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Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Pane} Members and Staff EDWARD J. RINALDUCCI is professor of psychology and coor- dinator of the Engineering Psychology Program at the school of psychology of the Georgia Institute of Technology. Previously he held academic positions at the University of Virginia. His current research interests include both basic and applied aspects of vision research, illuminating engineering, human factors in transporta- tion systems (i.e., automobile and aircraft), and human spatial behavior. He is a member of the American Psychological Association, the Human Factors Society, the Optical Society of America, the Illuminating Engineering Society, the Association of Aviation Psychologists, the Psychonomic Society, and Sigma Xi. He received a BA degree in psychology from Lehigh University, an MA degree from the University of New Hampshire, and a PhD degree in psychology from the University of Rochester. JANET BERTINUSON is director of occupational health and safety for the Alberta Federation of Labour, and she serves on the Canadian Labour Congress National Health and Safety Committee and the Labour Canada Committee on the labeling of hazardous substances. Previously she was acting director of the Labor Occupational Health Program at the University of California, Berkeley, and health and safety associate for the Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers International Union. She has a BA degree from Clarke College and an MS degree in environmental health from the University of Cincinnati. ROBERT D. CAPLAN is senior study director at the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. His research interests and publications deal with psychosocial stressors, particularly in work settings, and how these stressors affect mental and physical health. He is a fellow of the Section on 237

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238 Epidemiology of the American Heart Association, a past officer of the Society for the Social Psychological Study of Social Issues (Division 9 of the American Psychological Association), and a former Fulbright scholar. He received a PhD degree in organizational psychology from the University of Michigan. ROBERT M. GUION is university professor of psychology at Bowling Green State University. He has been at Bowling Green since receiving his PhD in 1952, except for periods of leave to teach at the University of California, Berkeley, and the Univer- sity of New Mexico and to do research for the state of Hawaii and the Educational Testing Service. His research interests are pri- marily in the field of industrial and organizational psychology, more specifically in the study of fair employment practices in employee selection and employee compensation. He has served as chair of the Board of Scientific Affairs of the American Psycho- logical Association (APA) and has been the president of two divisions in the APA. He is editor of the Journal of Applied Psychology. He has twice received the James McKeen Cattell award for excellence in research design. He did his undergraduate work at the State University of Iowa and received a PhD degree from Purdue University. VINCENT M. KING is associate dean of the College of Optometry at Ferris State College. Previously he held faculty positions at Ohio State University and Pennsylvania College of Optometry. He has also served as chair man of the Commission on Ophthalmic Standards of the American Optometric Association and as the organization's representative on various American National Standards Institute committees charged with developing ophthal- mic standards. His research interests include study of the physio- logical bases of ocular and visually related discomfort. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Optometry and a member of the American Optometric Association and the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. He received a BSc degree in optometry and MSc and PhD degrees from Ohio State University. DAVID H. SLINKY is chief of the Laser Branch, Laser Microwave Division, of the U.S. Army Environmental Hygiene Agency at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. He has published widely on subjects related to laser hazards and is an editor of Health Physics. He is a subcommittee chairman on the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) committees on safe use of

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239 lasers and on safety of lights and lighting systems and is chairman of the safety committee of the Laser Institute of America. He was a U.S. delegate to the committee on lasers of the Inter- national Electrotechnical Commission and was also a participant in a meeting on lasers of the World Health Organization. He is a member of the Optical Society of America, the American Society of Photobiology, the Health Physics Society, the Society of Photo- Optical Instrumentation Engineers, the American Industrial Hygiene Association, the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, and the physical agent committee of the Ameri- can Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists. He received a BS degree in physics from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and an MS degree in physics from Emory University. STANLEY W. SMITH is professor emeritus at Ohio State Univer- sity. He participates in the university's sensory biophysics program and is a member of the zoology department and the Institute for Research in Vision. Previously he held research positions at the Engineering Psychology Laboratory and the Vision Research Laboratories of the Universty of Michigan. For the past 12 years most of his research has involved relationships between lighting variables, age, subjective ratings, and performance of common visual tasks such as reading and verifying columns of numbers. He serves on two technical committees, on visual performance and on visual environment, of the Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage. He received BA and MA degrees from Oberlin College and a PhD from the University of Michigan, all in psychology. HARRY L. SNYDER is professor of industrial engineering and operations research at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, where he established the human factors graduate program in 1970. Previously he held research positions at North American Rockwell Corporation and the Boeing Company. His research has focused on visual display evaluation and visual problems of an applied nature, and he has published extensively in the general human factors engineering field, with particular emphasis on visual performance. In 1981 he received the Paul M. Fitts Award from the Human Factors Society for his contributions to human factors education. He Is a fellow of the Human Factors Society, the Optical Society of America, and the American Psychological Association. He has served as president and as a member of the executive council of the Human Factors Society and editor of Human Factors. He received an AB degree from Brown University and MA and PhD degrees from Johns Hopkins University.

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240 ALFRED SOMMER is associate professor of ophthalmology, epi- demiology, and international health at Johns Hopkins University and director of the International Center for Epidemiologic and Preventive Ophthalmology, a World Health Organization Col- laborating Center for the Prevention of Blindness, in Baltimore. He also serves as medical advisor of Helen Keller International. His major research interests concern epidemiologic and public health analyses of ocular and blinding disorders. He has received the Helen Keller International Blindness Prevention Award. He is chairman of the Public Health Committee of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, has served on consultative and advisory bodies of the National Institutes of Health, the Institute on Nutrition and Aging, and the World Health Organization, and is a member of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, the Royal Society of Medicine, the Society for Epidemiologic Research, the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, the- American College of Preventive Medicine, and the American Public Health Association. He received a BS degree from Union College, an MD degree from Harvard Medical School, and an MHSc degree in epidemiology from the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. LAWRENCE W. STARK is a professor of physiological optics and engineering science at the University of California, Berkeley, and professor of neurology (neuroophthalmology) at the University of California Medical Center, San Francisco. Previously he was at Yale University School of Medicine and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His interest in neurological control systems has focused on eye movements and their role in vision. He is the author of Neurological Control Systems (1968) and more than 200 scientific articles. He received an AB degree from Columbia College and an MD degree from Albany Medical College. H. LEE TASK is a research physicist in the field of optics at the Human Engineering Division of the Air Force Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory. His research interests and work include display image quality measurement and assessment, helmet mounted displays, night vision imaging devices and aids, aircraft windscreen optical quality measurement, and human visual performance. He has authored many papers and articles and holds several patents in these and related areas. He is a member of the Optical Society of America and the Human Factors Society. He received a BS degree in physics from Ohio University, an MS degree in physics from Purdue University, and MS and PhD

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241 degrees in optical sciences from the University of Arizona Optical Sciences Center. HUGH R. TAYLOR is assistant professor of ophthalmology, epi- demiology, and international health at Johns Hopkins University and assistant director of the International Center for Epidemio- logic and Preventive Ophthalmology, a World Health Organization Collaborating Center for the Prevention of Blindness, in Balti- more. His major research interests concern the epidemiologic and public health analyses of ocular and blinding disorders and the immunopathogenesis of blinding ocular infections. He is currently a member of an expert advisory panel and a scientific working group of the World Health Organization, and he has served on consultative and advisory bodies of the National Institutes of Health; the International Vitamin A Consultative Group sponsored by the U.S. Agency for International Development; the National Health and Medical Research Council, Australia; and the World Health Organization. He has received the citation for clinical research given by Fight For Sight, Inc., and the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. He is a member of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, the American Medical Association, the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthal- mology, the Royal Australian College of Surgeons, the Royal Australian College of Ophthalmologists, and the Royal Society of Medicine. He received an MS-BS degree, a BMedSci degree, a DO degree, and an hID degree in ophthalmic eoidemiolo~v from the University of Melbourne. Of KEY DISMUKES is study director of the Committee on Vision and served as study director to the panel. His publications cover a range of topics in neuroscience and in science and public policy. He is a member of the International Brain Research Organization and the Society for Neuroscience, in which he has served on or chaired several committees. He received a BS degree from North Georgia College, an MA degree from Vanderbilt University, and a PhD degree in biophysics from Pennsylvania State University. BARBARA S. BROWN served as staff associate to the panel and is now research associate in the Institute of Medicine. Previously she held positions in several divisions of the National Research Council. She has a BA degree in psychology and zoology from George Washington University.

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