CREATION

Bringing into being a new ecosystem that previously did not exist on the site.

D

DIATOMS

Microscopic plants are abundant in plankton. They sometimes produce a water "bloom" and give a yellowish or brownish tint to the water. Diatoms are notable for their shells of silica and the siliceous character imparted to bottom deposits by their remains.

E

ECOLOGICAL INTEGRITY

Maintenance of the structure and functional attributes characteristic of a particular locale, including normal variability.

ECOREGIONS

Ecological regions that have broad similarities with respect to soil, relief, and dominant vegetation.

ECOSYSTEM

A biological community together with the physical and chemical environment with which it interacts.

ECOSYSTEM CREATION

Construction of an ecosystem with new species, soil, and vegetation on a site that had a different type of system before destruction or damage occurred. (See creation.)

ECOSYSTEM FUNCTION1

Any performance attribute or rate function at some level of biological organization (e.g., energy flow, detritus processing, nutrient spiraling).

EMERGENT PLANTS

Aquatic plants that are rooted in the sediment, but whose leaves are at or above the water surface. These wetland plants provide habitat for wildlife and waterfowl in addition to removing urban pollutants.

ENHANCEMENT

In the context of restoration ecology, any improvement of a structural or functional attribute. Odum et al. (1979) have defined whatever contributes to enhancement as a subsidy.

EPILIMNION

In a thermally stratified lake, the turbulent layer of water that extends from the surface to the metalimnion.

EUTROPHICATION

Enrichment of lakes with nutrients. Increase in nutrients required for the growth of organisms may come about by natural processes, or rapid enrichment may take place due to some cause such as introduction of sewage effluent.

EUTROPHIC LAKES

"Rich" lakes; those well provided with the basic nutrients required for plant and animal production. In some lakes this enrichment becomes harmful, and light penetration and oxygen production are insufficient to maintain productivity. Oxygen is then consumed at a rate equal to that at which it is produced.

F

FLOODPLAIN

Defined by hydrologists as the area flooded at a recurrence interval of once in 100 years (Bhowmik and Stall, 1979). Ecologists define floodplains as areas that are periodically inundated (usually annually) by the lateral overflow of rivers or lakes, or by direct precipitation or ground water; the resulting physico-chemical



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