includes a significant effort in the development of new design tools for the modeling and simulation of these systems. Dr. Chiarulli holds patents in computer and related optical and optoelectronic hardware. His current research work is in the areas of chip-level optoelectronic interconnections, optical-electronic-mechanical multidomain computer-aided design, optical memory systems, robotics, and voice input/speech output interfaces for embedded system applications. He received his Ph.D. in computer science from Louisiana State University.

DAVID E. CROW, NAE, is retired senior vice president of engineering at Pratt and Whitney Aircraft Engine Company. He is currently a professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Connecticut. At Pratt and Whitney he was influential in design, development, testing, and manufacturing in support of a full line of engines for aerospace and industrial applications. Dr. Crow was involved with products that include high-thrust turbofans for large commercial and military aircraft, turboprops and small turbofans for regional and corporate aircraft and helicopters, booster engines and upper-stage propulsion systems for advanced launch vehicles, turbopumps for the space shuttle, and industrial engines for land-based power generation. His involvement included sophisticated computer modeling and standards work to bring constant improvements in the performance and reliability of the company’s products while at the same time reducing noise and emissions.

MARJORIE ERICKSON is an expert both in the development of physics-based models of material behavior in the prediction of material failure and in the performance of risk assessments. Dr. Erickson is the president of Phoenix Engineering Associates, Inc., and she is an adjunct professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Maryland. She conducts research and consults with industry regarding fracture safety assessment methodology for steel and other alloy components. She provides these services in the areas of assessing the integrity and durability of civil, mechanical, and marine structures fabricated from metallic materials. Specific work that Dr. Erickson has performed includes developing and using integrated, predictive models of material behavior to assess the current status and predict the remaining safe life, under known or expected operating and accident-event conditions, for nuclear pressure vessels and other alloy applications, including fracture safety assessment and life extension of aging aircraft and pipelines. Dr. Erickson received her Ph.D. in materials science from the University of Virginia.

DEBASIS MITRA, NAE, is vice president in the Chief Scientist’s Office of Bell Labs, Alcatel-Lucent. He is responsible for global research partnerships and academic relations. From 1999 to 2007 as vice president of the Mathematical and Algorithmic Sciences Research Center, he directed activities in fundamental mathematics, algorithms, complex systems analysis and optimization, statistics, learning theory, information and communications sciences, and industrial mathematics. He is a Bell Labs Fellow and a Life Fellow of the IEEE. He has been McKay Professor at the University of California, Berkeley, and the Albert Winsemius Professor at the Nanyang Technical University in Singapore.

R. BYRON PIPES, NAE, is the John L. Bray Distinguished Professor of Engineering at Purdue University. He is a member of the Royal Society of Engineering Sciences of Sweden (1995). Composite materials have been the focus of his scholarship for the past 28 years. He has developed analytical models and carried out experiments with the objective of developing a fundamental understanding of the design, durability, and manufacturing of these materials systems and structures. He served as Goodyear Endowed Professor of Polymer Engineering at the University of Akron during 2001-2004. He was Distinguished Visiting Scholar at the College of William and Mary during 1999-2001, where he pursued research at the NASA Langley Research Center in the field of carbon nanotechnology. He



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