Appendix

Biographic Information on the Committee on Potential Health Risks from Recurrent Lead Exposure of DoD Firing Range Personnel

David C. Dorman (Chair) is professor of toxicology in the Department of Molecular Biosciences of North Carolina State University. His research is directed toward understanding human health risks associated with environmentally relevant chemicals. It is focused primarily on the respiratory toxicology, neurotoxicology, and pharmacokinetics of environmental agents. He has served on several National Research Council committees, including serving as chair of the Committee on Emergency and Continuous Exposure Guidance Levels for Selected Submarine Contaminants and as a member of the Committee to Review the Draft IRIS Assessment on Formaldehyde. Dr. Dorman received his DVM from Colorado State University and his PhD in veterinary biosciences and toxicology from the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign. He is a diplomate of the American Board of Veterinary Toxicology and of the American Board of Toxicology and a fellow of the Academy of Toxicological Sciences.

Susan H. Benoff was formerly director of the Fertility Research Laboratories of the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research. She was also an associate professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of New York University School of Medicine and director of the Molecular Biology Laboratories, Division of Human Reproduction, in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of North Shore University Hospital. Her research interests were in male infertility and testicular cancer with emphasis on the role that environmental exposure to heavy metals and compounds with hormone-like activity may play in the causes of these disorders. She has been an active member of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, most recently serving as chair of the Environment and Reproduction Special Interest Group. She is also on the Board of Directors



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Appendix Biographic Information on the Committee on Potential Health Risks from Recurrent Lead Exposure of DoD Firing Range Personnel David C. Dorman (Chair) is professor of toxicology in the Department of Mo- lecular Biosciences of North Carolina State University. His research is directed toward understanding human health risks associated with environmentally rele- vant chemicals. It is focused primarily on the respiratory toxicology, neurotoxi- cology, and pharmacokinetics of environmental agents. He has served on several National Research Council committees, including serving as chair of the Com- mittee on Emergency and Continuous Exposure Guidance Levels for Selected Submarine Contaminants and as a member of the Committee to Review the Draft IRIS Assessment on Formaldehyde. Dr. Dorman received his DVM from Colorado State University and his PhD in veterinary biosciences and toxicology from the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign. He is a diplomate of the American Board of Veterinary Toxicology and of the American Board of Toxi- cology and a fellow of the Academy of Toxicological Sciences. Susan H. Benoff was formerly director of the Fertility Research Laboratories of the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research. She was also an associate professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of New York University School of Medicine and director of the Molecular Biology Laboratories, Divi- sion of Human Reproduction, in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of North Shore University Hospital. Her research interests were in male infertil- ity and testicular cancer with emphasis on the role that environmental exposure to heavy metals and compounds with hormone-like activity may play in the causes of these disorders. She has been an active member of the American Soci- ety for Reproductive Medicine, most recently serving as chair of the Environ- ment and Reproduction Special Interest Group. She is also on the Board of Di- 174

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Appendix 175 rectors of the Society for Male Reproduction and Urology and a member of the Council of the American Society of Andrology. Dr. Benoff received her PhD in cell biology from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva Univer- sity. Edward C. Bishop was formerly vice president of Parsons Government Ser- vices. He has diverse experience in industrial hygiene, environmental compli- ance, emergency response, and risk assessment. He had a 20-year career in the US Air Force, in which he held a number of positions, including senior bioenvi- ronmental engineering program manager in the Office of the Air Force Surgeon General. In that position, he developed and managed occupational-health, indus- trial-hygiene, and environmental-protection programs worldwide. Dr. Bishop has served on several National Research Council committees, including the Committee on Acute Exposure Guideline Levels and the Committee on Toxico- logical Risks to Deployed Military Personnel. He received his MS in engineer- ing from the University of California, Los Angeles, and his PhD in environ- mental health sciences from the University of California, Berkeley. Margit L. Bleecker is director of the Center for Occupational and Environ- mental Neurology in Baltimore, Maryland. Her research interests are in clinical industrial neurotoxicology and occupational neurology. Dr. Bleecker was a member of the National Research Council Committee on Tetrachloroethylene and the Institute of Medicine Committee to Review the Health Effects in Viet- nam Veterans of Exposure to Herbicides and Committee on the DOD Persian Gulf Syndrome Comprehensive Clinical Evaluation Program. She received her PhD from the State University of New York Downstate Medical Center and her MD from the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine. Dr. Bleecker is certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology. Lisa M. Brosseau is associate professor in the Division of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences of the University of Minnesota School of Public Health. Her research interests are in the performance of respiratory protection devices, aerosol measurement, filtration, and health and safety interventions. Dr. Brosseau is a former chair of ACGIH’s Chemical Substances Threshold Limit Value Committee and past chair of the organization’s Board of Directors. She has been on several National Research Council committees, including the Committee on Full System Testing and Evaluation of Personal Protection Equipment Ensembles in Simulated Chemical and Biological Warfare Environ- ments. She received her MS and ScD in industrial hygiene from Harvard Uni- versity and is certified by the American Board of Industrial Hygiene. Rose H. Goldman is the former chief of the Division of Occupational and Envi- ronmental Medicine of Cambridge Health Alliance and is currently an associate professor in the Department of Environmental Health of the Harvard School of

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176 Potential Health Risks to DOD Firing-Range Personnel Public Health and associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. Her research interests are in neurotoxicity, metals, pediatric environmental health, and innovative education in environmental and occupational medicine. Dr. Goldman was a member of two Institute of Medicine Committees on Gulf War and Health, which evaluated potential health effects of exposure to pesti- cides and Sarin, the National Research Council Committee on Handling and Disposal of Biohazards from the Laboratory, and the National Research Council Committee to Review the OMB Risk Assessment Bulletin. She received her MD from the Yale University School of Medicine and her MS and MPH from the Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Goldman is certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine and by the American Board of Preventive Medicine in occupational medicine. Joseph H. Graziano is professor of environmental health sciences and pharma- cology at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. His re- search career has been devoted to understanding the consequences of exposure to metals, on both the molecular and population levels. Dr. Graziano’s past re- search was devoted to lead poisoning and contributed to understanding of the adverse effects of lead exposure on childhood development. He also discovered and developed 2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA; Succimer), a drug now widely used around the world to treat childhood lead poisoning. More recently, his research has been aimed at understanding the consequences of arsenic expo- sure for the Bangladeshi population and at devising strategies to reduce toxicity. Dr. Graziano received his PhD from Rutgers, the State University of New Jer- sey. Sheryl A. Milz is chair of and associate professor in the Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine of the University of Toledo and is a certified industrial hygienist. Her research interests are in human exposure assessments, risk assessment, and environmental and occupational epidemiology. Before join- ing the university, she was an industrial hygienist and safety and occupational manager at the Great Lakes Naval Hospital, where she gained experience in evaluating firing ranges for lead exposure and ventilation requirements. Dr. Milz has been active in the American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA) and ACGIH. She was chair of the AIHA Exposure Assessment Strategies Commit- tee and currently serves on the ACGIH Agricultural Safety and Health Commit- tee. She received her MS in preventive medicine (epidemiology) from Ohio State University and her PhD in public health sciences (industrial hygiene) from the University of Illinois at Chicago. Sung Kyun Park is an assistant professor of epidemiology at the University of Michigan School of Public Health. He also has a joint appointment in the De- partment of Environmental Health Sciences. His research has focused on the health effects of environmental exposures—such as exposures to air pollution, heavy metals (including lead, cadmium, arsenic, and mercury), bisphenol-A, and

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Appendix 177 noise—in aging populations. Health end points of interest include cardiovascular outcomes (hypertension, heart-rate variability, and homocysteine), metabolic disorders (type-2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome), lung function, and age- related diseases (age-related hearing loss, cataracts, and osteoporosis). Dr. Park received his MPH in environmental health from Seoul National University and his ScD in environmental epidemiology from the Harvard School of Public Health. Mark A. Roberts is a principal scientist and center director for Occupational and Environmental Heath at Exponent. He has a wide array of experiences in clinical occupational and environmental medicine and in epidemiologic studies of health complaints in communities and industrial settings. His professional training also covers a broad spectrum from public health to corporate medicine. He has 17 years of experience in the Oklahoma State Department of Health. His corporate experience includes serving as corporate medical director of BP. Dr. Roberts received his MD, MPH, and PhD in biostatistics and epidemiology from the University of Oklahoma. He is licensed by the American Board of Preven- tive Medicine in occupational medicine. Brisa N. Sanchez is assistant professor in the Department of Biostatistics of the University of Michigan School of Public Health. Her research interests are in statistical methods applicable to environmental and social epidemiology and health disparities. Her methodologic work involves developing robust fitting procedures and diagnostics for structural equation models and using the methods in applications to environmental health problems, such as in utero lead exposure and its effect on child development. Dr. Sanchez received her MS in statistics from the University of Texas at El Paso and her MSc and PhD in biostatistics from Harvard University. Brian S. Schwartz is a professor in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. He also is codirector of the university’s Program on Global Sustainability and Health and codirector of the Joint Geisinger–Johns Hopkins Environmental Health Institute. His research applies the methods of occupational, environmental, and molecular epidemiology to studying the health effects of chemicals. Health effects of inter- est include those in the central nervous system (such as cognitive functioning and brain structure), peripheral nervous system, cardiovascular system, and renal system. Much of his work has focused on the health effects of metals (such as lead, mercury, and cadmium) and organic compounds (such as polychlorinated biphenyls, and hydrocarbon solvents). He is particularly interested in the impor- tance of recent vs lifetime cumulative dose, the timing of the dose during the lifespan and its relation to health effects, and how these types of exposure con- tribute to acute, reversible health effects and chronic, probably irreversible health effects. Dr. Schwartz received his MD from Northwestern University and his MS in clinical epidemiology from the University of Pennsylvania. He is cer-

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178 Potential Health Risks to DOD Firing-Range Personnel tified by the American Board of Internal Medicine and by the American Board of Preventive Medicine in occupational medicine. Lauren Zeise is deputy director for scientific affairs of the California Environ- mental Protection Agency’s Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assess- ment. She oversees or is otherwise involved in a variety of California’s risk- assessment activities and the development of frameworks and methods for as- sessing toxicity, cumulative impact, nanotechnology, green chemistry and safer alternatives, and susceptible populations. She also is involved in the California Environmental Contaminant Biomonitoring Program. Dr. Zeise was the 2008 recipient of the Society of Risk Analysis Outstanding Practitioners Award. She has served on advisory boards and committees of the Environmental Protection Agency, the Office of Technology Assessment, the World Health Organization, and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. Dr. Zeise has served on numerous National Research Council and Institute of Medicine com- mittees and boards. She is currently a member of the Committee on Use of Emerging Science for Environmental Health Decisions. She received her PhD from Harvard University. Judith T. Zelikoff is a professor in the Department of Environmental Medicine of the New York University Medical Center. Her research interests are in im- munotoxicity and reproductive and developmental toxicity associated with in- haled metal oxide nanomaterials, respirable particulate matter, and metal- bearing air-pollution mixtures. She is on the National Toxicology Program Board of Scientific Councilors and is an active member of the Society of Toxi- cology; she was president of the Metals Specialty Section and of the Immu- notoxicity Specialty Section and currently serves on the Board of Councilors and is the secretary-elect of the society. Dr. Zelikoff was a member of the Na- tional Research Council Committee on Spacecraft Exposure Guidelines. She received her MS in microbiology and her PhD in experimental pathology from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey.