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Contributors

Kristi Anseth is a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator and distinguished professor of chemical and biological engineering at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Her research interests lie at the interface between biology and engineering where she designs new biomaterials for applications in drug delivery and regenerative medicine. Dr. Anseth is an elected member of the National Academy of Engineering and the Institute of Medicine.

Phaedra Boinodiris is a serious games program manager at IBM where her work focuses on serious games that push beyond static skills training via inclusion of real data and real processes.

Karen Burg is the Hunter Endowed Chair of Bioengineering and director of the Institute for Biological Interfaces of Engineering at Clemson University. She investigates development of 3D tissue-engineered devices for repairing damaged organs as well as for constructing in vitro tissue test systems (e.g., to test pharmaceuticals or to provide personalized medical treatments). These unique devices comprise cells and a carefully designed, 3D degradable biomaterial. As they develop, in vivo or in vitro, the cells form a 3D tissue as the material degrades.

Li-Te Cheng is a software engineer at Google. His focus is on building new software systems to help people work together. Past systems span games, social media, collaborative software development tools, visualization, virtual reality, augmented reality, and wearable computing.



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Contributors Kristi Anseth is a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator and distin- guished professor of chemical and biological engineering at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Her research interests lie at the interface between biology and engineering where she designs new biomaterials for applications in drug delivery and regenerative medicine. Dr. Anseth is an elected member of the National Academy of Engineering and the Institute of Medicine. Phaedra Boinodiris is a serious games program manager at IBM where her work focuses on serious games that push beyond static skills training via inclusion of real data and real processes. Karen Burg is the Hunter Endowed Chair of Bioengineering and director of the Institute for Biological Interfaces of Engineering at Clemson University. She investigates development of 3D tissue-engineered devices for repairing damaged organs as well as for constructing in vitro tissue test systems (e.g., to test phar- maceuticals or to provide personalized medical treatments). These unique devices comprise cells and a carefully designed, 3D degradable biomaterial. As they develop, in vivo or in vitro, the cells form a 3D tissue as the material degrades. Li-Te Cheng is a software engineer at Google. His focus is on building new software systems to help people work together. Past systems span games, social media, collaborative software development tools, visualization, virtual reality, augmented reality, and wearable computing. 151

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152 FRONTIERS OF ENGINEERING Michael Degner is the senior technical leader for electric machine drives in the Powertrain Research and Advanced Engineering Laboratory at Ford Motor Com- pany where his research is on electric machine drives for hybrid electric, plug-in hybrid electric, fuel cell electric, and battery electric vehicles. Specific areas of research include design of electric machines, power electronics, control of electric machine drives, and alternative vehicle propulsion systems. Matthew Gevaert is the CEO and co-founder of KIYATEC (Greenville, South Carolina), a life sciences company enabling better in vitro models of complex human biology through perfused 3D cell-based assay services and products. His work is primarily directed toward creating cell cultures with higher correla- tion to human responses in order to reduce the high failure rate of clinical trials and to help clinicians match cancer patients with the therapies that will be most effective for them. Other research interest areas include cell processing, tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, adult stem cells, technology entrepreneurship, and commercialization. Ali Khademhosseini is an associate professor at Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and Harvard Medi- cal School. He develops micro- and nanoscale technologies to control cellular behavior with particular emphasis on developing microscale biomaterials and engineering systems for stem cell bioengineering and tissue regeneration. Christopher Jones is the New-Vision Professor in the School of Chemical and Bioengineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. His research interests are in the broad areas of materials design and synthesis, catalysis, and adsorption. Specific emphases are on design and understanding of molecular catalysts and catalytic materials for energy applications, fine chemical and pharmaceutical applications, and adsorbents for CO2 capture. Eli Kintisch is a contributing correspondent for Science magazine and a Knight Science Journalism Fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In addi- tion to traditional journalism, he focuses on communicating climate change in artistic and innovative ways. In 2010, he published his first book, Hack the Planet: Science’s Best Hope–or Worst Nightmare–for Averting Climate Catastrophe. Ben Kravitz is a postdoctoral research associate in the Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. He ­ tudies s geoengineering with stratospheric aerosols and details of aerosol scattering using climate models. Helen Lu is an associate professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineer- ing at Columbia University. Her research seeks to understand how the biological

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CONTRIBUTORS 153 interface between different types of connective tissues are formed and maintained in the body and, more importantly, how to regenerate these distinct tissue-to-tissue boundaries post injury and in complex tissue systems. Arindam Maitra is the senior program manager of power, delivery, and utiliza- tion at the Electric Power Research Institute. He conducts and manages a wide range of research activities and power system studies in the transmission, distribu- tion, power electronics, power quality, smart grid, electric transportation, energy efficiency, and IntelliGrid research areas. Rahul Mangharam is the Stephen J. Angello Chair and an assistant professor in the Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering at the University of P ­ ennsylvania. His research involves real-time architectures and scheduling algo- rithms for computing, communication, and coordination of physical computing systems. These include wireless control of industrial automation networks, medi- cal device software and systems, energy-efficient building automation, real-time parallel computation, and networked automotive cyberphysical systems. Richard Marks is a senior member of the US research and development depart- ment of Sony Computer Entertainment, where he focuses on engineering new experiences for video games. His primary focus is interaction technologies such as real-time video processing, sensor fusion, and control theory. Sanjeev Naik is the engineering group manager in the Advanced Engine Controls Department of General Motors. His work focuses on the application of modern and adaptive control and signal processing techniques to improve the efficiency, performance, and safety of conventional and electrified vehicles. Zoran Popovic is a professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering and director of the Center for Game Science at the University of Washington. His research interests lie primarily in computer graphics, especially in character animation, motion editing, physically based modeling, and model- ing and simulation of natural phenomena. He is also interested in nonlinearly constrained optimization, motion planning, and biomechanics. Lynn Russell is a professor of atmospheric science at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. She investigates the chemical and physical components of aerosol particles in the earth’s atmosphere under pristine marine conditions and in anthro- pogenically influenced conditions in order to assess their impacts on climate. Her program in aerosol research focuses on the fundamentals of aerosol formation by nucleation and the characterization and evolution of particles in the atmosphere.

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154 FRONTIERS OF ENGINEERING Jeff Sakamoto is an associate professor in the Department of Chemical Engi- neering and Materials Science at Michigan State University where his research focuses on solution-based synthesis of porous materials. The ability to order interconnected porosity at multiple length scales provides a modular experimental platform enabling investigations into the interplay between micro-meso-macro pore morphology and mass/charge transport for energy storage and biomedicine. Ben Sawyer is the co-founder of Digitalmill, which helps organizations outside the videogame industry such as health, education, defense, workforce develop- ment, and science, utilize tools, techniques, and resources from the field of vid- eogames and videogame technologies. David Schaffer is a professor in the Department of Chemical and Bio­ olecular m Engineering, the Department of Bioengineering, and the Helen Wills Neurosci- ence Institute at the University of California at Berkeley, where he is also the director of the Berkeley Stem Cell Center. His research program applies engineer- ing principles to solve molecular-level problems that currently impede clinical translation. Specifically, he engineers systems to investigate and control stem cell function for application in neural tissue regeneration. In parallel, he engineers viral gene therapy vehicles to improve their performance in numerous therapeutic applications. David Sholl is the Michael Tennenbaum Family Chair and GRA Eminent Scholar in the School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the Georgia Insti- tute of Technology. His research is in computational materials modeling, carbon capture, gas separation membranes, heterogeneous catalysis, and nanostructured surfaces. Armin Sorooshian is an assistant professor in the Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering and the Department of Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Arizona. He uses modeling, laboratory and field measurements, and remote sensing data to understand the effects of atmospheric aerosol particles on public health, climate change, the hydrologic cycle, and ecosystems. He also develops instrumentation for aerosol measurements and is interested in the inter- face of climate science and public policy. Kurt Squire is an associate professor in the Educational Communications Tech- nology Division of Curriculum and Instruction at the University of Wisconsin- Madison and co-founder and director of the Games, Learning, and Society Initia- tive. He investigates the potential of videogame-based technologies for systemic change in education, and his work integrates research and theory on digital media (particularly games) with theories of situated cognition in order to understand how to design educational environments in a digital age.

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CONTRIBUTORS 155 Alan Taub is a professor of materials science and engineering at the University of Michigan where his research is on advanced materials and processing. He is leading an effort to establish a new center within the College of Engineering that will focus on advanced manufacturing of lightweight material structures for automotive and aerospace applications. Previously, Dr. Taub held positions at GE, Ford Motor Company, and most recently as vice president of Global Research and Development at General Motors. Matthew Willard is an associate professor in the Department on Materials Sci- ence and Engineering at Case Western Reserve University. He has been active in the magnetic materials community, performing research in topic areas including nanocrystalline soft magnets, rare earth permanent magnets, ferromagnetic shape memory alloys, and magnetocaloric materials. His research focuses on the inter- section of nanoscience and energy technologies, especially where size, weight, and efficiency of magnetic components are paramount.

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