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Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters

MEMBERS OF THE STEERING COMMITTEE

Linda Gage (Co-Chair) retired in July 2012 as senior demographer in the State of California’s Demographic Research Unit in the Department of Finance. In that capacity, her primary objective was to improve the currency, completeness, and accuracy of official state and federal demographic data that portray the people of California. She was actively involved in producing and evaluating intercensal population estimates for California and assessing data from the American Community Survey, and represented the state’s demographic program and interests in federal and professional forums and evaluation of the effect of various demographic and statistical programs on the state. Previously chair of the steering committee of the Census Bureau’s Federal-State Cooperative Program for Population Estimates, she remains active in professional associations. She serves on the Population Association of America (PAA) Public Affairs Committee and Committee on Population Statistics, and represents PAA on the Census Advisory Committee of Professional Associations. She served as the Governor’s Liaison for Census 2000 and represented the State Data Center network and the Population Association of America on the U.S. Secretary of Commerce’s Decennial Census Advisory Committee. At the National Research Council, she served on the Panel on the Design of the 2010 Census Program of Evaluations and Experiments. She has B.A. and M.A. degrees in



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–B– Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Presenters MEMBERS OF THE STEERING COMMITTEE Linda Gage (Co-Chair) retired in July 2012 as senior demographer in the State of California’s Demographic Research Unit in the Department of Finance. In that capacity, her primary objective was to improve the currency, complete- ness, and accuracy of official state and federal demographic data that portray the people of California. She was actively involved in producing and evalu- ating intercensal population estimates for California and assessing data from the American Community Survey, and represented the state’s demographic program and interests in federal and professional forums and evaluation of the effect of various demographic and statistical programs on the state. Previously chair of the steering committee of the Census Bureau’s Federal-State Coop- erative Program for Population Estimates, she remains active in professional associations. She serves on the Population Association of America (PAA) Pub- lic Affairs Committee and Committee on Population Statistics, and represents PAA on the Census Advisory Committee of Professional Associations. She served as the Governor’s Liaison for Census 2000 and represented the State Data Center network and the Population Association of America on the U.S. Secre- tary of Commerce’s Decennial Census Advisory Committee. At the National Research Council, she served on the Panel on the Design of the 2010 Census Program of Evaluations and Experiments. She has B.A. and M.A. degrees in 179

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180 BENEFITS, BURDENS, AND PROSPECTS OF THE AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY sociology, with emphasis in demography, from the University of California, Davis. Ken Hodges (Co-Chair) is chief demographer at Nielsen. His responsibilities include methodology and evaluation for domestic small-area demographic es- timates, the incorporation of U.S. census (including American Community Survey) data in the company’s information products, and universe estimates standards for the company’s global operations. He is active in the field of ap- plied demography, having served on the 2010 Census Advisory Committee, the Population Association of America’s Committee on Population Statistics, and the boards of the Association of Public Data Users and Council of Professional Associations on Federal Statistics. Prior to joining Claritas (now Nielsen) in 1993, he was director of demography at Donnelley Marketing Information Services. He has a Ph.D. in sociology/demography from Cornell University. Linda Jacobsen is vice president of domestic programs at the Population Refer- ence Bureau (PRB). She directs research projects, develops strategy and tools for disseminating population data and research, and writes PRB reports and web articles. She has extensive research experience with the American Community Survey and decennial census, and served for 6 years on the Census Advisory Committee of Professional Associations. Before joining PRB, she was a se- nior executive and chief demographer for two leading marketing information companies; research director for American Demographics magazine; and faculty member at Cornell University and the University of Iowa. She is chair of the Government and Public Affairs Committee of the Population Association of America, and a member of the board of directors of the Council of Professional Associations on Federal Statistics. For the Census Bureau, she coauthored two handbooks (targeted at general data users and high school teachers, respectively) in the Bureau’s “Compass” series. She holds a doctorate in sociology from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Patrick Jankowski is vice president of research in the Support Services Division of the Greater Houston Partnership (formerly the Houston Chamber of Com- merce), a metropolitan planning organization that works to enhance business activity, economic development, and quality of life in the Houston region. He oversees the Partnership’s research department, which supports information gathering, data analysis, economic forecasting, and mapping for the Partner- ship’s operating divisions. Prior to joining the Partnership in 1981, he was a business writer, editor, researcher, and economic analyst. He is a member of the Texas Economic and Demographic Association, the Council for Community and Economic Research, the National Association for Business Economics, and the Commercial Real Estate Research Forum. He has a bachelor’s degree in economics from the University of Texas at Austin.

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APPENDIX B 181 Joan Naymark retired in March 2012 as director of market analytics and plan- ning at Target Corporation. Prior to joining Target Corporation in 1982, she held research positions at the Minnesota State Demographer’s Office and the Upper Midwest Council. She has testified before Congress on business uses of census and American Community Survey data and represented the U.S. Chamber of Commerce on the Census Bureau’s Census Advisory Committee. She is currently a member of the board of directors of the Association of Public Data Users and chair of the North American Research Task Force of the In- ternational Council of Shopping Centers. She coauthored (with Ken Hodges) articles on the use of census data in the private sector in the first and second editions of the Encyclopedia of the U.S. Census. She holds B.S. and M.A. degrees in sociology and demography from Western Washington University. Richard Rathge is professor of sociology in the Departments of Sociology and Anthropology and Agribusiness and Applied Economics at North Dakota State University (NDSU). For 30 years, from 1981 through 2011, he served as director of the North Dakota State Data Center; in 2012, the State Data Center functions will transition from NDSU to a new North Dakota Census Office within the state commerce department. As director of the State Data Cen- ter and state demographer, he served as North Dakota’s representative to the Federal-State Cooperative Programs for Population Estimates and Population Projections. He has also served as policy analyst for the North Dakota Kids Count program, a research center that monitors the health and well-being of children. He holds B.A. and M.A. degrees from New Mexico State University and a Ph.D. from Michigan State University. WORKSHOP PRESENTERS AND DISCUSSION LEADERS Andrew Beveridge is president and CEO of Social Explorer, Inc., in Bronxville, New York, and professor of sociology at Queens College and the Graduate School and University Center of the City University of New York. Since 1993, he has been a consultant on census data to The New York Times, and specializes in using geographic information systems techniques to analyze demographic data. He has previously taught in the sociology department at Columbia University. He holds a B.A. in economics and M.Phil. and Ph.D. degrees in sociology, all from Yale University. Susan Brower became Minnesota’s State Demographer in February 2012. Prior to that, she worked as a demographic researcher in nonprofit and aca- demic settings. She has a master’s degree in public policy from the University

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182 BENEFITS, BURDENS, AND PROSPECTS OF THE AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY of Minnesota and is completing a Ph.D. in sociology-demography at the Uni- versity of Michigan. Warren Brown is senior research associate at the Cornell Institute for Social and Economic Research at Cornell University. He returned to Cornell (where he previously directed the Program on Applied Demographics) after serving as public service associate and director of the applied demography program at the Carl Vinson Institute of Government at the University of Georgia. Accordingly, he has been responsible for producing population estimates and projections for both New York and Georgia. A member of the Population As- sociation of America’s Committee on Population Statistics and Committee on Applied Demography, he currently serves on the National Research Council’s Panel to Review the 2010 Census. He received a B.A. in religious studies from the University of Virginia, an M.A. in sociology from the New School for So- cial Research, and a Ph.D. in development sociology from Cornell University. Jacqueline Byers retired in fall 2012 as director of research and outreach at the National Association of Counties (NACo), a post she held since October 1996. Prior to joining NACo, she directed the research center at the Georgia Depart- ment of Community Affairs. She has been a member of the Decennial Census Advisory Committee since 1996 and is a member of the District of Columbia Bar. She has a B.A. from Bloomfield College, Bloomfield, New Jersey, and a J.D. from Catholic University, Columbus School of Law. Kathleen Thiede Call is a professor in the University of Minnesota’s School of Public Health, Division of Health Policy and Management. She is an investiga- tor at the State Health Access Data Assistance Center (SHADAC), funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, which assists other states in monitoring rates of coverage and using data to inform policy and improve access. She created a survey of health insurance coverage for use by states and has developed a stream of research concerning the complexities of measuring and estimating rates of insurance coverage. Her research interests include disparities in access to health care and health insurance as well as developing community-driven solutions to health care barriers. Ronald Campbell is a staff writer at The Orange County Register in Southern California. His multipart series on immigrants and the California economy— which he describes in a case study in this agenda book—was recognized in April 2011 with a “Best in Business” award from the Society of American Business Editors and Writers. Matthew Christenson is a senior research analyst at Acxiom Corporation in Little Rock, Arkansas. As Acxiom’s resident expert on census data, he is

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APPENDIX B 183 responsible for building and supporting U.S. and international census data products and services. He also consults with clients and internal stakeholders on appropriate use of geospatial data. Prior to joining Acxiom in 2006, he was a statistician-demographer in the Population Division of the U.S. Census Bureau for more than 8 years. He holds his M.A./Ph.D. in sociology from the Ohio State University and a B.A. in communications from Concordia College, Moorhead, Minnesota. Andrew Conrad is senior program manager for the Institute for Decision Making and the special projects manager for the Business and Community Services Division at The University of Northern Iowa. His responsibilities include the design, delivery, and follow-up of community and economic devel- opment services to communities and regions. A Certified Economic Developer, Drew currently serves on the Council for Community and Economic Research (C2ER) Board of Directors and the Iowa Workforce Development Board. He is a graduate of the Economic Development Institute (EDI) at the University of Oklahoma, and holds a B.A. in American history/pre-law and a master’s in public policy. David Crowe is chief economist and senior vice president at the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB). He is responsible for NAHB’s forecast of housing and economic trends, survey research, and analysis of the home building industry and consumer preferences, as well as microeconomic analysis of government policies that affect housing. Kenneth Darga has served as state demographer for Michigan since 2000. He is a member of the Steering Committee of the Federal-State Cooperative for Population Estimates and is the author of two books on the census. Haya El Nasser has been with USA TODAY for 28 years, first as a business reporter and later as the newspaper’s Los Angeles news correspondent. She began covering demographics and the census in 1996 and has reported on the lead-up to the 2000 census and the 2010 census and data findings from both. She has also covered the introduction of the American Community Survey and has mined the data for stories. She is responsible for wading through all Census data and identifying national trends, both on deadline and for enterprise stories. She tries to incorporate demographic data in everything she covers, including planning and development issues which have become part of her beat. Ronald Fecso retired as chief statistician at the U.S. Government Accountabil- ity Office (GAO) shortly after the workshop, having held that position since 2006. Prior to GAO, he served as chief statistician in the Division of Science Resources Statistics at the National Science Foundation (now the National

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184 BENEFITS, BURDENS, AND PROSPECTS OF THE AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY Center for Science and Engineering Statistics) and the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. He has a B.A. in mathematics from Rider College and an M.A. in mathematical statistics from the University of Rochester. Ford Fessenden is a graphics editor at The New York Times. He has been a reporter on the metropolitan desk and the investigations desk, specializing in exploiting databases and computer tools for news stories, including a study of rampage killers, and the re-creation of the last 102 minutes of the World Trade Center. He ran the Florida ballot project for a consortium of the New York Times, Washington Post, and Wall Street Journal in 2001, cataloguing the ballots that went uncounted after the Supreme Court stopped the recount. He has worked for Newsday and other newspapers. Katie Genadek is a research assistant on the Integrated Public Use Microdata Series (IPUMS) user support core at the Minnesota Population Center, Uni- versity of Minnesota. She has been an IPUMS user since 2003 and has worked on the IPUMS projects since 2007. She currently directs IPUMS outreach and dissemination efforts and she gives IPUMS trainings at conferences, universi- ties, and policy institutes. She is finishing a Ph.D. in applied economics at the University of Minnesota; she holds an M.S. in applied economics and a B.S. in economics from Montana State University. Linda Giannarelli is a senior fellow in the Income and Benefits Policy Center of the Urban Institute. She serves as project director for the maintenance and development of the TRIM3 microsimulation model, and conducts research in the areas of poverty, child care, and low-income benefit programs. In recent years, she has co-led efforts applying the TRIM3 model to ACS data to estimate the impact of state policy choices on poverty. Jeanne Gobalet has been an applied demographer for many years. Since 1992, she has been a principal of Lapkoff & Gobalet Demographic Research, Inc., located in California. Much of her recent work utilizes geographic information systems techniques and ACS data. She has served as an expert witness in cases involving political redistricting, racially polarized voting, environmental jus- tice, jury selection, and discrimination in housing, employment, and mortgage lending. Her consulting practice includes helping clients meet federal and Cali- fornia Voting Rights Act requirements. She earned four degrees from Stanford University, including a Ph.D. in sociology, and was a postdoctoral fellow in demography at the University of California, Berkeley. Cheryl Hayes is the senior manager of the Exposures team in the Research and Modeling Group at AIR Worldwide. She is responsible for leading the

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APPENDIX B 185 team in the development of comprehensive, high-resolution industry exposure databases for more than 90 countries worldwide. Beth Jarosz is senior demographer at the San Diego Association of Govern- ments (SANDAG) and has more than a decade of experience in demographic estimation, forecasting, and analysis. At SANDAG, she manages the annual population estimates and long-range forecast programs, and she has worked on a variety of topics ranging from transportation planning to public health. She also teaches sociology at Pensacola State College. She holds a B.S. in applied economics from the University of Rhode Island and an M.A. in demographic and social analysis from the University of California, Irvine. Gad Levanon is director of macroeconomic research at The Conference Board, where he also leads the labor markets program. He created The Conference Board Employment Trends Index™ , a widely used measure that fills the need for a leading index of employment. His research focuses on compensation growth, retirement trends, labor shortages, labor productivity, and future trends in employment and unemployment. Levanon received his Ph.D. in economics from Princeton University, and he holds undergraduate and master’s degrees from Tel Aviv University in Israel. Terri Ann Lowenthal, a former staff director of the House Subcommittee on Census and Population, advises nonprofits, foundations, and the business sector on issues related to the census and federal statistics generally. She is a co-director of The Census Project, a non-partisan coalition of census and ACS stakeholders; consultant to the Funders Census Initiative, a collaborative of foundations interested in an accurate and comprehensive census and ACS, and writes The Census Project Blog. Steve H. Murdock is the Allyn R. and Gladys M. Cline Professor of Sociology and director of the Hobby Center for the Study of Texas at Rice University. He served as director of the U.S. Census Bureau from December 2007 until the change of administrations in January 2009. The first official state demographer of Texas, he previously held faculty appointments at the University of Texas at San Antonio and Texas A&M University. Kathleen Miller joined the Rural Policy Research Institute (RUPRI) at the University of Missouri in January 2000 as program director. Miller is responsi- ble for the coordination of the RUPRI program of work, which encompasses researchers and practitioners across the country analyzing the rural impacts of public policies and programs in health care, human services, entrepreneurship, and regional and community development. Her research interests include un- derstanding how the definitions of rural geographies impact policy outcomes,

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186 BENEFITS, BURDENS, AND PROSPECTS OF THE AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY and she has published several RUPRI policy briefs on this topic. She received an M.S. in agricultural economics from Penn State University, where she also received her B.S. in agricultural economics and rural sociology. Russ Paulsen is executive director for community preparedness and resilience at the national headquarters of the American Red Cross in Washington, in which capacity he leads Red Cross efforts to build public preparedness for disasters at the neighborhood level. Prior to his current position, he directed the Red Cross hurricane recovery unit and led the organization’s long-term recovery efforts after Hurricane Katrina. Allison Plyer is deputy director of the Greater New Orleans Community Data Center. She is co-author of The New Orleans Index series, developed in collaboration with the Brookings Institution to analyze the state of the New Orleans recovery. She is recognized as an international expert in post-Katrina demographics and New Orleans recovery trends. Steven Romalewski directs the CUNY Mapping Service at the Graduate Cen- ter of the City University of New York. For the past 20 years he has leveraged geographic information system (GIS) tools and concepts to help organizations in diverse fields understand and act on the spatial dimensions of their work. Since 2006 he has also taught GIS to graduate planning students at Pratt Insti- tute. Joseph Salvo is director of the Population Division at the New York City Department of City Planning. He is the former president of the Association of Public Data Users and a member of the Population Association of America’s Committee on Population Statistics, and is active in research on the evalua- tion and use of American Community Survey data and on the demography of immigration in the New York area. He has served on several National Research Council panels related to the census and the ACS, including a recently completed Panel on Statistical Methods for Measuring the Group Quarters Population in the ACS. A fellow of the American Statistical Association, he holds M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in sociology from Fordham University. Vincent L. Sanders is a lead transportation systems planner for the Metropoli- tan Transit Authority of Harris County, Texas (METRO). He joined METRO’s Service Design & Development/Travel Demand Forecasting & Analysis Di- vision in 1998. He is primarily responsible for managing patronage forecasts, and also manages the socioeconomic and travel databases that generate reports on trip patterns, demographic profiles, and ridership estimates for proposed transit service and regional options and facilities. He has worked with other agencies to help coordinate joint development and commerce studies relative to

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APPENDIX B 187 employment concentrations and worker travel patterns, and serves on several interagency committees. Prior to joining METRO, he worked as a trans- portation consultant with RSM Services. Sanders earned a B.S. in business administration from Wayne State University and an M.S. in transportation planning and management from Texas Southern University. James Stark is an epidemiologist for the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. He works in the Bureau of Epidemiology Services and provides methodological consultation to programs throughout the agency. In addition, he collaborates with the Built Environment and Health group at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health. Barry Steinhardt is founder of Friends of Privacy USA and a senior advisor and trustee of Privacy International. He founded Friends of Privacy USA after retiring in 2009 following nearly 30 years with the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), including service as associate director of the ACLU and di- rector of ACLU’s Program on Technology and Liberty. He has also served as president of the Electronic Frontier Foundation. During his time with the ACLU, he was a member of the Decennial Census Advisory Committee. He is currently a member of the Data Privacy and Integrity Committee of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Amy Terpstra is the associate director of the Social IMPACT Research Center at Heartland Alliance. Her work focuses on researching and disseminating knowledge on poverty and income-related issues. She holds a master’s degree in social work from the Jane Addams College of Social Work at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Richard K. Thomas is a Memphis-based health care consultant with more than 40 years experience in health services research, planning, and development. He provides consultation to hospitals, health systems, clinics and other health care organizations. He is on the faculties of the University of Mississippi and the University of Tennessee Health Science Center and has authored numerous publications on health care and demographics. Stephen Tordella, president of Decision Demographics, Inc., in Arlington, Virginia, is an applied demographer with more than 35 years of public- and private-sector consulting experience. He was a state-level demographer for 10 years, and then worked in the commercial demographics industry for 3 years. Since 1987 he has run a small consulting business. He holds an M.A. in demog- raphy from Brown University.

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188 BENEFITS, BURDENS, AND PROSPECTS OF THE AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY Lester Tsosie has been working for the Navajo Nation Division of Economic Development as a demographer. He has used U.S. Census and ACS data and information to create data products for Navajo Nation leaders, local elected leaders, practitioners, and residents of local Navajo chapters.