BIOGRAPHIES

DAVID WILSON TALMAGE is chairman of the Subcommittee on Immunotoxicology and a distinguished professor at the University of Colorado. He was formerly dean of the Medical School and then director of the Webb Waring Lung Institute. Dr. Talmage received his M.D. degree from Washington University and has honorary degrees from Buena Vista College and Colorado State University. He was a Markle scholar of medical science, a consultant for the Veterans Administration Hospital, and an editor of the Journal of Allergy. His memberships include the National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, the American Society for Clinical Investigation, the American Association of Immunologists, for which he served as president for 1 year, and the American Academy of Allergy, for which he also served as president for 1 year. His research concerns the effect of oxygen during culture on survival of mouse thyroid allografts and immunologic tolerance in animals bearing cultured allografts.

DAVID E. BICE is a senior scientist at the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute in Albuquerque, New Mexico. He is the education coordinator at the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute and holds joint appointments in the Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology at the University of New Mexico and the Department of Pathology at Colorado State University. His primary research interests are to determine the mechanisms responsible for the induction of pulmonary immunity and how abnormal immune responses cause pulmonary hypersensitivity. He also studies pulmonary defenses to pathogens and how immune responses in the lung may be altered by inhalation of pollutants. Dr. Bice has served on numerous committees including those of the National Research Council and the National Institutes of Health.

JOHN C. BLOOM holds a B.S. degree in biology from the University of Pittsburgh and doctorates in veterinary medicine and comparative hematology from the University of Pennsylvania. He completed his postdoctoral training at Lankenau Hospital (Jefferson Medical College) in hematology/oncology and served on the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine for 5 years before joining Smith Kline and French Laboratories



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Biologic Markers in Immunotoxicology BIOGRAPHIES DAVID WILSON TALMAGE is chairman of the Subcommittee on Immunotoxicology and a distinguished professor at the University of Colorado. He was formerly dean of the Medical School and then director of the Webb Waring Lung Institute. Dr. Talmage received his M.D. degree from Washington University and has honorary degrees from Buena Vista College and Colorado State University. He was a Markle scholar of medical science, a consultant for the Veterans Administration Hospital, and an editor of the Journal of Allergy. His memberships include the National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, the American Society for Clinical Investigation, the American Association of Immunologists, for which he served as president for 1 year, and the American Academy of Allergy, for which he also served as president for 1 year. His research concerns the effect of oxygen during culture on survival of mouse thyroid allografts and immunologic tolerance in animals bearing cultured allografts. DAVID E. BICE is a senior scientist at the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute in Albuquerque, New Mexico. He is the education coordinator at the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute and holds joint appointments in the Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology at the University of New Mexico and the Department of Pathology at Colorado State University. His primary research interests are to determine the mechanisms responsible for the induction of pulmonary immunity and how abnormal immune responses cause pulmonary hypersensitivity. He also studies pulmonary defenses to pathogens and how immune responses in the lung may be altered by inhalation of pollutants. Dr. Bice has served on numerous committees including those of the National Research Council and the National Institutes of Health. JOHN C. BLOOM holds a B.S. degree in biology from the University of Pittsburgh and doctorates in veterinary medicine and comparative hematology from the University of Pennsylvania. He completed his postdoctoral training at Lankenau Hospital (Jefferson Medical College) in hematology/oncology and served on the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine for 5 years before joining Smith Kline and French Laboratories

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Biologic Markers in Immunotoxicology as associate director of pathology, where he worked for 8 years. He currently heads clinical pathology at Lilly Research Laboratories and holds faculty appointments at the University of Pennsylvania and Purdue University. LOREN D. KOLLER, D.V.M., Ph.D., has been the dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine at Oregon State University since July of 1985. Prior to this appointment as dean, he served as associate dean of veterinary medicine at the University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho, from 1978 to 1985. Previous appointments were at the U.S. Army Medical Unit at Fort Detrick, Maryland, at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, and at the School of Veterinary Medicine at Oregon State University. Dr. Koller received his D.V.M. degree from Washington State University in 1965, and a Ph.D. in pathology from the University of Wisconsin in 1971. Dr. Koller has been actively engaged as a pathologist and researcher in the areas of pathology, toxicology, immunology, carcinogenesis, and nutrition. He has pioneered the area of immunotoxicology since the early 1970's. He is a member of several scientific and professional organizations, and has served as president of the Immunotoxicology Specialty Section of the Society of Toxicology. Dr. Koller has published extensively in numerous refereed journals, served on editorial boards and grant review panels, and has served as a consultant on numerous occasions. He is currently chairman of the Animals in Research Committee for the Society of Toxicology. MICHAEL EMANUEL LAMM is a professor and chairman of pathology at Case Western Reserve University. He received his M.D. from the University of Rochester, his M.S. from Western University and has earned a diploma from the American Board of Pathology. He advanced from an intern to resident pathologist at University Hospital in Cleveland and from assistant professor to professor of pathology at the School of Medicine for New York University. He also was a research associate in chemistry for the National Institute of Health. Dr. Lamm's memberships include New York Academy of Sciences, the American Society of Biological Chemists, the Society of Experimental Biology and Medicine, the American Association of Immunology, and the American Association of Pathologists. Dr. Lamm's research is focused on mucosal immunity and immunopathology. MICHAEL I. LUSTER is head of the Immunotoxicology Group at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences and adjunct professor in toxicology at Duke University Medical Center. His research interest, as reflected in his numerous publications, include immunology and toxicology. He has served on committees for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Food and Drug Administration, Centers for Disease Control, and the AIDS Executive Committee for the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Luster also serves on the editorial board of Environmental Health Perspectives, and International Journal of Immunopharmacology. WILLIAM J. MEGGS is an assistant professor with the Department of Medicine, East Carolina University School of Medicine. He earned his B.S. from Clemson University, his Ph.D. from Syracuse University, and his M.D. from University of Miami. The fellowships and awards Dr. Meggs has received include the Woodrow Wilson Honorary Fellowship, the Clemson University Faculty Medal, and The National Science Foundation Post-Doctoral Fellowship. Dr. Meggs has

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Biologic Markers in Immunotoxicology been a research physicist at the University of Rochester, visiting scientist with the European Organization for Nuclear Research in Geneva, research physicist at McGill University, professor at Vanier College in Montreal, resident at Rochester General Hospital, medical staff fellow with the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease, National Institutes of Health, and assistant director of the Emergency Department at Washington Hospital Center. Dr. Meggs has several membership affiliations including the American Academy of Allergy and Immunology, the American Association of Immunologists, the American Physical Society, the American Medical Association, and the North Carolina Thoracic Society. Dr. Meggs is board certified in internal medicine, emergency medicine, and allergy and clinical immunology. In addition to his clinical practice in allergy and clinical immunology, Dr. Meggs is involved in research in the role of peripheral blood stem cells in asthma and other inflammatory conditions and has research interest in chemical sensitivity syndromes and the relationship between psychiatric syndromes and airway dysfunction. He has recently proposed a theory concerning the role of internal electric fields in determining the spatial organization of microtubular structures in cells. ALBERT E. MUNSON is with the Medical College of Virginia. Previously he was associated with the Memorial Institute as a cancer research scientist. Dr. Muson's memberships are extensive and include the American Association for Cancer Research, the American Association for Microbiology, the American Association of Immunologists, the American Cancer Society, the American College of Toxicology, the American Society of Pharmaceutical and Experimental Therapeutics, the Archives of Toxicology, the International Society of Immunopharmaceuticals, the National Capital Area Chapter of the Society of Toxicology, the Reticuloendothelial Society, Sigma Xi, and the Society of Risk Assessment. KATHLEEN E. RODGERS is a faculty member in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine at the University of Southern California. Her research interests include the assessment of the immunotoxicologic potential of organophosphate pesticides, the immunopharmacology of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, peritoneal wound healing, and development of immunoassays for ovarian proteins. Dr. Rodgers received a B.A. degree in biology for the University of California, Irvine, and Ph.D. degree from the University of California, Riverside. She is a member of the Society of Toxicology (national and Southern California chapters) and the American Association of Immunotoxicologists. She is currently secretary-treasurer for the Immunotoxicology Specialty Section for the Society of Toxicology. NOEL R. ROSE is professor and chairman of the Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases at The Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. He holds joint appointments in the Departments of Medicine and of Environmental Health Sciences. He also directs the World Health Organization collaborating laboratory for immunologic disorders. His major research interests relate to questions of immunologic self-non-self discrimination and the problem of autoimmune disease. He and his colleagues have published extensively on the genetic basis of autoimmunity and on the actions of environmental and infectious agents in promoting autoimmune diseases in susceptible humans and in experimental animals. He is currently editor-in-chief of Clinical Immunology and Immunopathology, secretary-treasurer of the Clinical Immunology Society, steering committee member of the Immunotoxicology

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Biologic Markers in Immunotoxicology Discussion Group, and member of the Board of Governors of the American Academy of Microbiology. PAUL A. SCHULTE is chief of the Screening and Notification Section of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, and adjunct faculty of the Department of Environmental Health at the University of Cincinnati. Dr. Schulte received a B.A. in zoology and geography from the University of Toronto, a M.S. in health planning from the University of Cincinnati, and a Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of Cincinnati. He served on advisory panels of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Agency for Toxic Exposure and Disease Registry, Pennsylvania Occupational Disease Study, the Council on Environmental Quality, and the National Research Council. He has served as a consultant to the World Health Organization teaching occupational epidemiology in Beijing. He has served as guest editor for the Journal of Occupational Medicine. CURTIS C. TRAVIS, Ph.D., is director of the Office of Risk Analysis in the Health and Safety Research Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tenn. Dr. Travis obtained his training at the University of California, Davis, receiving his Ph.D. in applied mathematics in 1971. He served as research engineer at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory of the California Institute of Technology 1966-68, and taught engineering and applied mathematics at Vanderbilt University, 1971-74, and the University of Tennessee, 1974-76. He has been at ORNL since 1976. Dr. Travis is chairman of the Office of Science and Technology Policy Task Force on Risk Analysis in Federal Agencies, a member of the Science Advisory Board for the National Center for Toxicological Research (NCTR), and a member of the Scientific Advisory Panel on the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. He collaborated with the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry in production of their Guidance Document for Health Assessments at Superfund Sites. Dr. Travis is also president-elect of the National Society for Risk Analysis (1990), and is editor-in-chief of Risk Analysis: An International Journal. ERNEST S. TUCKER III, M.D., is chairman of pathology at California Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco. He was formerly director of the Immunology Reference Laboratory at Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation in La Jolla, Calif. His medical training and pathology residency were at the University of Alabama in Birmingham, and later he held a research fellowship in immunopathology at Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation. He has served in the military at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology as a specialist in pulmonary pathology. He has held faculty positions at the University of Alabama, University of Wisconsin, University of California, San Diego and currently at the University of California, San Francisco. In 1977, he was instrumental in developing the Immunology Reference Laboratory at Scripps Clinic to transfer diagnostic medical technology from research studies at Scripps Clinic. During his tenure at Scripps Clinic he directed the assessment of immunologic parameters in the health status evaluations of subjects in the U.S. Air Force RANCH HAND study of the long-term effects of exposure to Agent Orange (dioxin). He has published extensively in the areas of immunology and immunopathology with special emphasis on the role of biochemical and cellular factors in immunologic diseases. He is past commissioner of continuing education and vice president of the American Society of Clinical Pathologists and is currently president-elect of that organization.

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Biologic Markers in Immunotoxicology ROBERT F. VOGT is a research chemist in the Immunotoxicology Section of the Centers for Disease Control. He earned his B.A. from The John Hopkins University, and his Ph.D. from the School of Hygiene and Public Health. Dr. Vogt's memberships include Delta Omega Honorary Public Health Society, The Johns Hopkins University Immunology Council, where he served as a lecturer in undergraduate and graduate courses, the New York Academy of Sciences, the Society of Analytical Cytology, and the Southeastern Regional Flow Cytometry Group. THOMAS A. WALDMANN is chief of the Metabolism Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health. His research interests as reflected in his over 500 scientific publications have focused on the regulation of the human immune response and the disorders of this regulation in immunodeficiency diseases and malignancy. He is a consultant to the World Health Organization Committee on Immunodeficiency Diseases and is on the editorial or advisory board of 10 journals including the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA. He has served as president of the Clinical Immunology Society. Dr. Waldmann's scientific contributions have been recognized by a number of honors including invitations to present over 50 named honorary lectures, the Stratton Metal, the Lila Gruber Prize for Cancer Research, the Simon Shubitz Prize for Cancer Research, the CIBA-GEIGY DREW Award in Biomedical Research, the Milken Family Medical Foundation Distinguished Basic Scientist Award, election to the National Academy of Sciences in 1985 and to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1989. GARY R. BURLESON is in the Pulmonary Toxicology Branch, Environmental Toxicology Division, Health Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, N.C., where he is involved in the development of methods to assess pulmonary immunocompetence following inhalation of air pollutants. Dr. Burleson serves on the advisory board of Modern Methods in Toxicology, the Steering Committee of the Immunotoxicology Discussion Group, and on various committees of the immunotoxicology specialty section of the Society of Toxicology. He holds adjunct faculty positions at North Carolina State University, North Carolina Central University, and New York University Medical Center. His laboratory has developed models for the study of pulmonary immunology, pulmonary viral disease, asthma, inflammation, and pulmonary oncology.

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