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APPENDIX A STATEMENT OF TASK The study committee will conduct a study of nuclear engineering education in the United States and recommend appropriate action to the sponsors of this study. The committee will perform the following tasks: o Characterize the status of nuclear engineering education in the United States. Take into account present faculty and student numbers, existing curricula, availability of research and scholarship/fellowship funds, and other factors as appropriate. 0 Estimate the supply and demand for undergraduate and graduate nuclear engineering in the United States over the near to mid-term (5 to 20 years). In so doing, take into account hiring patterns in the nuclear industry of both formally trained nuclear engineers and others trained in more traditional disciplines, such as mechanical engineering, and the ratio of advanced degree holders to baccalaureates being hired. Identify the roles, if any, of other programs in training individuals who will work in nuclear engineering, e.g., MEs, EEs, and physicists. Make this estimate for scenarios having various assumed trends in the nuclear power industry, the federal laboratories, the Navy, and the universities. 0 Address the spectrum of material that the nuclear engineering curriculum should cover and how it should relate to other allied disciplines. In so doing, consider the implications to the nuclear engineering curriculum of the perceptions that the nuclear power industries are afflicted with management deficiencies, construction problems, and ethical shortcomings. Examine the curriculums used in France, Japan, and other countries, as appropriate, for strengths that might be applicable in the United States. o Recommend appropriate actions to assure that the nation's needs for competent nuclear engineers at both the graduate and undergraduate levels are satisfied over the near and mid-term. Consider career opportunities, potential student base, research funding, and how to assure excellence in the student background in individual students. 85

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APPENDIX B BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES COMMITTEE ON NUCLEAR ENGINEERING EDUCATION GREGORY R. CHOPPIN (Chairman) R. O. Lawton Distinguished Professor of Chemistry, Florida State University Gregory Choppin has been with the chemistry faculty of Florida State University since 1956, where he is now R. O. Lawton Distinguished Professor of Chemistry. He received a B.S. in chemistry from Loyola University, a Ph.D. from the University of Texas, and honorary doctorate degrees from Loyola University (New Orleans) and Chalmers University of Technology (Sweden). Dr. Choppin has served as a visiting scientist at the Centre d' etude Nucleaire Moleculaire in Belgium and the European Transuranium Institute in West Germany, and as a visiting professor at the University of Liege and the Science University of Tokyo. He is a consultant for several Department of Energy national laboratories and is a specialist in actinide and lanthanide chemistry. He serves on the editorial boards of eight scientific journals and has won national awards in nuclear chemistry, actinide separations, and chemical education. PATRICIA A. BAISDEN Group Leader, Inorganic Chemistry Group, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Patricia Baisden is group leader of the Inorganic Chemistry Group at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, conducting applied research in inorganic chemistry and radiochemistry. She received a B.S. in chemistry and a Ph.D. in physical inorganic chemistry from Florida State University, and did postdoctoral studies at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Dr. Baisder, is a member of Phi Beta Kappa and the American Chemical Society, and has served since 1983 87

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88 on the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Nuclear and Radiochemistry. Her research specialties are measurement of heavy element fission properties, solution chemistry of lanthanides and actinides, and heavy ion collisions leading to complete or incomplete fusion. WALLACE B. BEHNKE, JR. Vice Chairman of Commonwealth Edison Company (retired) and Consulting Engineer, Kiawah Island, South Carolina Wallace Behnke retired in July 1989 as Vice Chairman of Commonwealth Edison Company. He is currently a consulting engineer and is a registered professional engineer in Illinois. Mr. Behnke received the B.S. and B.S.E.E. degrees from Northwestern University. He is a director of Commonwealth Edison Company, of Duff and Phelps Selected Utilities, and of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). He is also a member of the Board of Governors of Argonne National Laboratory, the Advisory Committee for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, the Visiting Committee for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Department of Nuclear Engineering, and the U.S.-Japan Coordinating Committee for Development of Liquid Metal/Fast Breeder Reactors. He is a member and past president of the IEEE Power Engineering Society and of the Western Society of Engineers, and member of the National Academy of Engineering and the American Nuclear Society. A Fellow of IEEE, Mr. Behnke was elected Electric Industry Man of the Year in 1984 and received the John N. Landis Medal from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers in 1989. SUE E. BERRYMAN Director, National Center on Education and Employment Teachers College, Columbia University Sue Berryman is director of the National Center on Education and Employment at Teachers College, Columbia University, where she also serves as adjunct professor in the Division of Philosophy, Social Sciences, and Education. Prior to 1986 she was a behavioral scientist at the RAND Corporation. She received a B.A. from Pomona College and a Ph.D. from The Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Berryman is a member of Phi Beta Kappa. Her research interests include education and occupational mobility, including the career mobility of women who have doctorates in economics. JOHN W. CRAWFORD 2 JR. Consultant in Nuclear Engineering John Crawford is currently a member of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. He resigned from the committee in October 1989 on receiving that appointment. While a member of the committee he was a consultant in nuclear

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89 engineering. He received a B.S. degree from the United States Naval Academy and master's degrees from Massachusetts Institute of Technology both in naval construction and engineering and in physics. He served in the U.S. Department of Energy as Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for-Nuclear Energy from 1979 to 1981, during which time he was chairman of the board carrying out a comprehensive assessment of the safety of DOE nuclear reactors. He previously held various technical posts at DOE and its predecessor agencies relating to nuclear energy and naval reactors. He received the DOE Exceptional Service Medal. ARTHUR E. HUMPHREY Provost Emeritus, Lehigh University Prior to serving as Provost Emeritus at Lehigh University, Arthur Humphrey was director there of the Center for Molecular Bioscience and Biotechnology and adjunct professor of Chemical Engineering. He received B.S. and M.S. degrees from the University of Idaho, the Ph.D. in chemical engineering from Columbia University, and an M.S. degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Prior to 1980 he served at the University of Pennsylvania as a professor of chemical engineering and then as dean of its College of Engineering and Applied Science. Dr. Humphrey is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and was a Fulbright lecturer at the University of Tokyo and the University of New South Wales. His research interests include enzyme engineering, media sterilization, and the kinetics of the growth of cellular organisms . WILLIAM M. JACOBI Vice President, Westinghouse Electric Corporation William Jacobi became a vice president of Westinghouse Electric Corporation in 1986, and has served in his present post as vice president and general manager of government operations since 1988. In this capacity he directs all company activities in operating government-owned facilities. He joined Westinghouse in 1955 after receiving a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from Syracuse University. Subsequently he worked on the design of naval nuclear reactors, as engineering manager of the Fast Flux Test Facility, project manager for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor, and president of the Westinghouse Hanford Company. EDWIN E. KINTNER Executive Vice President, GPU Nuclear Corporation Edwin Kintner became Executive Vice President of GPU Nuclear Corporation in 1983. He has served as chairman of the Electric Power Research Institute's Nuclear Power Divisional Committee and is presently chairman of the Utility

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go Steering Committee for the Advanced Light Water Reactor Program. Prior to 1983 he directed the magnetic fusion program in the U.S. Department of Energy and its predecessor agency. He received a B.S. from the U.S. Naval Academy, and two M.S. degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, one in nuclear physics, the other in marine engineering. Mr. Kintner retired from the U.S. Navy as a Captain after serving in the area of nuclear propulsion of ships. His current activities emphasize providing uniform policies and operational criteria for the safe and effective operation of utility nuclear facilities. MILTON LEVENSON Bechtel Corporation (retired), now a Consulting Engineer, Menlo Park, California Milton Levenson, currently a consulting engineer, began his work with the committee while an Executive Engineer at the Bechtel Corporation, a position he held from 1981 to 1989. He was the first director of the nuclear power division of the Electric Power Research Institute from 1973 to 1980. From 1948 to 1973 he was with Argonne National Laboratory, leaving as Associate Laboratory Director for Energy and Environment. From 1944 to 1948 he worked at what is now the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. He received the a B.S. in chemical engineering from the University of Minnesota. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a past president of the American Nuclear Society, a member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers and the winner of its Robert E. Wilson award. GAIL H. MARCUS Office of Commissioner Kenneth Rogers, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Gail Marcus is currently Technical Assistant to Commissioner Kenneth Rogers at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). She joined the NRC in 1985, where she has served in research planning, policy formulation, and regulation development and oversight. Dr. Marcus received S.B. and S.M. degrees in physics and the Sc.D. degree in nuclear engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Prior to joining NRC she served as Assistant Chief, Science Policy Research Division, Congressional Research Service, as Deputy Manager, Support Services Division, Analytic Services, and as a physicist at the U.S. Army Electronics Command in the area of radiation damage to materials and devices. She is a member of the Visiting Committee for the Nuclear Engineering Department at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and for the nuclear engineering program at the University of Lowell, and is a fellow of the American Nuclear Society.

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91 WARREN F. MILLER, JR. Deputy Director, Los Alamos National Laboratory Warren Miller has served as Deputy Director of Los Alamos National Laboratory since 1986. Prior to that time he served there as Associate Director for Energy Programs and Associate Director for Physics and Mathematics. His areas of expertise include nuclear reactor physics and transport theory. He received a B.S. from the U.S. Military Academy and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in nuclear engineering from Northwestern University. Dr. Miller is a member of the nuclear engineering visiting committees of the University of California at Berkeley and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is a member of the Howard University Board of Trustees and many other educational and technical advisory committees, and is a fellow of the American Nuclear Society. ROBERT L. SEALE Head, Department of Nuclear and Energy Engineering, University of Arizona Robert Seale has served as head of the Department of Nuclear and Energy Engineering at the University of Arizona since 1969. He is a consultant to the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Sandia National Laboratories. He received a B.S. from the University of Houston and an M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Texas. Dr. Seale became a professor at the University of Arizona in 1961, prior to which he conducted research at General Dynamics. He is a registered professional engineer in Arizona and a member of the Education and Research Committee of Associated Western Universities. ROBERT E. UNRIG Distinguished Professor of Engineering and Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee Robert Uhrig has been Distinguished Professor of Engineering at the University of Tennessee in the Department of Nuclear Engineering since 1986. He also works as a Distinguished Scientist at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. He received a B.S. from the University of Illinois and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Iowa State University. Prior to 1986 Dr. Uhrig was an executive with Florida Power & Light Company and Dean of the College of Engineering at the University of Florida. He has also served as Deputy Assistant Director of Research for the U.S. Department of Defense.

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APPENDIX C COMMITTEE MEETNGS AND BRIEFINGS TO THE COMMITTEE First Meeting March 17-18, 1989 National Academy of Sciences Washington, D.C. Friday, March 17. 1989 PRESENTATIONS BY STUDY COSPONSORS Walter J. Coakley Institute of Nuclear Power Operations M. J. Ohanian University of Florida (on behalf of the American Nuclear Society) Richard E. Stephens U.S. Department of Energy Relationship of this study to INPO activities and needs Relationship of this study to ANS activities and needs Relationship of this study to DOE Office of Energy Research activities PRESENTATIONS ON BEHALF OF THE U.S. DEPARTMENT 0F ENERGY David M. Woodall Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Larry M. Blair Oak Ridge Associated Universities ~3 DOE nuclear engineering research support program Status of and outlook for the nuclear engineering labor markets

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94 William M. Porter U.S. Department of Energy PANEL DISCUSSION SPEAKER Identifying and developing U.S. technical expertise for participating in international nuclear organizations Identification of key study issues by the above speakers F. Karl Willenbrock American Society for Engineering Education Thursday, May 18~ 1989 A Commentary on Engineering Education in the United States and Abroad Second Meeting May 18-19, 1989 National Academy of Sciences Washington, D.C. PANEL DISCUSSION ON PERSONNEL SUPPLY ISSUES K. Lee Peddicord Texas A&M University Thomas G. Williamson University of Virginia Barclay G. Jones University of Illinois (Prior chairman, past chairman, and chairman, respectively, of the Nuclear Engineering Department Heads Organization) v v PANEL DISCUSSION ON PERSONNEL DEMAND ISSUES Richard J. Slember Westinghouse Electric Corporation Robert H. Stone Bechtel Power Corporation Walter B. Loewenstein Electric Power Research Institute

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95 JOINT_PANEL DISCUSSION ON STUDY-RELATED ISSUES Discussion of key study issues by members of both panels and the committee SPEAKER Richard Berendzen American University Friday, May 19. 1989 Robert L. Long GPU Nuclear Monday, July 24. 1989 Problems and Solutions in U.S. Technical Work Force Preparedness The accreditation process for U.S. engineering programs Third Meeting July 23-25, 1989 Bechtel Engineering Center, University of California Berkeley, California Kenneth C. Rogers Nuclear Regulatory Commission T. Kenneth Fowler University of California at Berkeley Projected NRC personnel needs . . . . In nuc. ear engineering Remarks and tour of the nuclear engineering laboratory Fourth Meeting September 7-8, 1989 National Academy of Sciences Washington, D.C. Fifth Meeting November 13-14, 1989 National Academy of Sciences Washington, D.C. Sixth Meeting March 8-9, 1990 National Academy of Sciences Washington, D.C.

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144 LETTER SENT TO NUCLEAR ENGINEERING DEPARTMENTS AND PROGRAMS Committee on Nuclear Engineering Education Dear May 2, 1989 The Commission on Engineering and Technical Systems of the National Research Council is engaged in a study of nuclear engineering education in the United States. The Statement of Task for this study and the roster of the study committee are enclosed for your information. The study is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations, and the American Nuclear Society. The objectives of this study are to evaluate the present status of nuclear engineering education, to estimate future needs in that area for the next 5, 10, and 20 years, and to recommend appropriate actions that might be important to assure that the nation's needs for engineers with nuclear skills will be met. This letter is to seek your assistance in obtaining some essential information toward achieving the first of these objectives. For that purpose, a subcommittee under Professor Robert L. Seale has drawn up the enclosed questionnaire. The questionnaire was formulated because the subcommittee recognized that, although U.S. educational programs in nuclear engineering education are similar in many respects, they differ widely. We ask your patience and cooperation in responding to the questions. In so doing, please be sure to provide your personal insights and identify unique features of your program. In order to meet study schedules, please send your response by May 20, 1989 to Dr. Seale, who is Head, Department of Nuclear and Energy Engineering, University of ARizona, Tucson, Arizona 95721. If you have questions, please call him at (602) 621-2311. Thank you for your cooperation. Sincerely, Robert Cohen Senior Program Officer Enclosures as stated

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145 NUCLEAR ENGINEERING PROGRAM QUESTIONNAIRE University. Department: Address: Provide a brief description of the organizational status of your program. Is your program in an independent department or is it part of a multi-discipline department? PART I: Current Profile of Nuclear Engineering Program UNDERGRADUATE Please note that much of the information requested below is in the same format as that used in the current ABET Accreditation Report that is filed prior to an accreditation visit. Hopefully this will simplify the task of preparing this information. We appreciate your help. ENGINEERING ENROLLMENT AND DEGREE DATA Undergraduate enrollment will be taken from the DOE sponsored Oak Ridge Associated Universities survey. An updated version is due out shortly. Based on present facilities and staffing levels, what annual enrollment levels could your program accommodate? What is the minimum SAT or ACT mathematics score that students need for success in your B. S. Nuclear Engineering program? What is the minimum SAT or ACT verbal score that students need for success in your B. S. Nuclear Engineering program? Where did your B.S. graduates of the last 5 years go? Employer Number Percent Graduate school Utilities National Laboratories Reactor Vendors Consultants DOE NRC DOE Contractors Military Services Other

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146 GRADUATE Graduate enrollment data will be taken from the DOE sponsored Oak Ridge Associated Universities survey. An updated version is due shortly. What are the undergraduate disciplines of the students that enter your graduate program? (Base your answer on the last 5 years enrollment. % NE % ME, % EE, % CE, % ChE, , % Other Engr, % Phys, % Math, % Chem, ~ Other. Based on current facilities and staffing levels, what graduate enrollment could your program accommodate? What is the threshold GRE score of successful graduate students in your program? Where do your M.S. and Ph.D. graduates of the last 5 years go? Employer Number Percent Utilities National Laboratories Reactor Vendors Consultants DOE NRC DOE Contractors Academic Career Other What special efforts are used to recruit new students to your program? Please identify faculty or department efforts separately from those of student organizations. What student activities or organizational affiliations are there for your Nuclear Engineering students? What is the approximate Nuclear Engineering portion of the total enrollment in the College of Engineering (or equivalent unit) of your institution? %

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147 NUCLEAR ENGINEERING PERSONNEL AND STUDENTS 1988-89 Academic Year Administrative Faculty (tenure track) Other Faculty (non-tenure) Student Teaching Assts Student Research Assts Technicians Office/Clerical Others Undergraduate Students Graduate Students Expenditure Category Faculty Staff (Clerical) Staff (Technician) Operations Travel Equipment Institutional Funds Gifts and Grants Grad Teaching Assts. Grad Research Assts. Head Count FT PT FTE NUCLEAR ENGINEERING EXPENDITURES Year 1984-85 1985-86 1986-87 List the major facilities and laboratories available and research in your Nuclear Engineering program. Ratio to Faculty 1987-88 1988-89 for instruction What computing facilities are available in support of your program?

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148 Part II: Profile of Present Faculty RESEARCH INTERESTS OF FACULTY Name Highest Rank Age Years Specialty Degree Teaching Research/Consulting Comment on the rank distribution of your faculty Comment on the age distribution of your faculty: . Comment on the strengths and weaknesses of your faculty: Identify special awards received in the last 5 years by members of your faculty: Are there deficiencies in the range of specialties covered by the faculty in your department?

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149 PART III: Degree Programs UNDERGRADUATE Curriculum Elements Basic Sciences and Mathematics Mathematics: Calculus Differential Equations Advanced Engineering Math Physics: Chemistry: Introductory Physics with Calculus Atomic & Nuclear Physics Introductory Chemistry Advanced Chemistry Other Courses Computer Programming Engineering Sciences Engineering Mechanics Statics Dynamics Fluid Mechanics Materials: . Strength of Materials Metallurgy/Materials Science Thermal Sciences: Thermodynamics Heat Transfer Electricity and Magnetism Circuits Electronics Nuclear Sciences: . Nuclear Physics Radiation Interaction Reactor Physics Fusion Credit Hrs Lec/Lab Status Req/Elec

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150 Curriculum Elements (cons) Applied Science and Design Radiation Detection & Instrumentation Health Physics Radiation Effects System Dynamics Thermal Hydraulics Reactor Engineering Nuclear Fuel Cycle Systems Design Other courses Comments: Credit Hrs Lec/Lab Status Req/Elec Humanities & Social Sciences Economics Communication Skills English Composition Technical Writing Special Requirements Comparison of Nuclear Engineering program with other disciplines in your institution. Indicate the required number of credit hours of each of the listed areas. Degree Program Mech Engr Elec Engr Civil Engr Indus Engr Aero Engr Matl Sci/Engr Nucl Engr Requirements in Credit Hours Mechanics Thermal Elec. & Physics Chemistry Sciences Electronics

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-151 GRADUATE Advanced Degree Requirements Degree Course Units Research Thesis Average Time Beyond B. S. or Dissertation Required Beyond B. S Masters Doctorate What are the most common minors for your graduate students? order of decreasing popularity. Graduate Courses in Nuclear Engineering . List in the Course Name of CourseCore/Elective Last Number Year Masters: C/ETaught Course Name of Course Number Doctorate: Core/Elective Last Year C/E Taught

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152 Part IV: Research Activities in Nuclear Engineering SUMMARY OF RESEARCH IN NUCLEAR ENGINEERING Name of Research Topic Personnel-FTE Fac. Res Comment on the trend in research. . Asst. Support Agency Support Dollars Comment on the research climate as you see it at the present time. Your successes and frustrations in seeking funding are both of interest. Please be specific as general statements convey dissatisfaction but do not really suggest solutions or alternatives. Part V: Industrial Interaction Discuss the extent of industrial interaction with your faculty including instruction, consulting, and research. Discuss the extent of industrial interaction and support of your student including scholarships, fellowships, summer employment, coop, etc.

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153 Part VI: Summary Based on impressions gained from contact with your students, please identify any consistent factors or influences that may have influenced their career choice. These might include role models, advisors at any level in school, interest in a specific technology, or a personal perception of the opportunity. Be as specific as you can. Please make any comments you may wish to contribute to the deliberations of the Committee on Nuclear Engineering Education of the Energy Engineering Board of the National Research Council. Either add to this questionnaire or write a separate letter. We need and welcome your thoughts and insights. Comments:

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