people said that they had experienced discrimination or received substandard care. Nearly 8 percent of lesbian, gay, or bisexual people and almost 27 percent of transgender people reported being refused needed health care. More than 10 percent of lesbian, gay, or bisexual people and more than 15 percent of transgender people reported having had the experience of a health care professional who refused to touch them or used excessive precautions before touching them. Almost 11 percent of lesbian, gay, or bisexual people and almost 21 percent of transgender people said that they had experienced a health care professional use harsh or abusive language with them and 4 percent of lesbian, gay, or bisexual people and almost 8 percent of transgender people described receiving physically rough or abusive treatment from a health care professional. In nearly every case, people of color and low-income people had higher rates of experiencing discrimination.

In terms of barriers to care, the survey found that significant percentages of LGBT individuals expressed concerns about accessing health care. Nine percent of lesbian, gay, or bisexual people and almost 52 percent of transgender people feared they would be refused medical service; more than 28 percent of lesbian, gay, or bisexual people and 73 percent of transgender people expressed concern that medical personnel would treat them differently than non-LGBT people; 49 percent of lesbian, gay, or bisexual people and almost 90 percent of transgender people said there were not enough health professionals who were adequately trained to care for them because of their sexual orientation or gender identity status; more than 24 percent lesbian, gay, or bisexual people and more than 50 percent of transgender people said there were not enough support groups; and almost 29 percent of lesbian, gay, or bisexual people and almost 59 percent of transgender people said there were not enough substance abuse programs for LGBT individuals. Again, the numbers were all higher in people of color.

As part of this project, Lambda Legal and its partners also collected 50 personal stories that provided real-life illustrations of the discrimination and substandard care LGBT people experience. Among the stories that Tillery recounted were

• Jodi from Atlanta, who had to seek emergency room care. “The nurse comes into the room to get my information. Among her list of questions was whether I was single or married. Well, I had a union that was not recognized in Georgia, but it would not have been accurate to answer either single or married. The nurse wanted an emergency contact and wanted to know if there was anyone with me, and if so, what was their relationship to me. I panicked for a minute.

“I was scared to admit my life partner was in the waiting room. I was mortified to say I was single. My head was swimming trying to think of a lie about who my partner was. Should I be safe and say she was a friend? If so, she would be denied visitation if something went wrong. Should I lie and say she was my sister?



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