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APPENDIX G BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS DAVID W. Mc CALL received a B.S. degree in 1950 in physical chemistry from the University of Wichita and M.S. (1951) and Ph.D. (1953) degrees in chemistry from the University of Illinois. He has been with the AT&T Bell Laboratories since 1953, moving from head of physical chemistry to his present position (since 1973) as director of the chemical research laboratory. He is a member of the American Chemical Society and American Institute of Chemical Engineers and is also a member and fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Royal Society of Chemists. In 1984 he was elected to the National Academy of Engineering and has served on a number of Academy study programs. In April 1989, President Bush appointed him chairman of the National Commission on Superconductivity. His areas of expertise include nuclear magnetic resonance, diffusion in liquids, polymer relaxation, dielectric properties, and materials for communications systems. GENE M. AMDAHL received a B.S. degree in 1948 in engineering physics from South Dakota State University and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in 1952 in theoretical physics from Cornell University. He received honorary degrees of D.Eng. in 1974 from South Dakota State University and D.Sc. degrees in 1974 from the University of Wisconsin in Madison, in 1980 from Luther College (Iowa), and in 1984 from Augustana College (South Dakota). Prom 1951 to 1952 he served as research associate at the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (University of Wisconsin), from 1952 to 1955 as senior engineer at the International Business Machines Corporation, as a member of the technical staff in l9S6 at Ramo-Wooldridge, Inc., as laboratory manager from 1956 to 1960 at Aeronutronic, Inc., and as director of the computer R&D laboratory from 1960 to 1970 at IBM. He was president and chairman of the board of the Amdahl Corporation from 1970 to 1979. In 1980, he formed Trilogy Systems Corporation and served as chairman of the board until 1987, when he became chairman of the board of ELXSI Corporation. He founded ANDOR Systems Corporation in 1987 and serves as its president and chairman of the board. He was visiting professor from 1965 to 1967 at Stanford University, an IBM fellow from 1965 to 1971, and a lecturer at the NATO School in 1969 and in 1976. He has received numerous honors and awards and was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1967. He is a member of the American Physical Society and the Marconi Society (Italy) and is a member and fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and the British Computer Society. His areas of expertise include internal machine and system organization of very-high-speed computing systems and the measurement of the characteristics of the workload environment involved. 135

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136 DEBORAH D. L. CHUNG received a B.S. degree in engineering and applied science, her M.S. degree in engineering science in 1973 from the California Institute of Technology, and her S.M. degree in 1975 and Ph.D. degree in 1977 in materials science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She worked at Carnegie-Mellon University from 1977 to 1982 as assistant professor and from 1982 to 1986 as associate professor in metallurgical engineering and materials science. She moved to her current position in 1986 as professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at the State University of New York at Buffalo, where she also serves as director of the Composite Materials Research Laboratory. She was visiting scientist at the Francis Bitter National Magnet Laboratory from 1974 to 1977 and principal investigator on research projects for the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (1978 to 1983), for the National Science Foundation (1980-1984), for the Department of Energy (1986 to 1988), and for the Strategic Highway Research Program (1989~. In 1979 she received the Ladd Award from Carnegie-Mellon University, in 1980 the Hardy Gold Medal from the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers, and in 1987 the Teetor Educational Award from the Society of Automotive Engineers. She holds memberships in the American Carbon Society, ASM INTERNATIONAL, American Ceramic Society, and the Society of Automotive Engineers. Her areas of expertise include graphite, carbon fibers, polymer- matrix composites, metal-matrix composites, silicate materials, superconductors, electronic packaging, and plasma deposition. BARRY K. GILBERT received a B.S. degree in 1965 in electrical engineering from Purdue University and a Ph.D. degree in 1972 in physiology and biophysics from Mayo Graduate School of Medicine and the University of Minnesota. He worked as research assistant at the Mayo Clinic (Mayo Foundation) from 1971 to 1973 and moved through various staff and academic positions at the Mayo Foundation to his present position in 1978 as staff scientist at the Mayo Foundation (Department of Physiology and Biophysics). He was a National Institutes of Health Postdoctoral Fellow from 1972 to 1974. He is a member of the American Physiological Society and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and has served on the Materials Research Council of the Defense Advanced Research Analysis Agency since 1985. His areas of expertise include applications of engineering and computational methods to biomedical research and clinical medicine, design of high-performance signal processors, development of computer-aided design software for signal processors, and integrated circuit design. JACK HILIBRAND received a B . E . E ~ degree from City College of New York in 1951 and his Sc.D. degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1956. He joined the Radio Corporation of America and was a member of the technical staff at RCA Laboratories. In 1961 he transferred to the RCA Semiconductor Division, where he was involved in the design and development of s ilicon power transistors and MOS and bipolar integrated circuits. In 1971 he joined the RCA Government Systems Division, which is now part of GE Aerospace, where he is a principal staff scientist. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and a member of the American Physical Society. His areas of expertise include integrated circuit design and technology and IC packaging.

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137 DONALD C. HOPER received a B. S. degree in chemistry at Bethel College in 1961 and a Ph.D. degree in physical chemistry from the University of California in Davis in 1967, which was followed by postdoctoral work at the University of Illinois in Urbana from 1967 to 1969. At the University of Arizona in Tucson he was assistant professor from 1969 to 1974. He j oined the IBM Corporation staff in 1974, working first on fundamental studies of materials, then pursued interests in x-ray resists and mask technologies . In 1980, he went to the IBM San Jose Almaden Research Center where, in 1983' he became manager of the polymers for memory and logic group, and in 1988 he moved to New York as manager of advanced polymer materials. In 1989, he returned to the Almaden Research Center on the staff of the director. He is a member of the American Chemical Society. His areas of expertise include x-ray and W. resists and lithography, mask and alignment technologies, multilayer resists, polymer materials and process development for semiconductor chips and packaging, high- temperature polymers, microstructure of oriented polymers, stress in multilayer polymer-metal structures, and low-permeability chip encapsulants for packaging. JOSEPH C. LOGUE received his B.E.E. degree in 1944 and his M.E.E. in 1949 in electrical engineering from Cornell University, where he also was instructor over that period. He served as assistant professor (special assignment) from 1949 to 1951 at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. He joined IBM in 1951 as technical engineer and advanced through various managerial positions to director of packaging technology in 1986. He retired from IBM in 1988 and now serves as consultant to Lorex Industries, Inc., and other companies. In 1961 he received the IBM Invention Achievement Award and in 1964 the Outstanding Invention Award, and in 1971 he was made an IBM fellow. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1983. He is a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Society of the Sigma Xi and a member and fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. His areas of expertise include development and application of new discoveries to advanced digital computers and systems, solid-state devices, and electronic aids to aircraft navigation. SHIRO MATSUOKA received his M.E. degree in 1955 in mechanical engineering from Stevens Institute of Technology and his M.S.E. and Ph.D. degrees in 1957 and 1959 respectively in mechanical engineering from Princeton University. He was research assistant at Princeton University from 1955 to 1957. He joined AT&T Bell Laboratories in 1959 as ~ member of the technical staff and in 1974 moved to his present position as head of the plastics research and development department. He was lecturer at Stevens Institute cuff Technology from 1962 to 1964 and visiting professor from 1964 to 1971. Since 1977 he has been visiting professor at Rutgers University. In 1980 he received the International Award of the Society of Plastics Engineers, and in 1989 he was elected to the National Academy of Engineering. He is a member of the American Chemical Society and the Society of Rheology and a member and fellow of the American Phys ical Society and the Society of Plastics Engineers . His areas of expertise include mechanical, electrical, and morphological properties of high polymers and molecular relaxation phenomena.

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138 CONSTANTINE A. NEUGEBAUER received a B.S. degree in 1953 in physical chemistry from Union University and a Ph.D. degree in 1957 in chemistry from the University of Wisconsin in Madison. He joined the General Electric Company in 1957 as research associate and became manager of the semiconductor packaging program in 1976. He is a member of the American Physical Society, the American Vacuum Society, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He is currently chairman of the Semiconductor Research Corporation's Electronic Packaging Subcommittee. His areas of expertise include calorimetry, thermodynamics, structure and properties of thin films, large-scale integration, hybrids, power semiconductor packaging, and very- large-scale integration packaging. R. FABIAN W. PEASE received a B.A. degree in 1960 and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in 1964 in electrical engineering from Cambridge University. He was research fellow from 1963 to 1967 at Trinity College (Cambridge University) and was consultant to IBM from 1964 to 1967. He was on leave as a member of the technical staff at AT&T Bell Laboratories from 1967 to 1969. From 1964 to 1969, he moved from assistant professor to associate professor at the University of California in Berkeley. He was appointed to his present position as professor of electrical engineering at Stanford University in 1978. He is a member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. His areas of expertise include electron microscopy, and electron beam technology, digital encoding of television signals, microstructures and their applications, and high-density electronic circuitry. PAUL PENFIELD, JR., received a B.A. degree in 1955 in physics from Amherst College and his Sc.D. degree in 1960 in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He was a Ford Foundation fellow from 1960 to 1962 and a National Science Foundation senior fellow from 1966 to 1967. He joined the M.I.T. faculty after graduation as assistant professor and was appointed professor of electrical engineering in 1969. He also was director of the Microsystems Research Center at M.I.T. In 1989, he was made head of the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. He is a member of the American Physical Society and the Society of the Sigma Xi and a member and fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. His areas of expertise include varactors, solid-state microwave devices and circuits, electrodynamics of moving media, computer-aided circuit theory, and, most recently, VLSI and integrated circuits and systems. RICHARD L. SCHWOEBEL received a Bus. degree in 1953 in physics from Hamline University and a Ph.D. degree in 1962 in engineering physics from Cornell University. From 1955 to 1957 he was senior engineer at General Mills, Inc. In 1962 he j oined Sandia Laboratories as a staff member and moved up to his present position as director of components in 1988. In 1971 he was visiting professor at Cornell University. He is a member of the Society of the Sigma Xi and a member and fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Institute of Chemists. His areas of expertise include oxidation of metals, defect nature and transport of oxides, microgravimetry, electron microscopy and diffraction, crystal growth processes, surface morphology, and nuclear waste management.

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139 BARRY H. WHALEN received his B.S. degree in 1957, his M.S. degree in 1960, and his Ph.D. degree in 1962 , all in electrical engineering from the University of California in Berkeley, and he did postdoctorate work at the Institute for Advanced Studies from 1962 to 1963. He worked at TRW Corporation as manager of the software and data systems laboratory from 1969 to 1972, assistant to the electronics system division head from 1979 to 1980, and manager of the UHSIC program from 1980 to 1983. In 1984 he joined the Microelectronics and Computer Technology Corporation as vice president and director of the MCC semiconductor packaging and interconnection program. He has served on numerous university' professional society, and government boards and panels and was technical advisor to the Packard Commission. He was coinventor of the monolithic single-chip FFT process and the VHSIC window access memory chip. He is a member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and the Materials Research Society. His areas of expertise include IC design, microcomponent systems, electronic warfare signal processors, laser communications, one-micron VLSIs, wafer-scale integration, tape automatic bonding, and application of lasers to electronics assembly.