effects. However, the effects are not disabling and are transient and reversible upon cessation of exposure.

AEGL-2 is the airborne concentration (expressed as ppm or mg/m3) of a substance above which it is predicted that the general population, including susceptible individuals, could experience irreversible or other serious, long-lasting adverse health effects or an impaired ability to escape.

AEGL-3 is the airborne concentration (expressed as ppm or mg/m3) of a substance above which it is predicted that the general population, including susceptible individuals, could experience life-threatening health effects or death.

Airborne concentrations below the AEGL-1 represent exposure concentrations that could produce mild and progressively increasing but transient and nondisabling odor, taste, and sensory irritation or certain asymptomatic, nonsensory effects. With increasing airborne concentrations above each AEGL, there is a progressive increase in the likelihood of occurrence and the severity of effects described for each corresponding AEGL. Although the AEGL values represent threshold concentrations for the general public, including susceptible subpopulations, such as infants, children, the elderly, persons with asthma, and those with other illnesses, it is recognized that individuals, subject to idiosyncratic responses, could experience the effects described at concentrations below the corresponding AEGL.

SUMMARY

Chloroacetone is produced by the direct chlorination of acetone. It also has been manufactured by reacting chlorine with diketene followed by boiling with water. It is used in the manufacture of couplers for color photography, as a photosensitizer for polyester-vinyl polymerization, as a fungicide and bactericide, and as an intermediate in the production of perfumes, antioxidants, and pharmaceuticals (Sargent et al. 1986). Chloroacetone has a pungent, suffocating odor similar to hydrogen chloride. It is toxic by inhalation, ingestion, and dermal contact, and causes immediate lacrimation at low concentrations. Other effects from exposure to chloroacetone include contact burns of the skin and eyes, nausea, bronchospasm, delayed pulmonary edema, and death.

Data were insufficient for deriving AEGL-1 and AEGL-2 values for chloroacetone. The available data on acute toxicity suggest that chloroacetone has a steep dose-response relationship. Therefore, the AEGL-2 values were calculated by taking a three-fold reduction in the corresponding AEGL-3 values; those values are considered estimates of a threshold for irreversible effects.

A 1-h BMCL05 (benchmark concentration, 95% lower confidence limit with 5% response) of 131 ppm in the male rat was used as the basis of the AEGL-3 values (Arts and Zwart 1987). Interspecies and intraspecies uncertainty factors of 3 each were applied, because the preponderance of the data suggests that the effects of inhaled chloroacetone are likely caused by a direct chemical



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