Appendix

Committee Biographic Information

Stephen L. Hauser, MD (Chair), is the Robert A. Fishman Distinguished Professor and chair of the Department of Neurology of the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). Dr. Hauser is a graduate of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Phi Beta Kappa) and the Harvard Medical School (magna cum laude). He trained in internal medicine at the New York Hospital–Cornell Medical Center, in neurology at the Massachusetts General Hospital, and in immunology at the Harvard Medical School and the Institute Pasteur in Paris, France, and he was a faculty member of the Harvard Medical School before moving to UCSF in 1992. Dr. Hauser is a neuroimmunologist, and his research has advanced the understanding of the genetic basis and immune mechanisms and treatment for multiple sclerosis. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the American Academy of Physicians and is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academies. Dr. Hauser has served on several IOM committees and served as the chair of the Committee on Gulf War and Health: Health Effects of Serving in the Gulf War, Update 2009. He is an editor of the textbook Harrison’s Principles of Internal Medicine, and editor-in-chief of Annals of Neurology. He has served as president of the American Neurological Association and president of the medical staff at UCSF. He also serves on several scientific advisory boards for nonprofit organizations. Dr. Hauser has received numerous awards and honors for his work, including the Jacob Javits Neuroscience Investigator Award and the 2008 John Dystel Prize for Multiple Sclerosis Research. In April, 2010, Dr. Hauser was appointed by President Obama to the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues, which is charged with advising



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Appendix Committee Biographic Information Stephen L. Hauser, MD (Chair), is the Robert A. Fishman Distinguished Professor and chair of the Department of Neurology of the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). Dr. Hauser is a graduate of the Massa- chusetts Institute of Technology (Phi Beta Kappa) and the Harvard Medi- cal School (magna cum laude). He trained in internal medicine at the New York Hospital–Cornell Medical Center, in neurology at the Massachusetts General Hospital, and in immunology at the Harvard Medical School and the Institute Pasteur in Paris, France, and he was a faculty member of the Harvard Medical School before moving to UCSF in 1992. Dr. Hauser is a neuroimmunologist, and his research has advanced the understanding of the genetic basis and immune mechanisms and treatment for multiple sclerosis. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the American Academy of Physicians and is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academies. Dr. Hauser has served on several IOM committees and served as the chair of the Committee on Gulf War and Health: Health Effects of Serving in the Gulf War, Update 2009. He is an editor of the textbook Harrison’s Principles of Internal Medicine, and editor-in-chief of Annals of Neurology. He has served as president of the American Neurological Association and president of the medical staff at UCSF. He also serves on several scientific advisory boards for nonprofit organizations. Dr. Hauser has received numerous awards and honors for his work, including the Jacob Javits Neuroscience Investigator Award and the 2008 John Dystel Prize for Multiple Sclerosis Research. In April, 2010, Dr. Hauser was appointed by President Obama to the Presidential Com- mission for the Study of Bioethical Issues, which is charged with advising 201

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202 GULF WAR AND HEALTH the president on issues that may emerge from advances in biomedicine and related fields of science and technology. Jeffrey J. Bazarian, MD, MPH, is associate professor of emergency medi- cine, neurology, and neurosurgery at the Center for Neural Development and Disease of the University of Rochester Medical Center. He graduated from Brown University and from the University of Rochester School of Medicine. He completed his residency training in internal medicine and has a master’s degree in public health. Dr. Bazarian was one of the first emergency physicians to receive a 5-year Career Development Award from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. The focus of his research was traumatic brain injury (TBI) epidemiology and outcomes. Dr. Bazarian’s research interest has recently shifted to finding better ways to diagnose TBI, especially concussion. He assembled a diverse group of researchers in the university to address the problem and created a trans- lational research team. Those efforts earned him an R01 award in 2007 from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to develop a blood test for brain injury; he was one of only a handful of emergency physicians to receive such a grant. Dr. Bazarian has served on several TBI-related task forces and panels for the Centers for Disease Con- trol and Prevention, the National Institutes of Health, and the National Science Foundation. He is currently serving on an Institute of Medicine committee that is examining readjustment needs in returning Iraq and Afghanistan active-duty military personnel, veterans, family members, and affected communities. Ibolja Cernak, MD, PhD, ME, MHS, is the first chair of military and veter- ans’ clinical rehabilitation in the University of Alberta, Canada. Dr. Cernak most recently was the medical director in the Biomedical Business Area of the Applied Physics Laboratory of Johns Hopkins University. Previously, she served on the battlefield as a first responder and conducted controlled clinical research to characterize complex neuroendocrine, neurologic, bio- chemical, and metabolic responses to blast exposure within the earliest posttraumatic period (0–5 minutes after trauma). Her research interests are in mechanisms of neuronal cell death and related neurologic deficits induced by traumatic brain injury, blunt head trauma, and war-induced (explosion-induced) blast neurotrauma. Dr. Cernak received her MD from the Medical School of the University of Belgrade, Yugoslavia; her MS in biomedical engineering from the Center of Multidisciplinary Studies of the University of Belgrade; her PhD in pathophysiology and neuroscience from the Military Medical Academy of the University of Belgrade; and her MS in homeland security in public health preparedness from the Pennsylvania State University. She has served on previous Institute of Medicine commit-

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APPENDIX 203 tees, including the Committee on Gulf War and Health: Brain Injury in Veterans and Long-Term Health Outcomes and the Committee on Read- justment Needs of Military Personnel, Veterans, and Their Families. Lin Chang, MD, is a professor of medicine in the Department of Medicine, Division of Digestive Diseases, and the co-director of the Gail and Gerald Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress of the David Geffen School of Medicine of University of California, Los Angeles. Dr. Chang’s clinical expertise is in functional gastrointestinal disorders, which include irritable- bowel syndrome (IBS), chronic constipation, and functional dyspepsia. Her research focuses on the pathophysiology and health outcomes of IBS related to stress; sex differences, neuroendocrine alterations, and comorbidity with fibromyalgia; and treatment for IBS. She is a funded National Institutes of Health investigator studying the central and peripheral mechanisms that underlie IBS. She is the recipient of the Janssen Award in Gastroenterol- ogy for Basic or Clinical Research and the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) Distinguished Clinician Award. Dr. Chang is the author of more than 80 original research articles, 50 review articles, and 19 book chapters on her specialty interests. She is a fellow of the AGA and the American College of Gastroenterology and a member of the Society for Neuroscience. She is also a member of the Rome Foundation Board of Directors. Dr. Chang is the president of the American Neurogastroenterol- ogy and Motility Society. She served on the Food and Drug Administration Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee from 2005 to 2010 and has also chaired the committee. Kimberly Cockerham, MD, FACS, is a board-certified ophthalmologist in private practice in the Central Valley and Silicon Valley of Califor- nia (Cupertino, Los Altos, Manteca, and Stockton). She is an adjunct clinical associate professor in the Department of Ophthalmology of Stan- ford University School of Medicine. Her professional affiliations include the American Academy of Ophthalmology, the North American Neuro- Ophthalmology Society, and the American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. Her past research work includes a Department of Defense grant for a reanimation of damaged nerve-muscle complexes administered through Palo Alto Institute for Research and Education at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center and a VA polytrauma study that investigated the effects of blast injuries on veterans of the Afghanistan and Iraq wars. Dr. Cockerham graduated with cum laude honors from the University of California San Diego. While serving for 15 years as an officer in the US Army, she obtained her MD from George Washington University Medical School and completed her internship in general surgery, her resi- dency in ophthalmology, and two fellowships in neuro-ophthalmology and

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204 GULF WAR AND HEALTH oculoplastics and orbital disease. In her final 5 years of military service, she was the director of oculoplastics and orbital surgery and reconstruction at Walter Reed Army Medical Center. Karen J. Cruickshanks, PhD, is a professor of ophthalmology and visual sci- ences and population health sciences at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health. She completed her PhD in epidemiology at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. Her research focuses on the epidemiology of age-related sensory disorders, cog- nitive impairment, and diabetes and its complications. The Epidemiology of Hearing Loss Study and the Beaver Dam Offspring Study are funded by the National Institute on Aging to study hearing, olfactory, and cognitive impairments in two population-based cohorts. Her professional affiliations include the Institute on Aging at the University of Wisconsin, the Society for Epidemiologic Research, the Association for Research in Vision and Oph- thalmology, the American Epidemiological Society, the American Auditory Society, the Association for Chemoreception Sciences, and the American Heart Association. She has served on previous Institute of Medicine com- mittees, including the Committee on Assessment of Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in the Military Service from WWII to the Present and the Committee to Review the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Hear- ing Loss Research Program. Francesca Dominici, PhD, is a professor in the Department of Biosta- tistics of the Harvard School of Public Health and the associate dean of information technology. Dr. Dominici’s research has focused on the interface between the methodologic development of hierarchic models and their applications to multilevel data. She has extensive experience in the development of statistical methods and their applications to clinical trials, toxicology, biology, and environmental epidemiology. She is a member of numerous professional societies, including the American Statistical Associa- tion, the International Biometric Society, and the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology. She is the senior editor of Chapman & Hall/ CRC Texts in Statistical Science series, and associate editor of the Journal of the Royal Statistical Society. Dr. Dominici has served on a number of National Academies committees, including the Committee on Gulf War and Health: Review of the Medical Literature Relative to Gulf War Veterans’ Health; the Committee to Assess Potential Health Effects from Exposures to PAVE PAWS Low-Level Phased Array Radiofrequency Energy; and the Committee on the Utility of Proximity-Based Herbicide Exposure Assess- ment in Epidemiologic Studies of Vietnam Veterans. Dr. Dominici received her PhD in statistics from the University of Padua, Italy.

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APPENDIX 205 Judy R. Dubno, PhD, is a professor and director of research in the Depart- ment of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery of the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston. Her research focuses on auditory percep- tion, sensorineural hearing loss, and speech recognition. Dr. Dubno earned a PhD in speech and hearing science from the City University of New York Graduate Center and completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of California, Los Angeles, School of Medicine. Dr. Dubno’s research on auditory-system function has improved the understanding of the encod- ing of auditory information in simple sounds and speech, and how those abilities change in adverse listening conditions and with training, age, and hearing loss. Dr. Dubno sits on editorial boards, national scientific boards, and National Institutes of Health (NIH) review panels. In addition to com- mittee service in national scientific societies, she has served as president of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology, as a member of the NIH’s National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Advisory Council, and as vice president and president-elect of the Acousti- cal Society of America. She has served on previous Institute of Medicine committees, including the Committee on Noise-Induced Hearing Loss and Tinnitus Associated with Military Service from World War II to the Pres- ent and the Committee to Review the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Hearing Loss Research Program. Theodore J. Iwashyna, MD, PhD, is an associate professor of internal medi- cine in the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine of the Uni- versity of Michigan. He is also a faculty associate of the Survey Research Center of the Institute for Social Research and a research scientist in the VA (Department of Veterans Affairs) Center for Clinical Management Research in Ann Arbor. His clinical interests are in the organization and outcomes of care for the critically ill; in particular, a major focus of his recent work has been understanding the causal links between severe sepsis and disability and cognitive impairment. Dr. Iwashyna is a member of several profes- sional societies, including the American Thoracic Society and the Society of Critical Care Medicine. He received his AB from Princeton University in molecular biology, his MD from the Pritzker School of Medicine of the University of Chicago, and his PhD from the Harris School of Public Policy of the University of Chicago. He is board certified in internal medicine, pulmonary medicine, and critical care. He has grants from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, the VA Health Services Research and Development Service, and the Society of Critical Care Medicine. S. Claiborne Johnston, MD, PhD, is a professor of neurology and epidemi- ology, associate vice chancellor of research, and director of the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Clinical and Translational Science

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206 GULF WAR AND HEALTH Institute. He received his undergraduate education at Amherst College and completed medical school at Harvard University. He received a PhD in epidemiology from the University of California, Berkeley. He completed his residency in neurology at UCSF, where he later trained in vascular neurol- ogy. Dr. Johnston is the author of more than 200 publications in scientific journals and has won several national awards for his research and teaching. He has led several large cohort studies of cerebrovascular disease and three multicenter randomized trials. He studies stroke treatment and prevention using the tools of computer science and epidemiology. Dr. Johnston is the executive vice editor of the Annals of Neurology and served on the editorial boards of several other journals. He has been honored with the American Academy of Neurology’s Pessin Prize for Stroke Leadership and the Ameri- can Stroke Association’s Siekert New Investigator Award. He was a member of the California Health Disease and Stroke Prevention Advisory Council, which advises the Department of Health Services, and codirector of preven- tion education programs for the National Stroke Association. S. Andrew Josephson, MD, is a neurologist who specializes in neurovascu- lar and neurologic disorders. He is the director of the University of Cali- fornia, San Francisco (UCSF) Neurohospitalist Program and Fellowship, vice-chairman of the Department of Neurology, and the medical director of inpatient neurology. After graduating from Stanford University, Dr. Josephson earned a medical degree at Washington University in Saint Louis. He completed an internship in internal medicine and a residency in neurol- ogy at UCSF, where he was chief resident. He also completed fellowships in neurovascular neurology and behavioral neurology at UCSF. His current research focuses on systems and quality of inpatient neurologic care, includ- ing stroke, neurocritical care, and cognitive dysfunction. He is an associate professor of clinical neurology and holds the Carmen Castro Franceschi and Gladyne K. Mitchell Neurohospitalist Distinguished Professorship. Kenneth W. Kizer, MD, MPH, is director of the Institute for Population Health Improvement of the University of California, Davis (UCD) Health System and Distinguished Professor in the UCD School of Medicine and Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing. He is one of very few persons elected to both the Institute of Medicine and the National Academy of Public Administration. Dr. Kizer’s professional experience includes positions in academe and in the public and private sectors. He has been president, CEO, and chairman of the Medsphere Systems Corporation; founding president and CEO of the National Quality Forum; undersecretary for health in the US Department of Veterans Affairs and CEO of the nation’s largest health care system; director of the California Department of Health Services; and

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APPENDIX 207 director of the California Emergency Medical Services Authority. He has served on the US Preventive Services Task Force and as chairman of the Board of the California Wellness Foundation and on the governing boards of a number of managed-care and health information technology compa- nies, foundations, professional associations, and nonprofit organizations. He has also served as an adviser to numerous foreign countries on health- related matters. Dr. Kizer is an honors graduate of Stanford University and the University of California, Los Angeles, and the recipient of two honorary doctorates. He is board certified in 6 medical specialties or subspecialties and he is the author of more than 400 articles, book chapters, and other reports. He is a fellow or distinguished fellow of 10 professional societies, a Fellow National of the international Explorer’s Club, a founding member and past president of the international Wilderness Medical Society, and a former US Navy diver and diving medical officer. William C. Mann, PhD, OTRB, is a Distinguished Professor and chair of occupational therapy, the director of the PhD Program in Rehabilitation Science, and the director of the Florida Institute on Disability and Reha- bilitation (FIDR) of the University of Florida (UF). Within FIDR, Dr. Mann leads a Department of Defense–funded research initiative that is address- ing issues related to rehabilitation of people who have combat injuries. He also serves as the director of the Rehabilitation Outcomes Research Center Research Enhancement Award Program of the North Florida/South Georgia Veterans Health System in Gainesville, Florida. Dr. Mann served as the principal investigator for the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research–funded Rehabilitation Engineering Research Cen- ter on Aging from 1991 to 2007; this work included a focus on uses of information technology in telehealth and home health and behavior moni- toring. Before his appointment at UF, he was a professor at the University at Buffalo for 25 years. Dr. Mann is the author of more than 145 articles and book chapters on aging and independence and the author/editor of 5 books, and he was founder and from 1990 to 2000 coeditor of the journal Technology and Disability. He has served as the conference chair for the 1999, 2003, 2006, and 2008 International Conference on Aging, Dis- ability and Independence and on the boards of the American Society on Aging and the Florida Council on Aging. His research and rehabilitation experience extends internationally to collaborations in Canada, Europe, Brazil, and Australia. Dr. Mann has more than 35 years of experience in rehabilitation and community-based programs, spanning research, service, and education, with a focus on applying technology to promote indepen- dence. Dr. Mann’s current work addresses the needs of veterans who have disabilities, the application of home monitoring and communication tech-

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208 GULF WAR AND HEALTH nologies (telehealth and telerehabilitation), and tools for driver assessment and rehabilitation. Linda J. Noble-Haeusslein, PhD, is a professor in the Department of Neuro- logical Surgery and the Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science of the University of California, San Francisco, holds the Alvera L. Kan Endowed Chair of Neurological Surgery, and is codirector and princi- pal investigator of the Brain and Spinal Injury Center and codirector of the Neurobehavioral Core for Rehabilitation Research. Dr. Noble’s research focuses on the neurobiology of traumatic injury to the central nervous system. In particular, her research uses experimental models of traumatic brain and spinal cord injury in the rodent to study the early events that con- tribute to cell injury and impair functional recovery. Her studies are funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Department of Defense. Dr. Noble received her BS from the University of Utah and her PhD from the University of California, Los Angeles. Dr. Noble is a member of numerous professional societies, including the Society for Neuroscience, the American Association of Anatomists, and the Society for Neurotrauma. She is on the editorial board of the Journal of Neurotrauma and the International Jour- nal of Neuroprotection and Neuroregeneration. She has served on a previ- ous Institute of Medicine committee that examined long-term outcomes of traumatic brain injury. Edmond L. Paquette, MD, FACS, is a practicing urologist at Northern Vir- ginia Urology PLLC, Fairfax, Virginia, and assistant professor of surgery at Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Inova Fairfax Campus, and assistant professor of surgery at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. He is a graduate of the University of Rhode Island and the Brown University School of Medicine. Dr. Paquette completed his general surgery internship at Madigan Army Medical Cen- ter in Ft. Lewis, Washington, and his urology residency at Walter Reed Army Medical Center. He served as the chief of the Urology Service at Womack Army Medical Center at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, until his honorable discharge from the US Army in June 2007. During his 13-year military career, Dr. Paquette also served in Germany, Bosnia, and Iraq. His research interests range from genitourinary war trauma to prostate cancer epidemiology. He has won numerous military awards, including the Iraqi Campaign Medal, Meritorious Service Medal, three Army Commenda- tion Medals, Army Achievement Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Global War on Terror Service Medal, Armed Forces Service Medal, Army Service Ribbon, Overseas Ribbon, and NATO Medal. He is a diplomate of the American Board of Urology and a fellow of the American College

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APPENDIX 209 of Surgeons. Additional professional memberships include the American Urological Association, the Society of Government Service Urologists, and the Society of Urologic Oncology. Alan L. Peterson, PhD, ABPP, is a board-certified clinical health psycholo- gist, professor, and chief of the Division of Behavioral Medicine in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. He also serves as the Deputy Chair for Military Collabo- rations and the director of the STRONG STAR Multidisciplinary PTSD Research Consortium. He completed a PhD in clinical psychology at Nova Southeastern University under the tutelage of Dr. Nathan Azrin, one of the founding fathers of behavior therapy. He completed a clinical psychol- ogy residency (internship) and postdoctoral fellowship in clinical health psychology at Wilford Hall Medical Center (WHMC). Dr. Peterson retired from the US Air Force in 2005 after 21 years of active duty service, includ- ing service as the chair of the Department of Psychology and the director of the Clinical Health Psychology Postdoctoral Fellowship Program at WHMC. While on active duty, he deployed in support of Operation Noble Eagle, Operation Enduring Freedom, and Operation Iraqi Freedom. Dr. Peterson has clinical and research experience in the areas of behavioral medicine, clinical health psychology, and combat-related stress disorders. He has conducted research in the areas of posttraumatic stress disorder, psychological risk, and resiliency, Tourette Syndrome, tobacco cessation, pain management, insomnia, weight management, and managing suicidal behaviors. Karol E. Watson, MD, PhD, FACC, is a full-time cardiologist at the Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). She is board certified in the fields of internal medicine and cardiology. Dr. Watson received her undergraduate degree from Stanford University, her medical degree from Harvard Medical School (magna cum laude), and her PhD in physiology from UCLA. She completed a residency in internal medi- cine and a fellowship in cardiology at UCLA, and continued there as part of the Specialty Training and Academic Research program and as Chief Fellow in Cardiovascular Diseases. Dr. Watson is director of the Women’s Cardio- vascular Center at UCLA, co-director of the UCLA Program in Preventative Cardiology, and director for the Center for Cholesterol and Hypertension Management. She is an associate professor of medicine in UCLA’s Division of Cardiology and director of the UCLA Fellowship Program in Cardio- vascular Diseases. She is a principal investigator for several large National Institutes of Health (NIH) studies, and serves on NIH Data, Safety, and Monitoring Boards and Steering Committees. She also currently serves

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210 GULF WAR AND HEALTH as chairperson of the Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Toxicology Devices Panel of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA); she serves as a member of the National Cholesterol Education Program, a group responsible for updating the country’s cholesterol management guidelines; she is a former vice president for the Association of Black Cardiologists; and is current chairperson of the Scientific Advisory Board for Womenheart, the national organization for women living with heart disease. The American Society of Hypertension recognizes Dr. Watson as a specialist in hypertension, she chairs the Cholesterol Committee of the Association of Black Cardiologists and serves on several NIH committees and panels, and is chair of the FDA Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Toxicology Devices Panel.