APPENDIX

A

Selected Employment Data



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THE COMPETITIVE EDGE: Research Priorities for U.S. Manufacturing APPENDIX A Selected Employment Data

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THE COMPETITIVE EDGE: Research Priorities for U.S. Manufacturing TABLE A-1 Civilian Employment in Occupations with 25,000 Workers or More, Actual 1988 and Projected to 2000, Under Low, Medium, and High Scenarios for Economic Growth (Numbers in Thousands)   Total employment 1988–2000 employment change Occupation 1988 2000 Number Percent     Low Moderate High Low Moderate High Low Moderate High Total, all occupations 118,104 127,118 136,211 144,146 9,015 18,107 26,043 8 15 22 Professional specialty occupations 14,628 17,083 18,137 19,072 2,455 3,509 4,444 17 24 30 Engineers 1,411 1,625 1,762 1,933 214 351 522 15 25 37 Aeronautical and astronautical engineers 78 80 88 101 3 10 23 3 13 29 Chemical engineers 49 52 57 62 3 8 13 7 16 27 Civil engineers, including traffic engineers 186 206 219 236 20 32 49 10 17 26 Electrical and electronics engineers 439 565 615 676 126 176 237 29 40 54 Industrial engineers, except safety engineers 132 142 155 171 10 24 40 8 18 30 Mechanical engineers 225 247 269 294 23 44 69 10 20 31 Architects and surveyors 205 227 244 265 22 39 60 11 19 29 Architects, except landscape and marine 86 99 107 117 14 21 31 16 25 36 Surveyors 100 105 112 121 5 12 22 5 12 22 Teachers, librarians, and counselors 5,379 5,937 6,228 6,499 558 849 1,121 10 16 21 Teachers, special education 275 304 317 332 29 43 57 11 16 21 Teachers, preschool 238 290 309 316 53 72 79 22 30 33 Teachers, kindergarten and elementary school 1,359 1,499 1,567 1,638 140 208 279 10 15 21 Teachers, secondary school 1,164 1,328 1,388 1,451 164 224 287 14 19 25 College and university faculty 846 831 869 908 −14 23 63 −2 3 7 Other teachers and instructors 490 514 545 571 24 55 81 5 11 17 Adult and vocational education teachers 467 493 523 548 27 56 81 6 12 17 Instructors, adult (nonvocational) education 227 250 268 282 22 41 54 10 18 24 Teachers and instructors, vocational education and training 239 243 255 266 4 16 27 2 7 11 Librarians, archivists, curators, and related workers 159 168 176 184 9 17 25 6 11 16 Librarians, professional 143 150 157 165 7 14 22 5 10 15 Counselors 124 150 157 164 26 33 41 21 27 33

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THE COMPETITIVE EDGE: Research Priorities for U.S. Manufacturing Engineering and science technicians and technologists 1,273 1,446 1,559 1,690 173 286 417 14 22 33 Engineering technicians 722 858 926 1,007 136 204 285 19 28 39 Electrical and electronic engineering technicians and technologists 341 434 471 515 93 130 174 27 38 51 Drafters 319 331 358 389 12 39 71 4 12 22 Science and mathematics technicians 232 257 275 294 25 43 62 11 19 27 Precision production, craft, and repair oocupations 14,159 14,444 15,563 16,683 285 1,404 2,525 2 10 18 Blue-collar worker supervisors 1,797 1,788 1,930 2,074 −9 133 277 −1 7 15 Machinery and related mechanics, installers, and repairers 1,620 1,777 1,910 2,038 157 290 418 10 18 26 Industrial machinery mechanics 463 496 538 580 33 75 117 7 16 25 Maintenance repairers, general utility 1,080 1,199 1,282 1,359 119 202 279 11 19 26 Millwrights 77 83 90 99 6 13 22 8 17 28 Vehicle and mobile equipment mechanics and repairers 1,598 1,738 1,868 1,984 140 270 386 9 17 24 Production occupations, precision 3,190 2,941 3,208 3,453 −249 18 263 −8 1 8 Assemblers, precision 354 236 263 291 −118 −91 −63 −33 −26 −18 Aircraft assemblers, precision 31 28 31 36 −3 −1 5 −11 −2 16 Electrical and electronic equipment assemblers, precision 161 81 91 99 −80 −71 −62 −50 −44 −39 Electromechanical equipment assemblers, precision 59 47 53 58 −11 −6 0 −19 −10 0 Machine builders and other precision machine assemblers 55 42 47 51 −13 −8 −4, −23 −15 −6 Operators, fabricators, and laborers 16,983 15,888 17,198 18,417 −1,095 215 1,434 −6 1 8 Machine setters, set-up operators, operators, and tenders 4,949 4,373 4,779 5,136 −575 −170 187 −12 −3 4 Numerical control machine tool operators and tenders, metal and plastic 64 63 70 77 −1 6 13 −1 9 21 Combination machine tool setters, set-up operators, operators, and tenders 89 88 97 105 −1 8 17 −1 9 19 Machine tool cut and form setters, operators, and tenders, metal and plastic 791 678 747 814 −114 −45 23 −14 −6 3 Drilling and boring machine tool setters and set-up operators, metal and plastic 56 49 54 59 −7 −2 3 −12, −3 6

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THE COMPETITIVE EDGE: Research Priorities for U.S. Manufacturing Grinding machine setters and set-up operators, metal and plastic 72 64 70 77 −8 „1 5 −11 −2 7 Lathe and turning machine tool setters and set-up operators, metal and plastic 89 78 86 94 −11 −3 5 −12 −3 6 Machine forming oparators and tenders, metal and plastic 184 151 166 180 −33 −18 −5 −18 −10 −2 Machine tool cutting operators and tenders, metal and plastic 148 121 133 146 −27 −15 −2 −18 −10 −1 Punching machine setters and set-up operators, metal and plastic 51 45 50 54 −6 −1 3 −11 −2 6 Metal fabricating machine setters, operators, and related workers 149 122 134 145 −27 −15 −4 −18 −10 −3 Metal fabricators, structural metal products 40 36 39 42 −4 −1 2 −10 −2 5 Welding machine setters, operators, and tenders 99 78 86 93 −21 −14 −6 −21 −14 −6 Metal and plastic processing machine setters, operators, and related workers 392 363 401 437 −29 9 45 −7 2 11 Electrolytic plating machine operators and tenders, setters and set-up operators, metal and plastic 44 37 41 44 −8 −4 0 −17 −8 0 Metal molding machine operators and tenders, setters and set-up operators 35 31 35 38 −4 −1 2 −12 −2 7 Plastic molding machine operators and tenders, setters and set-up operators 144 159 176 191 15 32 47 11 22 33 Hand workers, including assemblers and fabricators 2,528 2,067 2,266 2,430 −461 −262 −98 −18 −10 −4 Cannery workers 71 63 70 71 −8 −1 −1 −11 −2 −1 Cutters and trimmers, hand 63 59 65 69 −4 2 6 −6 3 10 Electrical and etectronic assemblers 237 119 134 144 −118 −103 −93 −50 −44 −39 Grinders and polishers, hand 84 67 74 80 −17 −11 −4 −21 −13 −5 Machine assemblers 47 37 41 45 −9 −5 −2 −20 −12 −4 SOURCE: G. Silvestri and J. Lukasiewicz. 1989. Monthly Labor Review (112:11):51-59.

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THE COMPETITIVE EDGE: Research Priorities for U.S. Manufacturing TABLE A-2 Projected Employment Change by Occupation, 1988-2000, Ranked by Absolute Change in Declining Industries (Numbers in Thousands) Occupation Projected 1988–2000 employment change   All industries All declining industries All growing industries Total, all occupations 17,120.1 −1,435.3 18,555.4 All other assemblers and fabricators −116.4 −113.1 −3.3 Farm workers −98.2 −108.5 10.2 Sewing machine operators, garment −90.7 96.1 5.4 Inspectors, testers, and graders, precision −41.7 −71.6 29.9 Electrical and electronic assemblers −103.3 −69.0 −34.3 All other helpers, laborers, and material movers, hand 70.2 −57.9 128.1 Blue-collar worker supervisors 124.1 −54.6 178.7 Hand packers and packagers −75.0 −48.8 −26.2 Secretaries, except legal and medical 383.9 −44.1 428.0 Electrical and electronic equipment assemblers, precision −70.2 −44.1 −26.1 Freight, stock, and material movers, hand 19.7 −37.6 57.3 All other machine operators, tenders, setters, and set-up operators −28.5 −34.1 5.6 Textile draw-out and winding machine operators and tenders −30.2 −30.8 .6 Packaging and filling machine operators and tenders −32.6 −30.1 −2.5 Child care workers, private household −28.1 −28.1 0 Industrial truck and tractor operators −21.4 −27.6 6.3 Machine feeders and offbearers −31.0 −26.0 −5.0 Welders and cutters −16.1 −24.8 8.7 Bookkeeping, accounting, and auditing clerks 40.3 −24.4 64.7 Machine forming operators and tenders, metal and plastic −18.4 −23.4 5.0 General managers and top executives 478.9 −22.5 501.4 All other hand workers −18.5 −19.6 1.1 All other mechanics, installers, and repairers −25.9 −17.7 −8.3 Gardeners and groundskeepers, except farm 149.4 −17.5 166.9 Janitors and cleaners, including maids and housekeeping cleaners 471.8 −16.8 488.6 Crushing and mixing machine operators and tenders −18.9 −15.8 −3.1 Sewing machine operators, nongarment −8.0 −15.3 7.2 Machine tool cutting operators and tenders, metal and plastic −14.9 −14.1 −.8 Typists and word processors −66.2 −13.3 −52.9 Welding machine setters, operators, and tenders −13.6 −13.0 −.6 Cleaners and servants, private household −12.6 −12.6 0 All other metal and plastic machine setters, operators, and related workers −11.5 −11.9 .3 General office clerks 454.3 −11.1 465.4 All other machine tool cutting and forming, etc. −4.3 −10.9 6.5 Chemical equipment controllers, operators, and tenders −10.8 −10.2 −.6 Sheet metal workers and duct installers 9.7 −10.1 19.8 SOURCE: G. Silvestri and J. Lukasiewicz. 1989. Monthly Labor Review (112:11):61.

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THE COMPETITIVE EDGE: Research Priorities for U.S. Manufacturing TABLE A-3 Percent Change in Employment for Selected Occupations, 1988-2000, and Percent of Employment Comprised by Whites, Blacks, and Hispanics, 1988     Percent comprised by– Occupation Percent change, 1988–2000 Whites Blacks Hispanics Total, all occupations 15 87 10 7 Executive, administrative, and managerial occupations 22 92 6 4 Professional specialty occupations 24 89 7 3 Engineers 25 90 4 3 Computer, mathematical, and operation research analysts 52 86 7 3 Natural scientists 19 90 3 3 Health diagnosing occupations 24 88 3 4 Health assessment occupations 38 87 8 3 Teachers, college 3 89 4 4 Teachers, except college 18 89 9 4 Lawyers and judges 30 96 2 2 Other professional workers 23 90 8 4 Technicians and related support occupations 32 86 9 4 Health technicians and technologists 34 81 14 4 Engineering and scientific technicians 22 89 7 5 All other technicians 39 88 7 4 Marketing and sales occupations 20 91 6 5 Administrative support occupations, including clerical 12 86 11 6 Clerical supervisors and managers 12 85 14 6 Computer operators and peripheral equipment operators 29 83 14 6 Secretaries, typists, and stenographers 10 89 8 5 Financial recordkeeping occupations 1 90 6 5 Mail clerks and messengers 10 74 22 9 Other clerical occupations 13 84 13 7 Service occupations 23 79 18 10 Private household workers −5 76 23 17 Protective service occupations 23 81 17 6 Food service occupations 23 83 12 10 Health service occupations 34 69 28 6 Cleaning service occupations 20 74 23 15 Personal service occupations 27 85 12 8 Precision production, craft, and repair occupations 10 90 8 8 Mechanics, installers, and repairers 13 91 7 8 Construction trades 16 91 7 8 Other precision production occupations 3 88 8 9 Operatives, fabricators, and laborers 1 82 15 11 Machine setters, set-up operators, operaters, and tenders −3 83 15 7 Transportation and material moving machine and vehicle operators 12 82 16 11 Helpers, laborers, and material movers, hand 2 82 15 13 Agriculture, forestry, fishing, and related workers −5 92 7 13 Note: Hispanics can be of any race. SOURCE: G. Silvestri and J. Lukasiewicz. 1989. Monthly Labor Review (112:11):64.

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THE COMPETITIVE EDGE: Research Priorities for U.S. Manufacturing TABLE A-4 Percent Distribution of Employment by Occupation, 1988 and Projected 2000 Alternatives     2000 Occupation 1988 Low Moderate High Total employment 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 Executive, administrative, and managerial occupations 10.2 10.8 10.8 10.9 Professional specialty occupations 12.4 13.4 13.3 13.2 Techicians and related support occupations 3.3 3.7 3.7 3.7 Marketing and sales occupations 11.3 11.6 11.7 11.6 Administrative support occupations, including clerical 17.8 17.4 17.3 17.3 Service occupations 15.6 16.7 16.6 16.4 Agriculture, forestry, fishing, and related occupations 3.0 2.4 2.4 2.5 Precision production, craft, and repair occupations 12.0 11.4 11.4 11.6 Operators, fabricators, and laborers 14.4 12.5 12.6 12.8 SOURCE: G. Silvestri and J. Lukasiewicz. 1989. Monthly Labor Review (112:11):65.