Appendix B

Biographies of Symposium Chairs and Presenters

Charles M. Vest is President of the National Academy of Engineering and President Emeritus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Vest earned a B.S. in mechanical engineering from West Virginia University in 1963, and M.S.E. and PhD degrees in mechanical engineering from the University of Michigan in 1964 and 1967 respectively. He joined the faculty of the University of Michigan as an assistant professor in 1968 where he taught in the areas of heat transfer, thermodynamics, and fluid mechanic, and conducted research in heat transfer and engineering applications of laser optics and holography. He and his graduate students developed techniques for making quantitative measurements of various properties and motions from holographic interferograms, especially the measurement of three-dimensional temperature and density fields using computer tomography. He became an associate professor in 1972 and a full professor in 1977.

In 1981 Dr. Vest turned much of his attention to academic administration at the University of Michigan, serving as associate dean of engineering from 1981-86, dean of engineering from 1986-1989, when he became provost and vice president for academic affairs. In 1990 he became president of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and served in that position until December 2004. He then became professor and president emeritus. As president of MIT, he was active in science, technology, and innovation policy; building partnerships among academia, government and industry; and championing the importance of open, global scientific communication, travel, and sharing of intellectual resources. During his tenure, MIT launched its OpenCourseWare (OCW) initiative; co-founded the Alliance for Global Sustainability; enhanced the racial, gender, and cultural diversity of its students and faculty; established major new institutes in neuroscience and genomic medicine; and redeveloped much of its campus.

He was a director of DuPont for 14 years and of IBM for 13 years; was vice chair of the U.S. Council on Competitiveness for eight years; and served on various federal committees and commissions, including the President’s Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) during the Clinton and Bush administrations, the Commission on the Intelligence Capabilities of the United States Regarding Weapons of Mass Destruction, the Secretary of Education’s Commission on the Future of Higher Education, the Secretary of State’s Advisory Committee on Transformational Diplomacy and the Rice-Chertoff Secure Borders and Open Doors Advisory Committee. He serves on the boards of several non-profit organizations and foundations devoted to education, science, and technology. In July 2007 he was elected to serve as president of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering (NAE) for six years. He has authored a book on holographic interferometry, and two books on higher education. He has received honorary doctoral degrees from fourteen universities, and was awarded the 2006 National Medal of Technology by President Bush.

Barbara Andrews is Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology at the University of Chile in Santiago and a member of the Millennium Institute for Cell Dynamics and Biotechnology (ICDB). She has a BSc in Biochemistry and a PhD (Biochemical Engineering) from the University of London. Before joining the Department in Santiago 14 years ago, Barbara worked at Columbia University in New York and the University of Reading in the UK. Her main research interests include metabolic engineering, protein separations and purification, cold-adapted enzymes. She is a member of the ICSU Strategic Coordinating Committee on Data and Information (SCCID).

Victoria Bakhtina has over 10 years of experience devising portfolio and risk solutions and managing projects requiring collaboration across sectors, regions, and disciplines. She manages a corporate



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Appendix B Biographies of Symposium Chairs and Presenters Charles M. Vest is President of the National Academy of Engineering and President Emeritus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Vest earned a B.S. in mechanical engineering from West Virginia University in 1963, and M.S.E. and PhD degrees in mechanical engineering from the University of Michigan in 1964 and 1967 respectively. He joined the faculty of the University of Michigan as an assistant professor in 1968 where he taught in the areas of heat transfer, thermodynamics, and fluid mechanic, and conducted research in heat transfer and engineering applications of laser optics and holography. He and his graduate students developed techniques for making quantitative measurements of various properties and motions from holographic interferograms, especially the measurement of three- dimensional temperature and density fields using computer tomography. He became an associate professor in 1972 and a full professor in 1977. In 1981 Dr. Vest turned much of his attention to academic administration at the University of Michigan, serving as associate dean of engineering from 1981-86, dean of engineering from 1986-1989, when he became provost and vice president for academic affairs. In 1990 he became president of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and served in that position until December 2004. He then became professor and president emeritus. As president of MIT, he was active in science, technology, and innovation policy; building partnerships among academia, government and industry; and championing the importance of open, global scientific communication, travel, and sharing of intellectual resources. During his tenure, MIT launched its OpenCourseWare (OCW) initiative; co-founded the Alliance for Global Sustainability; enhanced the racial, gender, and cultural diversity of its students and faculty; established major new institutes in neuroscience and genomic medicine; and redeveloped much of its campus. He was a director of DuPont for 14 years and of IBM for 13 years; was vice chair of the U.S. Council on Competitiveness for eight years; and served on various federal committees and commissions, including the President’s Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) during the Clinton and Bush administrations, the Commission on the Intelligence Capabilities of the United States Regarding Weapons of Mass Destruction, the Secretary of Education’s Commission on the Future of Higher Education, the Secretary of State’s Advisory Committee on Transformational Diplomacy and the Rice-Chertoff Secure Borders and Open Doors Advisory Committee. He serves on the boards of several non-profit organizations and foundations devoted to education, science, and technology. In July 2007 he was elected to serve as president of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering (NAE) for six years. He has authored a book on holographic interferometry, and two books on higher education. He has received honorary doctoral degrees from fourteen universities, and was awarded the 2006 National Medal of Technology by President Bush. Barbara Andrews is Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology at the University of Chile in Santiago and a member of the Millennium Institute for Cell Dynamics and Biotechnology (ICDB). She has a BSc in Biochemistry and a PhD (Biochemical Engineering) from the University of London. Before joining the Department in Santiago 14 years ago, Barbara worked at Columbia University in New York and the University of Reading in the UK. Her main research interests include metabolic engineering, protein separations and purification, cold-adapted enzymes. She is a member of the ICSU Strategic Coordinating Committee on Data and Information (SCCID). Victoria Bakhtina has over 10 years of experience devising portfolio and risk solutions and managing projects requiring collaboration across sectors, regions, and disciplines. She manages a corporate 151

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152 THE CASE FOR INTERNATIONAL SHARING OF SCIENTIFIC DATA Portfolio Screening initiative, addressing integrity of information for key portfolio areas, and leads an innovative Portfolio Management e-learning development. In addition, Dr. Bakhtina has worked in the areas of portfolio performance analysis (including applications to a corporate incentive program), credit research and rating performance, and loan recovery analysis. She has also built models for client financial reporting and compliance analysis. During the last five years, her scientific interests have been related to Risk Management, Sustainable Development, Knowledge Management, Innovation, and Leadership. Dr. Bakhtina holds the equivalent of a Bachelors and Masters in Applied Mathematics and Composite Materials Mechanics from Lomonosov Moscow State University, a Ph.D. in Applied Mathematical Education from Moscow State Pedagogical University, a MBA in Business and Finance from Waynesburg University, and a certificate in Credit Risk Modeling from Stanford University. Ms. Bakhtina is an active member of CODATA Germany, and has a series of publications in the area of Sustainability and Developmental Risks. Roberta Balstad is Co-chair of the Board on Research Data and Information of the National Research Council. She is also chair of the US National Committee on Scientific Data and Information (CODATA), a Trustee of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), and a member of the Governing Board of the National Center for Earthquake Engineering Simulation. She is Editor-in-Chief of Weather, Climate, and Society, a journal of the American Meteorological Society, and a Special Research Scientist at Columbia University’s Center for Research on Environmental Decisions. She has also served as Director of CIESIN (Center for International Earth Science Information Network), Columbia University, and as President/CEO of the organization before it moved to Columbia. Dr. Balstad chaired the international committee that prepared a strategic plan on data and information for the International Council of Science (ICSU) and serves on that organization’s Committee on Science and Policy Research (CSPR). Her publications focus on the role of the social sciences in understanding global environmental change, data policy and scientific research, information technology in science, and the social applications of remote sensing data. She was awarded the Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota in 1974. Dr. Balstad was previously the Director of the Division of Social and Economic Sciences at the National Science Foundation and the founding Executive Director of the Consortium of Social Science Associations (COSSA). Vanderlei Canhos is the president director of the Reference Center on Environmental Information (CRIA) a non-governmental not-for-profit organization devoted to making biodiversity data freely and openly available via the Internet. Dr. Canhos has a B.S and a M.s. from the State University of Campinas (UNICAMP) and a Ph.D. degree from Oregon State University (OSU). His early scientific research was focused on microbial systematics at the State University of Campinas (UNICAMP). In the 1990´s his work was focused on microbial collection management at the Tropical Culture Collection(CCT), and biodiversity databases at the Tropical Database(BDT). During the last 10 years his work on the development of strategies and policies for the consolidation of biological collections and biodiversity databases in Brazil and Latin America. He contributed to the design and implementation of the Inter-American Biodiversity Information Network (IABIN), the Virtual Institute of Biodiversity (Biota-Fapesp Program), and in the implementation of the Brazilian Network of Biological Resource Centers. As a consultant to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) he contributed to the development of the Best Practices Guidelines for the Operation and Management of Biological Resources Centers. He was the project leader of the speciesLink network (http://splink.cria.org.br/) and openModeler (http:// openmodeller.sourceforge.net/) a computational environment for ecological niche modeling. speciesLink currently integrates more than 4

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APPENDIX B 153 million records from biological collections (botanical and zoological specimens and microbial strain data of samples collected in Brazil). His current work includes the assessment of initiatives worldwide to improve data release and analysis. He is a member of the Board of Directors of Species2000 (Catalogue of Life), the Board of Directors of ETI Bioinformatics (University of Amsterdam) and of the Advisory Board of Global Research Data Infrastructures (GRDI 2020). David Carlson has served as Director of the Atmospheric Technology Division of the US National Centre for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Colorado for nine years between 1994-2003. Prior to that he was for three years the Director of the office coordinating the 'Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean - Atmosphere Response Experiment' (TOGA COARE) leading oceanic and atmospheric scientists from twelve nations in a large ICSU/WMO climate research programme. He was appointed to the post of Director of the International Polar Year 2007-2008 International Programme Office (IPO) in June 2006. David is originally from the mid west of the United States and holds a PhD in Oceanography from the University of Maine. Daniel I. Cheney is Manager of Safety Programs for the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration’s Transport Airplane Directorate. Mr. Cheney has been involved in nearly all aspects of certification activities of Boeing commercial airplanes from the B707, through current activities of the B787 program. He has also been involved in supporting numerous accident and incident investigations, and their resolution. It has been through his involvement in accident investigation, and the realization that costly lessons from major accidents were being lost through the passage of time, that led Mr. Cheney to initiate FAA’s development of the web-based “Lessons Learned from Transport Airplane Accidents” knowledge information system. This accident library, now containing 57 accident modules, is available to the public on the FAA’s main web site at http://accidents-ll.faa.gov/. Farouk El-Baz is Research Professor and Director of the Center for Remote Sensing at Boston University. He participated in NASA’s Apollo program (1967-72) as secretary of the lunar landing site selection committee, and chairman of astronaut training in visual observations and photography. In 1973- 82 he established and directed the Center for Earth and Planetary Studies at the National Air and Space Museum of the Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC and served as Principal Investigator of the Earth Observations and Photography Experiment on the Apollo-Soyuz mission of 1975. He became Vice President for Science and Technology at Itek Optical Systems in 1982, before joining Boston University in 1986. He pioneered the applications of space photography to desert studies, with emphasis on groundwater concentration. He served in 1978-1981 as science adviser to Anwar Sadat, the late President of Egypt. His honors include NASA’s Apollo Achievement Award, the Nevada Medal, and the Egyptian Order of Merit - First Class. He served for six years as chair of the U.S National Committee for the International Union of Geological Sciences of the National Academies, and is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering. Stephen M. Griffin is a Program Director in the Division of Information and Intelligent Systems at the National Science Foundation (NSF). For the period 1994-2004, Mr. Griffin managed the Special Projects Program that included the Interagency Digital Libraries Initiatives and the International Digital Libraries Collaborative Research and Applications Testbeds program. He has been active in working groups for Federal high performance computing and communications programs, and serves on numerous domestic and international advisory committees related to digital libraries and advanced computing and networking infrastructure. In 2004-2005 he was on special assignment to the Library of Congress, Office of Strategic Initiatives, to assist with the National Digital Information and Infrastructure Preservation Program. He is

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154 THE CASE FOR INTERNATIONAL SHARING OF SCIENTIFIC DATA currently again on assignment to the Library of Congress as a Visiting Scientist and advisor to the Associate Librarian for Strategic Initiatives and Senior Staff. His research interests include interdisciplinary scholarly communication, cultural heritage informatics and data-intensive scholarship. Bengt Gustafsson is a Swedish astronomer and professor in theoretical astrophysics with stellar physics as is main are of research at Uppsala University. He is known for his work in uniting cosmic science with culture and theology, and questioning space science from a humanistic point of view. In 2002, Bengt was awarded the grand prize of the Royal Institute of Technology, and has also been awarded the grand prize of Längmanska kulturfonden. At one point during his career, he was a counselor working for the government of Sweden. He is a member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences and the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters. Haswira Nor Mohamad Hashim is a PhD Candidate at the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) Faculty of Law, Brisbane, Australia. He holds a Bachelor and a Masters of Law degrees and is a legal academic at MARA University of Technology, Shah Alam, in his native country, Malaysia. Since 2010, Haswira has worked on his doctoral research project under the supervision of Professors Anne Fitzgerald and Brian Fitzgerald at QUT. His doctoral research is examining the policy framework supporting open access to and reuse of publicly funded research data and information in Malaysian public universities. John L. "Jack" Hayes is the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Assistant Administrator for Weather Services and National Weather Service (NWS) Director. In this role, Dr. Hayes is responsible for an integrated weather services program, supporting the delivery of a variety of weather, water, and climate services to government, industry, and the general public, including the preparation and delivery of weather warnings and predictions, and the exchange of data products and forecasts with international organizations. Dr. Hayes returned to the NWS in 2007 after serving as the director of the World Weather Watch Department at the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), a specialized agency of the United Nations located in Geneva, Switzerland. In that position, he was responsible for global weather observing, weather data exchange telecommunications, and weather data processing and forecasting systems. Before joining the WMO, Dr. Hayes served in several senior executive positions at NOAA. As the Deputy Assistant Administrator for NOAA Research, he was responsible for the management of research programs. As Deputy Assistant Administrator of the National Ocean Service (NOS), he was the chief operating officer dealing with a multitude of ocean and coastal challenges, including the NOS response to the Hurricane Katrina disaster in August 2005. As Director of the Office of Science and Technology for the NWS, Dr. Hayes had oversight of the infusion of new science and technology essential to weather service operations. Dr. Hayes was also an executive in the private sector and the military. He was general manager of the Automated Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS) program at Litton-PRC from 1998 through 2000. AWIPS is the backbone computer and telecommunications system used by weather service forecasters at over 150 locations across the U.S. From 1970 through 1998, Dr. Hayes spent a career in the United States Air Force. He held a variety of positions, culminating his career as the Commander of the Air Force Weather Agency in the rank of Colonel. Dr. Hayes received both his Ph.D. and Master of Science degrees in meteorology from the Naval Post Graduate School in Monterey, California. A Fellow in the American Meteorological Society, he also graduated from Bowling Green State University, with a bachelor's degree in mathematics.

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APPENDIX B 155 Hilary Inyang is currently the Duke Energy Distinguished Professor of Environmental Engineering and Science, and Professor of Earth Science at the University of North Carolina, Charlotte, USA, while serving also as the Pro-term Chancellor and Board Chair of African Continental University Systems (ACUS) Initiative, Abuja, Nigeria. He is a former President of the African University of Science and Technology, Abuja, and Founding Director (2002–2009) of the Global Institute for Energy and Environmental Systems (GIEES) at the University of North Carolina-Charlotte. He is currently the President of the International Society for Environmental Geotechnology (ISEG) and the Global Alliance for Disaster Reduction (GADR). In 2008, he was selected as a Technical Judge of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. From 1997 to 2001, he was the Chair of the Environmental Engineering Committee of the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s Science Advisory Board, and also served on the Effluent Guidelines Committee of the United States National Council for Environmental Policy and Technology. From 1995 to 2000, he was the DuPont Young Professor/University Distinguished Professor at the University of Massachusetts, where he helped establish the university System’s Graduate School of Marine Science and Technology, while serving as the Founding Director of the Lowell-based Center for Environmental Engineering, Science and Technology. He has been an Honorary Professor/Concurrent Professor (China University of Mining and Technology, and Nanjing University) since 2004 and 1999, respectively. He has authored/co-authored more than 220 research articles, book chapters, and federal design manuals and the textbook, Geoenvironmental Engineering: principles and applications, published by Marcel Dekker (ISBN: 0-8247-0045-7). He is the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Energy Engineering of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), and has been associate editor/editorial board member of 27 refereed international journals and contributing editor of three books, including the United Nations Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems (Environmental Monitoring Section). Professor Inyang has served on more than 100 technical and policy panels of governments and professional societies, and has given more than 120 invited speeches and presentations on a variety of technical and policy issues at many institutions and agencies in several countries, Professor Inyang holds a Ph.D. with a double major in Geotechnical Engineering and Materials, and a minor in Mineral Resources from Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa, USA. Prof. Inyang was the first African-American to be endowed as a distinguished professor in environmental engineering in any university in the United States, and the first African immigrant to chair a U.S Congress-chattered permanent science committee of any U.S federal agency He has received many professional prizes and awards. Željko Ivezić is a professor in the Astronomy Department at the University of Washington. He holds a PhD in physics from the University of Kentucky, and B.Sc. degrees in physics and mechanical engineering from the University of Zagreb, Croatia. His research interests are in detection, analysis, and interpretation of electromagnetic radiation from astronomical objects, with emphasis on massive data sets and statistical analysis. He has co-authored over 250 refereed publications, with a cumulative citation count of over 40,000. He is one of the builders of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (www.sdss.org), and serves as the Project Scientist for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (www.lsst.org). Michael Kahn has contributed to science, education and innovation policy for over thirty years in strategy, policy, measurement, monitoring and evaluation of these fields. He has worked as advisor to the Ministers of Education, and Science and Technology, as Chief Director in the Gauteng Provincial Government, as education professor in Botswana and South Africa, as Executive Director in the Human Sciences Research Council, and as a consultant to many multilateral organizations. He presently serves as Research Fellow with the National Research Foundation, Honorary Research Fellow in the Centre for Research on Science and Technology of the University of Stellenbosch, and is Professor Extraordinaire of the Institute for Economic Research on Innovation of Tshwane University of Technology. Over 2010/11 he served as a member of the Ministerial Committee tasked to review South Africa's innovation system.

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156 THE CASE FOR INTERNATIONAL SHARING OF SCIENTIFIC DATA Gretchen Kalonji is the Assistant Director-General for Natural Sciences at the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization. Throughout her career, she has developed strong international links in science, in particular in China, India and the Pacific Region. She is strongly committed to promoting science in Africa and has worked with several African universities. Her work in educational transformation has taken her to university positions in France, Japan and China. In 2006, she was appointed a distinguished honorary professor at Sichuan University, Chengdu, and a visiting professor at Beijing's Qinghua University. Prior to 2005, she was the first women to hold an endowed chair – the Kyocera Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Washington (UW) Seattle, where she developed creative approaches to internationalization and to the transformation of science and engineering education. At UW, she led a campus-wide effort to integrate collaborative international research activities into the academic curriculum, across disciplines and from freshmen to doctoral level. This initiative, entitled UW Worldwide has been honored with multiple grants and awards, both in the United States and in partner regions. Prior to 1990, when she joined the University of Washington, she served as Assistant and Associate Professor in the Department of Material Science and Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Her work, both in materials science and in educational transformation, has been recognized by numerous awards and honors, including: the Presidential Young Investigator Award; the George E. Westinghouse Award from the American Society for Engineering Education; the Leadership Award from the International Network for Engineering Education and Research; and the National Science Foundation’s Director’s Award for Distinguished Teaching Scholars, the highest honor offered by the NSF. She has held visiting faculty appointments at numerous universities and institutes around the world, including the Max Planck Institute (Germany), the University of Paris (France), Tohoku University (Japan), and Sichuan University and Tsinghua University (China). She serves on numerous national and international advisory boards and committees, particularly for projects and organizations focusing on innovations in education, equity and access in higher education, and international science and engineering. She has been called upon to give more than 115 invited lectures in institutions around the world. Benjamin K. Mayala attended the University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania until 2002, obtaining a Bachelor of Science in Geomatics. He was employed by the National Institute for Medical Research (NIMR) in 2003 as a research scientist with expertise in health Geographic Information System (GIS). From 2005 to 2007, he pursued a Master of Science in GeoInformatics at the International Institute for GeoInformation Science and Earth Observation (ITC), Netherland. Mr. Mayala has applied his GIS expertise by mapping the geographical locations of health facilities in Tanzania. He has worked on various health mapping and infectious diseases surveillance. He has worked with NGOs, government institutions and international organizations on various projects and research that utilise GIS. For the past 3 years, he was a mentor and lecturer on approaches in applying GIS in health research for Masters Studies in Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Technician at Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Science in Tanzania. He is currently pursuing his Ph.D. at the University of Notre Dame in the Department of Biological Sciences. His project is focusing on the impact of climate on Change on Malaria in Tanzania, whereby he is going to use various algorithms to model the distribution of malaria in relation to climate variable. He is expecting to develop models that could be used as an early warning system for diseases prediction.

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APPENDIX B 157 Leonard Mboera works with the National Institute for Medical Research in Tanzania Chief Research Scientist and Director of Information Technology and Communication. He was born in November 21, 1957. He holds a Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine of the Sokoine University of Agriculture (1985), MSc of Applied Entomology (Veterinary/Medical Entomology) of the University of London in UK and a Diploma of Imperial College, London, UK (1991). He obtained his PhD (Chemical Ecology) from the Wageningen University and Research Centre in the Netherlands in 1999. He has worked as a Veterinary Surgeon at the Ministry of Agriculture, Zonal Research and Training Centre (1985-1992) before joining the National Institute for Medical Research in October 1992. In October 2002 he was appointed Director of Information Technology and Communication. His scientific contributions include: development and improvement of mosquito sampling techniques for host seeking and oviposition site selections; mosquito human attractants and oviposition attractants; research on malaria epidemics and development of malaria early warning systems; ecohealth and linkages between agriculture and malaria; research on knowledge systems; and infectious disease surveillance systems. Dr. Mboera is the Editor of Tanzania Journal of Health Research (2002- to-date); Associate Editor, East African Journal of Public Health (2004-to date); Member, Steering Committee, Global Outbreak Alert and Response Network (2003-2009); Coordinator, East African Integrated Disease Surveillance (2002- 2004); and Secretary General, East African Public Health Association (2003- to-date). He is an author of one book, two book chapters, 72 peer reviewed Journal publications and 26 scientific technical reports. Patricia Muñoz has a Bachelor of Information Sciences, and a Master’s Degree in Digital Documentation at the Universidad Pompeu Fabra, Spain. She is the Director of the Scientific Information Programme at the National Commission of Scientific and Technological Research (CONICYT). She has specialized in Scientific and Technological Information Management, acting as the representative of Chile in various international experts committees, participating in projects of national and international scope focused on strengthening and guaranteeing accessibility and visibility of scientific and technological knowledge. She has been the representative of Chile in ASFA (Aquatics Science Fisheries Abstracts) BOARD), a database management by FAO. Since 2004, she has been a member of the Group of Experts in Marine Information Management (GEMIN), of UNESCO’s International Oceans Commission. She is currently the Director of the Scientific Information Programme at CONICYT, where she develops and leads projects related to the accessibility and visibility of projects and results of funding instruments managed by CONICYT’s Programmes through the implementation of digital repositories with the purpose of guaranteeing accessibility and preservation of digital documents, and also implementing a portal with indicators of scientific productivity. Yasuhiro Murayama is a director of Integrated Science Data System Research Laboratory of National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT), Japan. He is in charge of WDS-IPO business in NICT and plays a role of liaison with ICSU and WDS-science committee. From 1999-2006 he had been a leader of Japan group of US-Japan joint program of Arctic middle-upper atmosphere observations in Alaska, and then he was appointed as a group leader of NICT's whole atmospheric remote sensing group in 2008-2011. He was awarded by Japan's Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology in 2007, for Internet use of high-quality Auroral image observation and live image distribution. Dr. Murayama received his Ph.D. from Kyoto University studying atmospheric dynamics using remote-sensing and sounding rocket techniques. Roger Pfister is Head of International Cooperation at the Swiss Academies of Arts and Sciences, the

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158 THE CASE FOR INTERNATIONAL SHARING OF SCIENTIFIC DATA umbrella organization of the four Swiss academies. With an office at the Swiss Academy of Sciences (SCNAT), a member of this umbrella organization and the International Council for Science (ICSU), he is also the Executive Secretary for the ICSU Committee on Freedom and Responsibility in the conduct of Science (CFRS). By formation, he is a political scientist and International Relations scholar. He did his graduate studies in contemporary history, with a focus on Africa, at the University of Berne, Switzerland, and at the Centre of West African Studies (CWAS), University of Birmingham, UK. He began his PhD at the Centre for International Studies (CIS) in Zurich, Switzerland, obtaining his degree from Rhodes University in Grahamstown, South Africa. In his doctoral thesis, he researched South Africa’s apartheid foreign relations with sub-Saharan African states. Following his studies, he was engaged in a network at the ETH Zurich that promoted the transfer of know-how to developing countries. Subsequently, in Fribourg, Switzerland, he directed the university’s Research Promotion Service. In that capacity, he was also involved in setting up social sciences research programs in the Western Balkans and in the South Caucasus. He has widely published on South Africa’s post-Apartheid foreign policy, the diplomacy in exile of the African National Congress (ANC), Africa’s international relations, and on the relevance of new information technologies for Africa. Atta-ur-Rahman is the first scientist from the Muslim world to have won the prestigious UNESCO Science Prize (1999) in the 35 year old history of the Prize. He was elected as Fellow of Royal Society (London) in July 2006 thereby becoming the one of the 4 scientists from the Muslim world to have ever won this honor conferred by the prestigious 360 year old scientific Society. He has been conferred honorary doctorate degrees by many universities including the degree of Doctor of Science (Sc.D.) by the Cambridge University (UK) (1987) and an honorary degree of Doctor of Education by Coventry University UK in November 2007, an honorary D.Sc. degree by Bradford University in 2010, and an honorary Ph.D. by Asian Institute of Technology in 2010. He was elected Honorary Life Fellow of Kings College, Cambridge University, UK in 2007. He was conferred the TWAS Prize for Institution Building in Durban, South Africa in October 2009 in recognition of his contributions for bringing about revolutionary changes in the higher education sector in Pakistan. He is President of Network of Academies of Sciences of Islamic Countries (NASIC) and the Vice- President (Central & South Asia) of the Academy of Sciences for the Developing World (TWAS) Council, and Foreign Fellow of Korean Academy of Sciences. He was the President of the Pakistan Academy of Sciences (2003-2006), and again elected the President of the Academy from 1st January 2011. He was the Federal Minister for Science and Technology (2000 to 2002), Federal Minister of Education (2002), and Chairman of the Higher Education Commission with the status of a Federal Minister from 2002-2008. Successive Governments of Pakistan have conferred four civil awards, including Tamgha-i-Imtiaz (1983), Sitara-i-Imtiaz (1991), Hilal-i-Imtiaz (1998), and the highest national civil award Nis-han-i-Imtiaz (2002), on him. The Austrian government also honored him with its high civil award (Grosse Goldene Ehrenzeischen am Bande" (2007) in recognition of his eminent contributions. He is presently the Coordinator General of COMSTECH, an OIC Ministerial Committee comprising the 57 Ministers of Science & Technology from 57 OIC member countries. He is also the Patron of International Centre of Chemical and Biological Sciences (which comprises a number of institutes, including the Husein Ebrahim Jamal Research Institute of Chemistry and the Dr. Panjwani Center of Molecular Medicine and Drug Development) at Karachi University.

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APPENDIX B 159 He obtained his Ph.D. in organic chemistry from Cambridge University (1968). He has over 843 publications in several fields of organic chemistry including 663 research publications, 18 patents, 103 books and 59 chapters in books published by major U.S. and European presses. Seventy four students have completed their Ph.D. degrees under his supervision. Donald R. Riley is Professor of Information Systems, Robert H. Smith School of Business, and Affiliate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, at the University of Maryland, College Park. He also serves as IT Fellow at the Southeastern Universities Research Association (SURA) in Washington, D.C. He is founding chair of the Board of Directors of the Internet Educational Equal Access Foundation (IEEAF – http://www.ieeaf.org/), and serves on the board of National LambdaRail (NLR), Inc. Dr. Riley is co- founder and co-chair of the annual Chinese American Network Symposium and was recognized in 2000 by the Chinese Academy of Sciences as “Senior Technical Advisor to China Science and Technology Network.” Dr. Riley was one of the founding members of the national Internet2 initiative; founded the Mid-Atlantic Crossroads (MAX) regional networking consortium, one of the largest Internet2 regional gigapops, hosting the NGIX-DC (Next Generation Internet Exchange) for the federal agency NGI R&D networks. He served as inaugural chair of the EDUCAUSE Board of Trustees and was one of the founders of the EDUCAUSE National Learning Infrastructure Initiative. From 1998 to 2003, Dr. Riley served as Vice President and CIO at the University of Maryland; from 1992 to 1998, he served in a similar capacity, Associate Vice President and CIO, at the University of Minnesota, where he also was a Professor of Mechanical Engineering from 1976 to 1998. Dr. Riley graduated from the Purdue University School of Mechanical Engineering with a B.S in 1969, an M.S. in 1970, and a Ph.D. in 1976. Jane E. Rovins is an Executive Director for the Integrated Research on Disaster Risk Programme and International Programme Office. She has worked as a consultant promoting risk reduction, mitigation planning and providing emergency management training throughout Asia, USA, Latin America and Africa; was a Professor for American Military University in the Emergency and Disaster Management Department; and a Disaster Assistance Employee with the U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for numerous disasters. Her specialties are disaster risk reduction, programme management, planning, organizational development, and education. She is a Certified Emergency Manager (CEM) and Florida Professional Emergency Manager (FPEM). Dr. Rovins is Scholarship Commission Chairman and Oceania/Asia CEM Commission Chair for the International Association of Emergency Managers (IAEM) and she is a Past-President of the Natural Hazard Mitigation Association and a member of the Board of Directors. She holds a Ph.D. in International Development from Tulane University Law School and is a graduate of Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine with a Master's degree in International Health and Complex Emergencies. John Rumble has over 30 years of experience managing scientific data organizations. He had nearly a quarter of a century of service with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and its Standard Reference Data Program. From 2004 to 2001, He was senior executive for Information International Associates (Oak Ridge TN) and in 2011 founded R&R Data Services (Gaithersburg MD). Rumble’s expertise in scientific data management and scientific informatics, as well as his broad scientific background, has expanded both company's breadth of experience and knowledge in managing scientific and technical information. At NIST, Rumble led development of scientific and technical databases. Under his leadership, NIST produced and sold more than 70 PC databases of scientific information, generating millions of dollars of

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160 THE CASE FOR INTERNATIONAL SHARING OF SCIENTIFIC DATA annual revenue. Dr. Rumble led NIST into the Internet and Web eras with the release of over 25 online data systems in virtually every area of science and engineering. When he left NIST, Rumble had oversight of direct customer service throughout the world as Chief of the NIST Measurement Services Division. The Division provides fee-based services to make instruments and measurements directly traceable to the fundamental units. It also provides critically evaluated databases in many areas of science and technology. During his time at NIST, he also worked closely with industry on database standards, including an international standard for industrial data exchange (ISO 10303). In 1998, he was elected President of the CODATA, the ICSU Committee on Data for Science and Technology), which is the leading international group for scientific and technical data. In addition to his service to CODATA, Dr. Rumble is a Fellow of the ASTM International, a Fellow of ASM International, a foreign member of the Russian Federation Academy of Metrology, a Fellow of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry, a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and recipient of the U.S. Department of Commerce Silver Medal. In 1993–94, Rumble was a Department of Commerce Fellow working in the Office of Science and Technology Policy in the Executive Office of the President. In 2006, Dr. Rumble was awarded the CODATA Prize for his accomplishments. He has written and lectured extensively on scientific data management. Dr. Rumble holds a Ph.D. in chemical physics from Indiana University. Daniel Schaffer is a senior communications specialist with TWAS, the academy of sciences for the developing world, in Trieste, Italy, a UNESCO-affiliated organization dedicated to building scientific capacity in the developing world. He has written on science and technology issues both in the developed and developing world for more than 20 years. Earlier in his career, he served as director of communications at the University of Tennessee's Energy, Environment and Resources Center and an editor and speechwriter for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in the United States. He has published books with Harvard University Press, Johns Hopkins University Press and World Scientific, and has produced educational programmes for WCBS-TV in New York City and award- winning documentaries aired on public television stations in the United States. He was the founding editor and editor-in-chief of Forum, a science policy journal published by the University of Tennessee, Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). He holds a Ph.D. from Rutgers University, USA, where he studied issues related to urban and suburban growth. Curtis E. Woodcock is a Professor in the Department of Geography and Environment at Boston University. His research specializations include remote sensing, particularly of land cover and land use change. He currently serves as the Team Leader of the USGS/NASA Landsat Science Team; Co-chairs the Land Cover Characteristics Implementation Team for GOFC-GOLD (Global Observations of Forests and Land Cover Dynamics); is a member of NASA’s Land Cover and Land Use Change Science Team. Huanming Yang co-founded BGI (formerly Beijing Genomics Institute) in 1999 and is currently its President and Professor. He and his collaborators have made a significant contribution to the Human Genome Project, the HapMap Project, and the 1000 Genomes Project, as well as to sequencing and analyzing genomes of the first Asian individual, rice, chicken, silkworm, giant panda, ant, cucumber, maize, soybean, and many microorganisms. Dr. Yang has received many awards and honors, including Research Leader of the Year by Scientific American in 2002 and Award in Biology by the Third World Academy of Sciences (TWAS) in 2006. He was elected as a Foreign Member of EMBO in 2006, an Academician of the Chinese Academy of Sciences in 2007, a Fellow of TWAS in 2008, and a Foreign Fellow of Indian National Science Academy in 2009. Tilahun Yilma is the Director and Distinguished Professor of Virology at the International Laboratory of Molecular Biology (ILMB) at UC Davis. He received all his undergraduate, veterinary school, and

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APPENDIX B 161 graduate degrees at UC Davis. Dr. Yilma has made major contributions in developing safe and efficacious viral vaccines for both animals and humans. He is noted for developing what the journal Nature described as one of the two outstanding vaccinia virus recombinant vaccines (rinderpest) in the world. Dr. Yilma has received many honors including the Ciba-Geigy award (highest international award in animal science), the UC Davis Faculty Research Award (highest research award), and UC Davis Distinguished Public Service Award (highest service award). Dr. Yilma is a member of the US National Academy of Sciences and a Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology. Dr. Yilma has served on the Council of the NIH-NCRR, NSF Advisory Committee for the Office of International Science and Engineering, and currently is a Member of the Scientific Advisory Board for Center for Bio-Security Science, Los Alamos National Lab. Dr. Yilma has worked with a number of International Organizations including the WHO, FAO, OIE, AU, and IAEA. He is a member of the Board of Trustees, Science for Peace, Fondazione Umberto Veronesi, Milan, Italy.