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E Committee and Staff Biographies ELAINE T. CULLEN (Cochair) is the vice president of Safety Solutions International Northwest Operations. She has over 38 years of experience working to improve safety and health in mining, beginning her career with the U.S. Bureau of Mines. She was a principal investigator for the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Spokane Research Lab, where she led a research team to develop and evaluate effective safety training for miners. Dr. Cullen has created 12 safety training videos, 9 for the mining industry, 2 for oil and gas production, and 1 for commercial salmon fishing. Dr. Cullen has won numerous national and international awards for her work, including a Telly Award for her documentary on the Sunshine Mine fire that killed 91 miners. She is particularly interested in the power that stories have to connect to trainees and convince them to work more safely. Dr. Cullen is a member of the American Society of Safety Engineers, Women in Safety Engineering, the Society for Mining, Metallurgy, and Exploration, the National Safety Council, and the International Society for Mine Safety Professionals, and is a Certified Mine Safety Professional as well as a Mine Safety and Health Administration certified safety trainer for both surface and underground. She is currently working on assessing safety cultures on mine sites and on an occupational ethnography of land-based oil and gas workers, and is using the findings of her study to create training materials for those working on drill and service rigs. Dr. Cullen is also member of the National Research Council Committee on Earth Resources. She earned a B.A., M.B.A., and Ph.D. from Gonzaga University. CHARLES FAIRHURST (NAE) (Cochair) is professor emeritus from the University of Minnesota and senior consulting engineer for Itasca Consulting Group, Inc. His leadership in rock mechanics has led to numerous innovations in the field. He is the author of more than 100 publications that span nearly all aspects of rock mechanics and rock engineering. His primary professional interests are rock mechanics and its application to problems in civil, mining, petroleum engineering, engineered geothermal systems (EGSs) and the geological isolation of nuclear waste. His current interests include the integration of analytical and numerical modeling procedures with field observations, to guide practical design in rock engineering. Dr. Fairhurst is a former president of the International Society for Rock Mechanics; fellow of the American Rock Mechanics Association; and member of the American Institute of Mining Engineers; American Society of Civil Engineers, and Sigma Xi. He is a member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences and has been awarded honorary doctorate degrees by the University of Nancy, France; Techical University, St. Petersburg, Russia; University of Sheffield, England; and University of Minnesota. He is advisory professor of Tongji Univeristy, China. Dr. Fairhurst received a Ph.D. in mining engineering from Sheffield University. 374 Prepublication Version

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APPENDIX E 375 KATHLEEN A. ALFANO is the director and principal investigator of the National Science Foundation (NSF) Advanced Technological Education (ATE) CREATE Renewable Energy Center of Excellence. Since 1996, she has led a community college consortium (CREATE) focused on addressing emerging engineering technology curriculum needs through education–industry partnerships. As Director of NSF’s Renewable Energy Center of Excellence, she is involved in efforts across the United States to define and implement credit technician curricula in many areas of renewable energy, including wind, solar, geothermal, and energy efficiency. She served as a program director and colead for the ATE Program at the NSF in 2007-2008, and previously as dean of Academic Computing and Professional Programs, and she continues to be a faculty member at the College of the Canyons. She has over 30 years of successful faculty leadership, administration of technical departments, and leadership and evaluation of state and federal curriculum projects, especially in the areas of technical education. Dr. Alfano has a B.S. in chemistry, and M.S. in education/counseling, and a Ph.D. from UCLA in higher education, work, and adult development. BURT S. BARNOW is the Amsterdam Professor of Public Service and Economics in the Trachtenberg School of Public Policy and Public Administration at George Washington University. Dr. Barnow has over 30 years of experience as an economist and manager of research projects in the fields of workforce development, program evaluation, performance analysis, labor economics, welfare, poverty, child support, and fatherhood initiatives. He has extensive experience conducting research on implementation and effectiveness of large government programs. His current and recent research includes a project to develop and evaluate demonstrations that test innovative strategies to promote self-sufficiency for low-income families for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and an assessment of the implementation of the workforce provisions of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Prior to coming to George Washington University, Dr. Barnow was associate director for research at Johns Hopkins University Institute for Policy Studies, where he worked for 18 years. Dr. Barnow has also worked for the Lewin Group, U.S. Department of Labor (including 4 years as director of the Office of Research and Evaluation in the Employment and Training Administration), and the University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Barnow has served on nine other National Research Council committees. He has a B.S. degree in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in economics from the University of Wisconsin at Madison. SALLY M. BENSON is the director of Stanford University’s Global Climate and Energy Project (GCEP) and a research professor in the Department of Energy Resources Engineering (ERE), in the School of Earth Sciences. The ERE research group investigates fundamental characteristics of carbon dioxide storage in geological formations as a means of climate change mitigation. Prior to joining GCEP, Dr. Benson worked at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, serving in a number of capacities, including division director for Earth Sciences, associate laboratory director for Energy Sciences, and deputy director for Operations. She is the author and coauthor of over 160 scientific publications. Dr. Benson received a B.S. degree in geology from Barnard Prepublication Version

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376 APPENDIX E College at Columbia University and an M.S. and Ph.D. in materials science and mineral engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. EMILY DeROCCO is the principal of E3, a Washington, D.C.-based strategic consulting practice focused on linking education, workforce, and economic development assets for competitive advantage. Dr. DeRocco is the immediate past president of The Manufacturing Institute where she launched and implemented a strategic national agenda focused on education reform and workforce development, innovation support and services, and research on behalf of U.S. manufacturers. Under her leadership, the Institute developed and deployed a system of nationally portable, industry-recognized manufacturing skills certifications now influencing secondary and postsecondary education reform efforts in 36 states; chaired the National Thought Leaders Forum on linking the nation’s high-performance supercomputing capacity to manufacturers; and released leading-edge research including The Facts About Modern Manufacturing; The Innovation Imperative: How U.S. Manufacturing Can Restore Its Edge; The Manufacturing Industry’s Structural Cost Study; People & Profitability; and The Annual Index of the Public Perception About Modern Manufacturing. Prior to her leadership in U.S. manufacturing, Dr. DeRocco was nominated by President Bush and confirmed by the U.S. Senate as the Assistant Secretary of Labor in 2001. She currently serves on the Board of Directors of Western Governors University and the Harrisburg University of Science and Technology as well as the Board of Advisors to the University of Mississippi’s Center for Manufacturing Excellence. Dr. DeRocco is a proud graduate of The Pennsylvania State University and received her Juris Doctorate from the Georgetown Law Center. LEIGH FREEMAN is the principal and general manager of Downing Teal, Inc. He has over 30 years of domestic and international experience in the resource industries. Early in his career, Mr. Freeman served in technical, management, and executive positions with large and small resource companies, including 10 years with Placer Dome. He cofounded Orvana Minerals, where he served on its board of directors as well as serving as president. Mr. Freeman is a regular speaker at international mining and investment conferences on the topics of talent, minerals education, innovation, sustainable development, and the business of mining. He is a recognized advocate of the junior mining sector. He serves in leadership roles for the Society of Mining Engineers, Society of Economic Geologists, Industrial Minerals Association, International Center for Appropriate and Sustainable Technologies, as well as Montana Tech, South Dakota School of Mines, University of Arizona, and Queen’s University. Mr. Freeman received his B.S. in geological engineering from Montana Tech of the University of Montana. JOHN A. PAPPAS is the director of the Texas A&M Wind Energy Center, the associate director of the Texas A&M Energy Engineering Institute and the academic cochair of The Wind Alliance Technical Committee. He previously was part of the executive management team of the Center for Electromechanics, one of the largest research institutes at the University of Texas. Mr. Pappas served as the program manager and director of business development as well as principal investigator on numerous projects, including multigigawatt generators for electric accelerators, novel high-power converter Prepublication Version

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APPENDIX E 377 systems, controls and measurement systems for high-voltage power supplies, and advanced manufacturing processes for the oil and specialty materials industries. Mr. Pappas is a member of the American Wind Energy Association and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and is the author of 25 refereed papers in IEEE publications. Mr. Pappas is a registered professional engineer. He holds a BSEE from the New Jersey Institute of Technology and an M.S. in engineering from the University of Texas at Austin. ROY RADNER (NAS) is Leonard N. Stern School Professor of Business at New York University (NYU). He is also a professor of economics and information systems at the Stern School, and professor of environmental studies at NYU. Prior to joining NYU, he was a distinguished member of technical staff at AT&T Bell Laboratories, and professor of economics and statistics at the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Radner’s research interests include bounded rationality in decision making, self-enforcing global climate change treaties, strategic analyses of petty corruption in developing countries, theories of information processing and decentralization within firms, and pricing of information technology. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a distinguished fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the American Economic Association, a past president of the Econometric Society, an overseas fellow of Churchill College, Cambridge, and a past recipient of a Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship. Dr. Radner received his Ph.B. (with Honors), his B.S. and M.S. in mathematics, and Ph.D. in mathematical statistics from the University of Chicago. JOEL L. RENNER is a geothermal consultant with over 30 years of research and management experience related to mineral and energy resources. His experience includes management of multidisciplinary research groups, business development, resource assessment, and independent research. Mr. Renner is an internationally recognized expert on geothermal energy. Prior to becoming an independent consultant, Mr. Renner worked for over 20 years with the Idaho National Laboratory, where he was a principal investigator and manager of the Geothermal Program. Mr. Renner has provided technical expertise on geothermal resources to the Department of Energy. He received a B.A. in mathematics from Carleton College and an M.S. in geology from the University of Minnesota, and he had a Ph.D. candidacy in applied earth science at Stanford University. He is a member of the Geothermal Resources Council, a former member of its board of directors and recipient of its Joseph W. Aidlin award. Mr. Renner is also a member of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, American Geophysical Union, and the Geological Society of Minnesota. STERLING J. RIDEOUT, JR. is the assistant director of program support in the Office of Surface Mining of the U.S. Department of the Interior. He is responsible for developing and implementing national policies, guidelines, and technical guidance for active and abandoned mine land reclamation in order to implement the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act. He also oversees policy direction on state, federal, and Indian regulatory as well as abandoned mine lands programs, grants administration, reclamation technology programs, bonding and the Applicant/Violator System and Prepublication Version

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378 APPENDIX E technical training program. Mr. Rideout received a B.S. degree in chemistry from Morehouse College, and an M.S. in technology management and an M.B.A. from the University of Maryland. KENNETH C. ROGERS is a retired commissioner of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, to which he was appointed in 1987. Prior to his appointment to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Dr. Rogers was the president of Stevens Institute of Technology, where he had also served as acting provost/dean of faculty. His expertise includes particle-accelerator, plasma, and high-energy particle physics and physical electronics, as well as nuclear facility operations. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Nuclear Society, and he is a recipient of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Millennium Award Medal. Dr. Rogers received a B.S. in physics from St. Lawrence University and an M.A. and a Ph.D. in physics from Columbia University. REGINAL SPILLER is the chief executive officer of Azimuth. Previously he was the chief operating officer for Allied Energy and cofounder of Frontera Resources, and served as executive advisor, Exploration and Technology. Mr. Spiller was an executive vice president at Frontera and in charge of the company's exploration and production activities from May 1996 to March 2009. Mr. Spiller has over 25 years of experience in the international oil and gas industry. He was deputy assistant secretary for gas and petroleum technologies at the U.S. Department of Energy, and served as the international exploration manager for Maxus Energy Corporation. Mr. Spiller is an active member of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists and the National Association of Black Geologists and Geophysicists. He is currently a member of the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources and has previously served on the NRC Committee on Earth Resources and two National Research Council ad hoc study committees. Mr. Spiller holds an M.S. degree in hydrogeology from The Pennsylvania State University and a B.S. in geology from the State University of New York. GERARD (“JERRY”) VENTRE is a consultant in photovoltaic (PV) systems engineering, specializing in workforce development, system design, and product assurance. He has over 35 years of experience in research, development, design, systems analysis, and education. For 20 of those years, he led the PV and distributed power programs at the Florida Solar Energy Center, a research institute of the University of Central Florida. During that time he also managed the U.S. DOE’s Photovoltaic Southeast Regional Experiment Station, with emphasis on test, evaluation, and application of PV and advanced technologies. He developed the Florida Photovoltaic Buildings Program, including the most comprehensive PV quality assurance program in the United States. Workforce activities have included a survey of workforce needs for the PV industry; task analyses, curriculum and training program development for both practitioners and trainers; chair of a national committee on PV entry-level learning objectives for the North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners; senior advisor to the national administrator for the Solar Instructor Training Network; consultant and advisor to the Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC) and the Institute for Sustainable Power Quality accreditation and certification programs; and contributing Prepublication Version

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APPENDIX E 379 author of IREC’s document on best practices and recommended guidelines for renewable energy training. He has taught at the graduate and undergraduate levels, including PV systems, has over 150 technical publications, and is coauthor with Roger Messenger of the highly regarded text entitled Photovoltaic Systems Engineering. Dr. Ventre received his B.S. degree in aerospace engineering, and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in aerospace engineering and applied mechanics from the University of Cincinnati. National Research Council Staff CY BUTNER is a senior program officer with the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources of the National Academies’ National Research Council (NRC). He has been with the NRC for 15 years, during which time he has served with several boards on programs including the U.S. Energy and Mining Industries Workforce Study, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology and Army Research Laboratory Peer Assessment Programs. He also has participated in a number of ad hoc studies, covering a range of topics. Before joining the NRC, Mr. Butner worked with two aerospace consulting firms, supporting space and aeronautics technology development programs at NASA Headquarters. Before that, he worked for RCA as a satellite solar array engineer, for NASA at the Goddard Space Flight Center as a science co-op student and a materials engineer, and for the New Mexico Environmental Improvement Agency as a statistician. Mr. Butner has B.S. and M.S. degrees in physics from the American University and a B.S. degree in mathematics from the University of New Mexico. ELIZABETH A. EIDE is director of the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources at the National Research Council (NRC). Prior to joining the NRC as a staff officer in 2005, she served as a researcher, team leader, and laboratory manager for 12 years at the Geological Survey of Norway in Trondheim. While in Norway her research included basic and applied projects related to isotope geochronology, mineralogy and petrology, and crustal processes. Her publications include more than 40 journal articles and book chapters, and 10 Geological Survey reports. She has overseen 10 NRC studies. She completed a Ph.D. in geology at Stanford University and received a B.A. in geology from Franklin and Marshall College. GAIL GREENFIELD is a senior program officer with the Board on Higher Education and Workforce at the National Research Council (NRC). Recent studies in which she has been involved include: Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence; Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Workforce Needs for the U.S. Department of Defense and the U.S. Defense Industrial Base; and Emerging Workforce Trends in the U.S. Energy and Mining Industries. Prior to joining NRC, Gail was an assistant professor of economics at the College of Wooster and, more recently, a consultant at Mercer in Washington, D.C. Gail received her Ph.D. in economics from Claremont Graduate University and her bachelor’s degree in business economics from the University of California, Santa Barbara. NICHOLAS D. ROGERS is a financial and research associate with the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources, National Research Council. He received a B.A. in history, with a focus on the history of science and early American history, from Western Connecticut Prepublication Version

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380 APPENDIX E State University in 2004. He began working for the National Academies in 2006 and supports the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources on a wide range of areas from earth resources to geographical and mapping sciences. COURTNEY GIBBS is a program associate with the National Research Council Board on Earth Sciences and Resources. She received her degree in graphic design from the Pittsburgh Technical Institute in 2000 and began working for the National Academies in 2004. Prior to her work with the board, Ms. Gibbs supported the Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board and the former Board on Radiation Effects Research. JASON R. ORTEGO is a research associate with the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources at the National Academies. He received a B.A. in English from Louisiana State University in 2004 and an M.A. in international affairs from George Washington University in 2008. He began working for the National Academies in 2008 with the Board on Energy and Environmental Systems, and in 2009 he joined the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources. CHANDA T. IJAMES is a senior program assistant with the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources at the National Academies. She received a B.S. in psychology from the University of Maryland University College and is pursuing an M.Ed. in instructional technology from the University of Maryland University College. She began working for the National Research Council Board on Earth Sciences and Resources in 2011. Prepublication Version