logical Evidence,” Kathleen E. Malone, Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Washington, Seattle, Wash. (Appendix A)

“Summary Table of Studies of Breast Cancer Risk Related to Oral Contraceptive Use (December 11, 1989),” Kathleen E. Malone, Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Washington, Seattle, Wash. (#PB91-186973)

“Oral Contraceptives and Breast Cancer: Review of the Epidemiological Literature,” David B. Thomas, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, University of Washington, Seattle, Wash. (Appendix B)

“Age-Specific Differences in the Relationship Between Oral Contraceptive Use and Breast Cancer,” Phyllis A. Wingo, Nancy C. Lee, Howard W. Ory, Valerie Beral, Herbert B. Peterson, and P. Rhoades, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, Ga. (#PB91-186551)

“Animal Models of Sex Steroid Hormones and Mammary Cancer: Are There Lessons for Our Understanding of Studies in Humans?” Diana B. Petitti, Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of California School of Medicine, San Francisco, Calif. (Appendix D)

“Risks and Benefits of Oral Contraceptives: Will Breast Cancer Tip the Balance?” David C. G. Skegg, Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. (Appendix E)

“Oral Contraceptives and Breast Cancer: Issues Related to Age, Duration of Use, Dose, and Latent Effects,” James J. Schlesselman, Department of Preventive Medicine and Biometrics, School of Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Md. (#PB91-186569)

“Modeling Risks and Benefits of Oral Contraceptives,” Judith Fortney and Michele Bonhomme, Division of Reproductive Epidemiology and Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Family Health International, Research Triangle Park, N.C. (#PB91-186817)



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