B Biographical Sketches

George T. Milkovich (Chair) is M.P. Catherwood professor in human resource management at the Center for Advanced Human Resource Studies in the School of Industrial and Labor Relations, Cornell University. He has authored over 100 publications dealing with a wide range of issues related to managing human resources. He serves as a consultant to major international corporations, consulting firms, and government agencies. Prior to obtaining a Ph.D. at the University of Minnesota, he was employed by Exxon and Honeywell in human resource management positions. He has also served on the board of editors of eight research journals. He has coauthored several books, including two leading textbooks: Compensation (third edition) and Human Resource Management (sixth edition).

James N. Baron is professor of organizational behavior, Business School Trust faculty fellow for 1990–1991 in the Graduate School of Business, and professor of sociology at Stanford University. He teaches and does research in the areas of complex organizations, human resource management, labor market and employment policy, and social inequality. His research has appeared in such journals as the American Sociological Review, the American Journal of Sociology, Administrative Science Quarterly, and American Economic Review. He has conducted studies of gender segregation and pay equity for the National Research Council. He has a B.A. from Reed College, an M.S. from the University of Wisconsin, and a Ph.D. from the University of California at Santa Barbara, all in sociology.



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Pay for Performance: Evaluating Performance Appraisal and Merit Pay B Biographical Sketches George T. Milkovich (Chair) is M.P. Catherwood professor in human resource management at the Center for Advanced Human Resource Studies in the School of Industrial and Labor Relations, Cornell University. He has authored over 100 publications dealing with a wide range of issues related to managing human resources. He serves as a consultant to major international corporations, consulting firms, and government agencies. Prior to obtaining a Ph.D. at the University of Minnesota, he was employed by Exxon and Honeywell in human resource management positions. He has also served on the board of editors of eight research journals. He has coauthored several books, including two leading textbooks: Compensation (third edition) and Human Resource Management (sixth edition). James N. Baron is professor of organizational behavior, Business School Trust faculty fellow for 1990–1991 in the Graduate School of Business, and professor of sociology at Stanford University. He teaches and does research in the areas of complex organizations, human resource management, labor market and employment policy, and social inequality. His research has appeared in such journals as the American Sociological Review, the American Journal of Sociology, Administrative Science Quarterly, and American Economic Review. He has conducted studies of gender segregation and pay equity for the National Research Council. He has a B.A. from Reed College, an M.S. from the University of Wisconsin, and a Ph.D. from the University of California at Santa Barbara, all in sociology.

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Pay for Performance: Evaluating Performance Appraisal and Merit Pay Michael Beer is professor of business administration at the Harvard Business School, where he teaches and does research in the area of human resource management, organizational effectiveness, and organizational change. He has a Ph.D. in psychology from Ohio State University. His most recent book, The Critical Path to Corporate Renewal, reports on a study of corporations attempting to revitalize themselves. He serves on the editorial boards of several journals, is a consultant to a number of Fortune 500 companies, and has served on the board of governors of the Academy of Management. Prior to joining the faculty at Harvard in 1975, Beer was director of organizational research and development at Corning Glass Works, where he led the company's efforts to innovate in the organization and management of human resources. Renae F. Broderick is currently a senior research associate at the Center for Advanced Human Resources Studies in the School of Industrial and Labor Relations at Cornell University. Previously she was a senior compensation consultant for The Wyatt Company, an assistant professor at the Anderson Graduate School of Management, University of California at Los Angeles, and on the corporate personnel policy and planning staff at General Motors Corporation. Her work experience has been in compensation and personnel planning, and her research interests center on the strategic use of compensation and other personnel systems in organizations and on international personnel issues. She has a B.A. in psychology from Macalester College, an M.A. from the University of Minnesota, and a Ph.D. from Cornell, in human resources/industrial relations. Charles C. Brown is professor of economics at the University of Michigan and program director at the Institute for Social Research. His research interests include a range of empirical issues regarding the workings of labor markets. In the past few years, he has been studying firms' choice of method of pay, the relationship between soldiers' performance and their propensity to reenlist in the Army, and differences in compensation and employment policies between large and small employers. His work has appeared in the American Economic Review, Journal of Political Economy, Quarterly Journal of Economics, Journal of Human Resources, and Industrial and Labor Relations Review. His book called Employers Large and Small (with James Medoff and Jay Hamilton) has recently been published by Harvard University Press. He has a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University. Thelma Crivens is assistant professor in the School of Industrial and Labor Relations at Cornell University. She received a master's degree in industrial and labor relations from Michigan State University and a law degree from George Washington University. Crivens teaches labor law relating to the federal and private sectors and employment discrimination. Her areas of research are in labor law and employment discrimination.

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Pay for Performance: Evaluating Performance Appraisal and Merit Pay Charles E. Fiero is co-chairman of MLR Enterprises, Inc., a communications holding company with investments in newspapers and magazines. Prior to the formation of MLR Enterprises, he was chairman of the HayGroup, a worldwide management consulting company specializing in compensation and human resource management. Fiero's professional background is in finance, having spent 25 years with the Chase Manhattan Bank, most recently as executive vice president. Daniel R. Ilgen is the John A. Hannah professor of organizational behavior in the departments of psychology and of management at Michigan State University. His research has addressed issues of leadership, motivation, and the process of appraising performance. With respect to the latter, his primary concerns are with factors that affect the acquisition, memory, and retrieval of information about the performance of others. He has served as the president of the Society of Industrial and Organizational Psychology, a division of the American Psychological Association. He has served, or is serving, on a number of editorial boards, including the Academy of Management Review, the Journal of Applied Psychology, Motivation and Emotion, and Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes. He received a B.S. degree from Iowa State University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in psychology from the University of Illinois. Patricia W. Ingraham is associate professor and director of the Master's Program in Public Policy and Administration at the State University of New York at Binghamton. She is coeditor of Legislating Bureaucratic Change: The Civil Service Reform Act of 1978 and The American Public Service: An Agenda for Excellence, and has published extensively on the American federal bureaucracy. She has an M.A. from Michigan State University and a Ph.D. from the State University of New York at Binghamton. Anne S. Mavor is associate study director of the Committee on Performance Appraisal for Merit Pay. Trained as an experimental psychologist, her current interests include performance measurement, information processing, and decision making. Prior to joining the National Research Council she spent several years as a consultant in the behavioral and social sciences working in the areas of information system design, training, and program evaluation. William A. Morrill is a research executive at Mathtech, Inc., with more than 20 years of prior service in the federal government in both senior career and appointive positions. He has focused on the public policy issues underlying this report from leadership positions in the Council for Excellence in Government and the National Academy of Public Administration. He has and continues to serve the National Research Council in a variety of roles, currently as a member of the Committee on National Statistics and a recent appointee to the Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education.

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Pay for Performance: Evaluating Performance Appraisal and Merit Pay Kevin R. Murphy is professor of psychology at the Colorado State University. He is a fellow of the American Psychological Association and of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology and is a member of the editorial boards of the Journal of Applied Psychology, Personnel Psychology, and Human Performance. He has published extensively in the areas of performance appraisal, human judgment and decision making, and psychological measurement and is coauthor (with Jeanette N. Cleveland) of Performance Appraisal: An Organizational Perspective and (with Charles O. Davidshofer) Psychological Testing: Principles and Applications and coeditor (with Frank E. Saal) of Psychology in Organizations: Integrating Science and Practice. He has a B.A. in psychology from Siena College, an M.S. from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and a Ph.D. from Pennsylvania State University, both in industrial/organizational psychology. James Perry is professor of public and environmental affairs in the School of Public and Environmental Affairs at Indiana University, Bloomington. He has a B.A. from the University of Chicago, and M.P.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the Maxwell School at Syracuse University, in public administration. He is past president of the Section on Personnel Administration and Labor Relations of the American Society for Public Administration and past chair of the Public Sector Division, Academy of Management. His research focuses on public management and public personnel issues. He has written numerous articles and books, including Technological Innovation in American Local Government (with K.L. Kraemer), Labor-Management Relations and Public Agency Effectiveness (with H.A. Angle), and Public Management: Public and Private Perspectives (with K.L. Kraemer). Walter H. Read is the director of corporate compensation and benefits for the IBM Corporation. In his current position, he has worldwide responsibility for establishing the strategic direction and policy for compensation, benefits, international assignments, human resource information systems, and performance management systems. He is an alumnus of the Stanford Business School and is a past chairman of The Conference Board on Compensation. Alexandra K. Wigdor, study director of the Committee on Performance Appraisal for Merit Pay, is director of the Division on Education, Training, and Employment in the social sciences commission of the National Research Council. Her previous work as an NRC staff officer has included a study of the General Aptitude Test Battery (1989), a series of studies of job performance in the military, and the 1982 study, coedited with Wendell R. Garner, Ability Testing: Uses, Consequence, and Controversies. Trained as a historian, her research interests now include human performance assessment, the legal and social dimensions of psychological testing, and the development of government policy on testing and selection.