Appendix C— Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Professional Staff

JOHN CAIRNS, JR., received his Ph.D. in zoology from the University of Pennsylvania in 1953. His expertise lies in the ecology of freshwater protozoa and the response of aquatic organisms to toxic substances; water management; rapid biological information systems; the ecology of polluted water; regional environmental analysis; hazard evaluation, including evaluation of toxic chemicals; and restoration of damaged ecosystems. Since 1968, he has held the positions of University Distinguished Professor of Environmental Biology and director, University Center for Environmental and Hazardous Materials Studies, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. He was a founding member of the Water Science and Technology Board and was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1991.

G. RONNIE BEST obtained his M.S. (1971) and Ph.D. (1976) at the University of Georgia, Athens, in ecology and botany. Since 1979, Dr. Best has held the positions of associate director, Center for Wetlands, and associate research scientist at the University of Florida. His areas of expertise include plant community ecology, ecosystems, mineral cycling, wetlands and wetlands management, mycorrhizae, and reconstruction of disturbed ecosystems.

PATRICK L. BREZONIK obtained his Ph.D. (water chemistry) in 1968 from the University of Wisconsin. His professional experience includes positions as assistant professor of water chemistry and environmental



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Restoration of Aquatic Ecosystems: Science, Technology, and Public Policy Appendix C— Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Professional Staff JOHN CAIRNS, JR., received his Ph.D. in zoology from the University of Pennsylvania in 1953. His expertise lies in the ecology of freshwater protozoa and the response of aquatic organisms to toxic substances; water management; rapid biological information systems; the ecology of polluted water; regional environmental analysis; hazard evaluation, including evaluation of toxic chemicals; and restoration of damaged ecosystems. Since 1968, he has held the positions of University Distinguished Professor of Environmental Biology and director, University Center for Environmental and Hazardous Materials Studies, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. He was a founding member of the Water Science and Technology Board and was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1991. G. RONNIE BEST obtained his M.S. (1971) and Ph.D. (1976) at the University of Georgia, Athens, in ecology and botany. Since 1979, Dr. Best has held the positions of associate director, Center for Wetlands, and associate research scientist at the University of Florida. His areas of expertise include plant community ecology, ecosystems, mineral cycling, wetlands and wetlands management, mycorrhizae, and reconstruction of disturbed ecosystems. PATRICK L. BREZONIK obtained his Ph.D. (water chemistry) in 1968 from the University of Wisconsin. His professional experience includes positions as assistant professor of water chemistry and environmental

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Restoration of Aquatic Ecosystems: Science, Technology, and Public Policy engineering, University of Florida (1966–1970); associate professor of water chemistry (1970–1976), professor of environmental science (1976–1981), and professor of environmental engineering, University of Minnesota since 1981; and director, Water Resources Research Center since 1985. His research interests are the eutrophication of lakes, nitrogen dynamics in natural water, acid rain, and organic matter in water. STEPHEN R. CARPENTER received his Ph.D. in botany (1979) from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He served from 1979 to 1989 on the faculty at the University of Notre Dame, where he taught courses in biostatistics and aquatic ecology and developed limnological research programs at the Environmental Research Center near Land O' Lakes, Wisconsin. Dr. Carpenter has been Bassett Research Professor at the Center for Limnology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, since 1989. His research interests include ecosystem experiments, ecological modeling, plankton, and macrophytes. He has served on several committees and editorial boards for the Ecological Society of America and the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography. G. DENNIS COOKE received his B.S. in biology (1959) from Kent State University, and his M.S. (1963) and Ph.D. (1965) in zoology from the University of Iowa. He has been involved in basic and applied research in zoology since the late 1960s, has served as a consultant to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Clean Lakes Program, was one of the originators and the first president (1980-1981) of the North American Lake Management Society, and is associate editor of both the Water Resources Bulletin and Lake and Reservoir Management . Dr. Cooke has been a professor of biological sciences at Kent State University since 1976. DONALD L. HEY received a B.S. in civil engineering (1963) from the University of Missouri at Rolla, an M.S. in water resources engineering (1968) from Kansas University, and a Ph.D. in environmental engineering (1974) from Northwestern University. He is currently director of Wetlands Research, Inc., in Chicago, Illinois, and president of Hey and Associates, Inc., in Chicago. A few of his past positions include adjunct professor, Northeastern Illinois University, Chicago; vice president, Hydrocomp, Inc., Palo Alto, California and Chicago, Illinois; and research analyst and engineer, Public Works Department, City of Chicago. His research interests include producing criteria necessary for restoring river systems through the use of

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Restoration of Aquatic Ecosystems: Science, Technology, and Public Policy wetlands and developing management programs for the continued operation of the new structure. Dr. Hey is a member of the American Geophysical Union, the Society of Sigma Xi, Lambda Alpha International, and the American Society of Civil Engineers. JON A. KUSLER obtained a B.S. in English and geology from the University of Wisconsin (with work at the University of Minnesota and the University of San Francisco); an M.S. in water resources management; his Ph.D. in land and water use management (an interdisciplinary degree involving law, geology, and economics); and a J.D. in law. Dr. Kusler is a lawyer, writer, and educator with 26 years of experience working with legal, science, and policy issues. He has served on the staffs of the Universities of Wisconsin and Massachusetts, and is currently the executive director of the Association of State Wetland Managers and legal counsel to the Association of State Floodplain Managers. He has served as a policy advisor to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Wetlands Protection, the former U.S. Water Resources Council, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. He has also acted as an advisor to the National Wetland Policy Forum and many state governments. CLAIRE L. SCHELSKE, who has a Ph.D. in zoology, is currently at the University of Florida. His professional experience has included work at the University of Georgia Marine Institute and as a fishery biologist, Radiobiological Laboratory, Bureau of Commercial Fisheries. At the University of Michigan he was a research scientist in the Great Lakes Division from 1967 to 1987 and acting director from 1973 to 1976. He also served as an associate professor of limnology at the University of Michigan. Dr. Schelske's research interests include eutrophication, biogeochemistry, and paleolimnology of the Great Lakes and freshwater ecosystem ecology. LEONARD SHABMAN received a Ph.D. in agricultural economics in 1972 from Cornell University. He has been with Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University since 1972, first as an assistant professor and currently as a professor in the Department of Agricultural Economics. His responsibilities include the conduct and management of a research program in resource and environmental policy analysis; classroom teaching; and undergraduate and graduate student advising. Dr. Shabman has conducted economic research since 1972 over a wide range of topics in natural resource and environmental policy. He was an economic advisor to the Water Resources

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Restoration of Aquatic Ecosystems: Science, Technology, and Public Policy Council in 1977–1978 and scientific advisor to the Assistant Secretary of the Army, Civil Works in 1984–1985. REBECCA R. SHARITZ acquired her Ph.D. in botany in 1970 from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She is currently a professor of botany at the University of Georgia and a senior ecologist at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, where she is also head of the Division of Wetlands Ecology. Her research interests are plant population biology, structure and diversity of plant communities, and wetlands ecology. SOROOSH SOROOSHIAN received his B.S. in mechanical engineering from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, in 1971; an M.S. in systems engineering from the University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA) in 1973; and a Ph.D. from UCLA in 1978 in systems engineering, with specializations in water resources and hydrologic systems analysis. He is currently a professor and head of the Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, and a professor in the Department of Systems and Industrial Engineering at the University of Arizona, Tucson. He is also serving a four-year term (1988–1991) as editor of Water Resources Research, published by the American Geophysical Union. His research interests are surface hydrology, including rainfall-runoff modeling; flood forecasting; application of remote sensing in hydrology; and climate studies. RICHARD E. SPARKS acquired his Ph.D. (biology) in 1971 from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. He is currently an aquatic biologist, Illinois Natural History Survey, and director of the River Research Laboratory of the Forbes Biological Station on the Illinois River at Havana, Illinois, where he has worked since 1972. Dr. Sparks's interests include biological monitoring for pollution control, by using organisms as sensors; restoration of degraded aquatic ecosystems; ecology of large floodplain rivers; bioassays using aquatic organisms; and river surveys. He is a member of the American Fisheries Society, the Ecological Society of America, and Sigma Xi. JAMES T. B. TRIPP obtained his L.L.B. from Yale Law School in 1966 along with an M.S. in philosophy from Yale's graduate school. He was Assistant U.S. Attorney for Southern New York State from 1968 to 1973. Since 1973, he has been with the Environmental Defense Fund as head of its Eastern Water Resources and Land Use Program. His interests include wetlands protection and ground water quality protection. He was formerly a member of the National

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Restoration of Aquatic Ecosystems: Science, Technology, and Public Policy Research Council Committee on Ground Water Quality Protection: State and Local Strategies. DANIEL E. WILLARD is an ecologist and wetlands biologist. He received an A.B. in biology (1959) from Stanford University and a Ph.D. in zoology (1966) from the University of California, Davis. He taught zoology at the University of Texas from 1966 to 1970, and at the University of Wisconsin through 1977. He has taught at the University of Oregon's Institute of Marine Biology and Cornell University's Shoals Marine Laboratory. He has served on the Office of Technology Assessment's Wetland Committee, on committees of the National Research Council's Water Science and Technology Board, on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's wetland committees, on the National Wetland Policy Forum, and on Indiana's Water and Minerals Advisory Board. He is a professor and the director of environmental science and policy programs in the School of Public and Environmental Affairs, as well as a professor of biology, at Indiana University, Bloomington. JOY B. ZEDLER holds a Ph.D. in botany (plant ecology) from the University of Wisconsin. Since 1969, she has been at San Diego State University (SDSU) and is currently a professor of biology at SDSU and director of the Pacific Estuarine Research Laboratory. Her research interests include salt marsh ecology; structure and functioning of coastal wetlands; restoration and construction of wetland ecosystems; effects of rare, extreme events on estuarine ecosystems; dynamics of nutrients and algae in coastal wetlands; and use of scientific information in the management of coastal habitats. She recently worked on a compilation of literature on the creation and restoration of wetlands for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Dr. Zedler was appointed as a member of the Water Science and Technology Board in July 1991. CONSULTANT JOHN J. BERGER received a B.A. in political science from Stanford University in 1966; an M.A. in energy and resources from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1980; and a Ph.D. in ecology from the University of California, Davis, in 1990. Dr. Berger is currently a visiting associate professor in the environmental policy branch of the University of Maryland's School of Public Affairs. He is also the founder and director of a private, nonprofit organization, Restoring the Earth, that fosters the repair of ecological damage through re

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Restoration of Aquatic Ecosystems: Science, Technology, and Public Policy search, consulting, public policy development, model restoration work, and public education. He has authored and edited books on energy and environmental restoration, and is working to produce a public television documentary on restoration ecology. PROFESSIONAL STAFF SHEILA D. DAVID, a senior program officer at the Water Science and Technology Board, served as study director for the Committee on Restoration of Aquatic Ecosystems. On the staff of the National Research Council (NRC) since 1976, she has served as staff director for various NRC study projects, including studies on coastal erosion, ground water protection, water quality and water reuse, and natural resource protection in the Grand Canyon. JEANNE AQUILINO is the administrative specialist for the Water Science and Technology Board and for the Committee on Restoration of Aquatic Ecosystems. She has been on the staff of the National Research Council since 1979.

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