• There is a general feeling in Germany that the People's Republic of China is being treated more favorably than Eastern Europe.

  • Increased amounts of CoCom-controlled equipment from non-CoCom countries are showing up throughout Eastern Europe.

  • East European economic problems will continue to slow the potential for trade. In fact, a number of U.S. firms are doing business on a deferred-payment basis.

MEETINGS IN BELGIUM

During its stay in Brussels, the delegation held meetings with representatives of the Belgian government, the Commission of the European Community, the European Parliament, and the U.S. Mission to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). It also met with two Dutch academic experts on strategic technology trade who traveled to Brussels specifically to meet with the delegation.

Government Officials

The Belgian approach to export controls can be explained by the following points:

  • 60 percent of the Belgian economy depends on exports, but less than 1 percent of those goods are CoCom controlled.

  • Twice this century the United States has come to the rescue of Belgium. This has left a favorable view of the United States, NATO, and a united Europe.

  • The Soviet threat is seen in Belgium as diminishing.

Belgian officials stated that the government viewed the new U.S. proposals for CoCom with great interest. In particular, they noted that Belgium had called for greater streamlining of the control lists at an earlier meeting of CoCom. The government believes that CoCom has been a positive force over the past four decades, but that it can only remain effective if it has the support of the international business community. That is why streamlining the control lists is so important. The Belgians noted that the country has export controls of many types, which are carried out by Royal Decree and under the authority of the Export Act of 1964. The regulations control both tangible products and written materials, but a Belgian citizen can transfer technical data verbally without violating the law.

The government representatives noted that Belgium was a signatory to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and that it would soon join the Missile Technology Control Regime. Moreover, due to its geographic location, Belgium is very sensitive to the need to control chemical and biological weapons



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