agricultural Research Institute, University of Adelaide, Australia. He has a Ph.D. degree in genetics from the University of California, Davis. His professional interests are population genetics, plant breeding, host-parasite interactions, and genetic resources conservation. A. BRUCE MAUNDER Maunder is vice-president of agronomic research at DEKALB Plant Genetics. He has a Ph.D. degree from Purdue University in plant breeding and genetics, and is a well-known sorghum breeder with considerable experience in the use of exotic germplasm.

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MANAGING GLOBAL GENETIC RESOURCES: The U.S. National Plant Germplasm System CALVIN O. QUALSET (Work Group Chairman) Qualset is the director of the Genetic Resources Conservation Program (since 1985) and professor of agronomy (since 1967) at the University of California, Davis, where he also earned a Ph.D. degree in genetics. He is active in administration of genetics resources conservation and has special interests in host-plant resistance, quantitative genetics and breeding crops, especially cereals, for agronomic and quality characteristics. RAJENDRA S. PARODA Paroda is the deputy director general for crop sciences at the Indian Council of Agricultural Research, New Delhi. He has a Ph.D. degree in genetics from the Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi. He is well known for his contributions as a forage breeder and for his leadership in the field of plant genetic resources in India. SETIJATI SASTRAPRADJA Sastrapradja is affiliated with the National Center for Research in Biotechnology at the Indonesian Institute of Science. She has a Ph.D. degree in botany from the University of Hawaii. CHARLES SMITH Smith is a professor of animal breeding strategies at the University of Guelph, Canada. He has a Ph.D. degree in animal breeding from Iowa State University. His research area is in animal breeding strategies, including genetic conservation, and he has been involved in international efforts to conserve domestic animal germplasm. JOHN A. SPENCE In 1989, Spence was appointed head of the Cocoa Research Unit at the University of the West Indies, Trinidad and Tobago. He has a Ph.D. degree from the University of Bristol, United Kingdom. His research interests are cocoa tissue culture and cryopreservation as alternatives to holding field germplasm collections. DAVID H. TIMOTHY Timothy has been professor of crop science, botany, and genetics at North Carolina State University since 1966. He has a Ph.D. degree in plant genetics from the University of Minnesota, and has extensive experience in collection, maintenance, characterization, and utilization of germplasm resources of maize and its relatives. His forage breeding research is with subtropical grasses to develop temperate perennial cultivars of superior nutritional quality, yield, and animal performance. H. GARRISON WILKES Since 1983, Wilkes has been professor of

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MANAGING GLOBAL GENETIC RESOURCES: The U.S. National Plant Germplasm System biology at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. He has a Ph.D degree in biology from Harvard University. His field of research is evolution under domestication in cultivated plants, especially maize and its wild relatives, teosinte, and the genus Tripsacum. LYNDSEY A. WITHERS Since 1988, Withers has been the in vitro conservation officer in the research program of the International Board for Plant Genetic Resources, Rome, Italy. She has a Ph.D. degree in botany from the University of Nottingham, United Kingdom, and has extensive knowledge of the application of tissue culture, cryopreservation, and plant biotechnology to the conservation of plant genetic resources.