Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers

ROBERT BIANCHI is associate professor of political science at the University of Chicago. His areas of specialization include international relations, comparative politics (especially the Middle East) and Islam and political change. Recent publications include Unruly Corporatism: Associational Life in Twentieth Century Egypt (Oxford University Press, 1989), Interest Groups and Political Development in Turkey (Princeton University Press, 1984) and numerous journal articles on interest groups and associations in developing countries.

MICHAEL BRATTON is associate professor in the Department of Political Science and African Studies Center, Michigan State University. He has written extensively on a variety of issues relevant to Africa, particularly the importance of nongovernmental and voluntary organizations for development. He has also done research for A.I.D. and for the Rockefeller and Ford Foundations. He is the author of recent articles in Issue, Development and Change, World Politics, and World Development, among other journals, and co-editor of Governance and Politics in Africa (Lynne Rienner Press, forthcoming 1991).

MICHAEL CLOUGH is senior fellow for Africa at the Council on Foreign Relations. He is also a member of the board of directors of Africa Watch. In 1986-87 he was the study director of the Secretary of State's Advisory Committee on South Africa and the principal drafter of the Committee 's report, A U.S. Policy Towards South Africa. He has taught at the Naval Postgraduate School and the University of Wisconsin. In addition, he has worked as a consultant to CBS News. Dr. Clough's most recent published work includes Africa and the U.S. Foreign Policy Agenda (forthcoming), “Southern Africa: Challenges and Choices” (Summer, 1988 Foreign Affairs), “Beyond Constructive Engagement” (Winter, 1985-86 Foreign Policy). He has visited southern Africa regularly for over a decade.

LOUIS GOODMAN is dean of the School of International Service of the American University. From 1982 to 1986 he served on the senior staff of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. Before joining



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THE TRANSITION TO DEMOCRACY: Proceedings of a Workshop Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers ROBERT BIANCHI is associate professor of political science at the University of Chicago. His areas of specialization include international relations, comparative politics (especially the Middle East) and Islam and political change. Recent publications include Unruly Corporatism: Associational Life in Twentieth Century Egypt (Oxford University Press, 1989), Interest Groups and Political Development in Turkey (Princeton University Press, 1984) and numerous journal articles on interest groups and associations in developing countries. MICHAEL BRATTON is associate professor in the Department of Political Science and African Studies Center, Michigan State University. He has written extensively on a variety of issues relevant to Africa, particularly the importance of nongovernmental and voluntary organizations for development. He has also done research for A.I.D. and for the Rockefeller and Ford Foundations. He is the author of recent articles in Issue, Development and Change, World Politics, and World Development, among other journals, and co-editor of Governance and Politics in Africa (Lynne Rienner Press, forthcoming 1991). MICHAEL CLOUGH is senior fellow for Africa at the Council on Foreign Relations. He is also a member of the board of directors of Africa Watch. In 1986-87 he was the study director of the Secretary of State's Advisory Committee on South Africa and the principal drafter of the Committee 's report, A U.S. Policy Towards South Africa. He has taught at the Naval Postgraduate School and the University of Wisconsin. In addition, he has worked as a consultant to CBS News. Dr. Clough's most recent published work includes Africa and the U.S. Foreign Policy Agenda (forthcoming), “Southern Africa: Challenges and Choices” (Summer, 1988 Foreign Affairs), “Beyond Constructive Engagement” (Winter, 1985-86 Foreign Policy). He has visited southern Africa regularly for over a decade. LOUIS GOODMAN is dean of the School of International Service of the American University. From 1982 to 1986 he served on the senior staff of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. Before joining

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THE TRANSITION TO DEMOCRACY: Proceedings of a Workshop the Wilson Center, he was on the faculty of Yale University and was director of the Social Science Research Council's Program on Latin America and the Caribbean. Dr. Goodman has also taught at Georgetown, Princeton, and Northwestern universities, as well as at the Facultad Latinoamericana de las Ciencias Sociales in Santiago, Chile. His publications include nine books and numerous scholarly articles. His major continuing research interest, reflected in his publications, is international influences on national development in the Third World. SELIG HARRISON is a senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Washington and has written on Asian affairs and American policy problems in Asia for almost 40 years. Mr. Harrison has written and edited a large number of books on Asia, as well as numerous articles on a range of Asian issues. Recent works include In Afghanistan's Shadow (Carnegie, 1981), “Ethnicity and the Political Stalemate in Pakistan” in The State, Religion, and Ethnic Politics: Afghanistan, Iran and Pakistan (Syracuse University Press, 1986) and numerous articles published in the domestic and foreign press. He is co-editor of Superpower Rivalry in the Indian Ocean (Oxford University Press, 1989). TERRY L. KARL is associate professor of political science at Stanford University, where she is director of the Center for Latin American Studies. Her research interests include comparative politics, the political economy of development, and theories of democratization in developing countries. Her work has largely focused on Latin America and the Caribbean Basin. She is the author of Oil Booms and Petro-States (University of California Press, forthcoming, 1991). Recent articles and chapters include “Dilemmas of Democratization” (in Comparative Politics, forthcoming, 1991), “El Salvador at the Crossroads” (World Policy Journal, 1989), and “The Christian Democratic Party and the Prospects for Democratization in E1 Salvador” in The Sociology of Developing Countries: Central America (Monthly Review Press, 1989). CAROL LANCASTER is assistant professor at Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service and a visiting fellow at the Institute for International Economics in Washington. She is co-editor of African Debt and Financing (Institute for International Economics, 1986) and the author of numerous articles. Some of the most recent are: “Reform or Else” (June/July 1990 Africa Report), “Economic Reform in Africa” (Winter, 1990 Washington Quarterly), and “Economic Restructuring in Sub-Saharan Africa” (May, 1989 Current History). She was co-author of “Funding Foreign Aid” (Summer, 1988 Foreign Policy). JANE MANSBRIDGE is professor of political science at Northwestern University and a member of its Center for Urban Affairs and Policy Research. Professor Mansbridge was program chair of the 1990 annual meeting of the American Political Science Association. She has published

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THE TRANSITION TO DEMOCRACY: Proceedings of a Workshop three books, Beyond Self-Interest (University of Chicago Press, 1990), Why We Lost the ERA (University of Chicago Press, 1986) and Beyond Adversary Democracy (University of Chicago Press, 1980), as well as numerous scholarly articles dealing with theoretical aspects of inequality and conflict in democracies. MICHAEL MEZEY is professor of political science and associate dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at De Paul University. He is the author of Comparative Legislatures (Duke University Press, 1979), Congress, the President, and Public Policy (Westview Press, 1989), and co-editor of Parliaments and Public Policy (Cambridge University Press, forthcoming). He is also the author of book chapters, scholarly articles, and papers in the areas of comparative legislative behavior and American political institutions, including “The Functions of Legislatures in the Third World” in The Handbook of Legislative Research (Harvard University Press, 1985). JOHN NORTON MOORE is Walter L. Brown Professor of Law, Director of the Center of Law and National Security, and director of the Center for Oceans Law and Policy at the University of Virginia. Professor Moore's major research interests include international law, national security law, and the Constitution and foreign policy. He has served on numerous government boards and agencies as a consultant and counselor. Dr. Moore is chairman of the Board of Directors of the United States Institute of Peace, and recently observed the constitutional drafting process in Namibia on behalf of that organization. His most recent books include The Vietnam Debate: A Fresh Look at the Arguments (University Press of America, Inc., 1990), National Security Law (co-editor, Carolina Academic Press, 1990), and The Secret War in Central America (University Publications of America, Inc., 1986). DANIEL NELSON is a senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, where he writes on Eastern Europe and European security. Dr. Nelson's recent books include Romanian Politics in the Ceauscscu Era (1989), Elite-Mass Relations in Communist Systems (St. Martin, 1987), and Alliance Behavior in the Warsaw Pact (Westview, 1986). He edited Soviet Alliance: Empirical Studies of the Warsaw Pact (Westview, 1988). Dr. Nelson is the author of several recent pieces on political attitudes in Eastern Europe for the New York Times, The National Interest, El Pais, and other national publications. Dr. Nelson has been a Dorothy Danforth Compton Fellow, a Kellogg Foundation National Fellow, and the recipient of a research fellowship from the Hoover Institution. JOAN NELSON is a senior associate at the Overseas Development Council in Washington. Her research interests include development assistance and policy dialogue, migration, foreign aid, and the politics of economic stabilization and reform. Her major publications include Access

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THE TRANSITION TO DEMOCRACY: Proceedings of a Workshop to Power: Politics and the Urban Poor in Developing Nations (Center for International Affairs, Harvard University, 1979), No Easy Choice: Political Participation in Developing Countries (with Samuel P. Huntington), (Harvard University Press, 1984), and Economic Crisis and Policy Choice: The Politics of Adjustment in the Third World (ed.) (Princeton University Press, 1990). ERIC NORDLINGER is professor of political science at Brown University and an associate of Brown University's Center for Foreign Policy Development and of Harvard's Center for International Affairs. Professor Nordlinger has been the recipient of grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Ford Foundation, and the National Science Foundation. Two recent books are On the Autonomy of the Democratic State (Harvard University Press, 1981), and Soldiers in Politics: Military Coups and Government (1977). PEARL ROBINSON is associate professor of political science at Tufts University. She has written extensively about African politics. Her most recent work includes articles on transnational NGOs, the neotraditional corporatist state in Niger, and the challenges posed by co-development for African and Afro-American women. She contributed a chapter, “Grassroots Participation and the Legitimation Process: The Quest for Effective Military Governance in Burkina and Niger” to Governance and Politics in Africa (Lynne Rienner, forthcoming). Professor Robinson co-edited Transformation and Resiliency in Africa (Howard University Press, 1986). She is currently working on a book, Neotraditional Corporatism in Niger. PHILIPPE SCHMITTER is professor of political science at Stanford University. He has written extensively on transitions from authoritarianism to more democratic forms of rule, particularly in Southern Europe and Latin America. His recent work has dealt with topics such as corporatism and the organization of business interests, as well as a variety of other issues related to transitions to democracy. He co-edited and contributed to the four volume series, Transitions from Authoritarian Rule: Prospects for Democracy (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1986). CHARLES TILLY (Workshop Cochair) is University Distinguished Professor and director of the Center for Studies of Social Change at the New School for Social Research. Professor Tilly is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the author of many scholarly books, articles, and papers. His recent books include From Mobilization to Revolution (Random House, 1978), Big Structures, Large Processes, Huge Comparisons (Russell Sage, 1985), and Coercion, Capital, and European States, A.D. 990-1990 (Blackwell, 1990). SIDNEY VERBA (Workshop Cochair) is Carl H. Pforzheimer University Professor and Professor of Government at Harvard. Professor Verba is the author of numerous books, chapters, and articles on American and com-

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THE TRANSITION TO DEMOCRACY: Proceedings of a Workshop parative politics. His recent books include Elites and the Idea of Equality: A Comparison of Japan, Sweden, and the United States (Harvard University Press, 1987) and Equality in America: The View from the Top (Harvard University Press, 1985). Professor Verba has been chair of the Policy Committee of the Social Science Research Council and is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, a Guggenheim Fellow, and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Verba is also director of the Harvard University Library. SIDNEY WEINTRAUB is jointly Dean Rusk Professor at the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs, University of Texas and distinguished visiting scholar at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, Washington, D.C. Prior to joining the faculty of the LBJ School, he was a foreign service officer in the U.S. Department of State. Among his positions in the State Department were deputy assistant secretary for International Finance and Development and assistant administrator of the Agency for International Development. Professor Weintraub is the author of many books and articles on international political economy. His most recent book is A Marriage of Convenience: Relations between Mexico and the United States (Oxford University Press, 1990). GARY WYNIA is William J. Kenan Professor of Latin American Politics at Carleton College. He is the author of numerous books, articles, and other publications dealing with Latin America, particularly Argentina. His most recent books are The Politics of Latin American Development (third edition, Cambridge University Press, 1990), and Argentina: Illusions and Realities (Holmes and Meier, 1986). Dr. Wynia's recent articles and book chapters have dealt with issues such as Latin American debt, Central American integration, and the causes of rebellion in Central America.

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