TABLE 3-3 DOD Malaria Program Funding

 

Funding ($000)

Category

FY 86

FY 87

FY 88

FY 89

FY 90

Vaccines

Technical base

Army-in-house

1,352

1,252

1,210

914

785

Army-field sites

822

950

738

703

817

Navy-in-house

1,138

706

1,147

996

809

Navy-field sites

220

142

193

245

286

Extramural

452

457

435

402

425

Advanced development

In-house

587

1,321

1,164

270

330

Extramural

458

834

923

0

0

Total vaccine funding

5,029

5,662

5,810

3,530

3,452

Drugs

2,400

2,200

2,000

1,900

1,700

Vectors

Research

In-house

210

220

230

240

250

Overseas

320

340

360

380

400

Control

281

189

231

253

212

Total vector funding

811

749

821

873

862

Total malaria program

8,240

8,611

8,631

6,303

6,014

Percent vaccines

61.0

65.8

67.3

56.0

57.4

Percent drugs

29.1

25.5

23.2

30.1

28.3

Percent vectors

9.8

8.7

9.5

13.9

14.3

SOURCES: USAMRDC and U.S. Army Biomedical Research and DevelopmentLaboratory, Fort Detrick; Division of Experimental Therapeutics andDepartment of Entomology, WRAIR.

extramural researchers in the basic and clinical sciences and is the only federal entity that actively supports basic research on tropical diseases.

Consistent with overall NIAID and NIH funding patterns, about 20 percent of all tropical disease research monies are spent in-house, with most of the remainder going to U.S. investigators outside NIH through a competitive grants award system. Grants from NIAID to foreign investigators for tropical disease research are relatively rare. Out of a total FY 1989 budget of $831 million, NIAID allocated $8.3 million (1 percent) to malaria (Table 3-4). While funding for tropical diseases as a proportion of the overall NIAID budget has declined over the past four years (largely because of the rapid influx of AIDS research funding), funding for malaria as a proportion of tropical diseases has increased. The bulk of NIAID extramural malaria research support during FY 1987 through FY 1989 went to studies on vaccines and immunity, while research on parasite biology received the next largest share of funds (Figure 3-4).

Overall, the U.S. government has invested nearly $140 million on malaria research and control activities over the past four years (Table 3-5). More than half of that amount was spent by USAID.



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