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Specific Examples of NNI Stakeholders

The breadth of NNI stakeholders can be seen from the participants in the Strategic Planning Stakeholder Workshop held July 13-14, 2010. The goal of the NNI-sponsored workshop was “to obtain input from stakeholders, both those new to nanoscale science, engineering, and technology and those already familiar with these fields and with the NNI.…” The diversity of the workshop participants (Table C.1) is indicative of the many actors involved in translating research to technology development and commercial applications and in creating a highly capable workforce, as well as the impact of scientific research on U.S. society at large.



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C Specific Examples of NNI Stakeholders The breadth of NNI stakeholders can be seen from the participants in the Strategic Planning Stakeholder Workshop held July 13-14, 2010. The goal of the NNI-sponsored workshop was “to obtain input from stakeholders, both those new to nanoscale science, engineering, and technology and those already familiar with these fields and with the NNI. . . .” The diversity of the workshop participants (Table C.1) is indicative of the many actors involved in translating research to technology development and commercial applications and in creating a highly ca- pable workforce, as well as the impact of scientific research on U.S. society at large. 125

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126 Triennial Review of the N at i o n a l N a n o t e c h n o l o g y I n i t i at i v e TABLE C.1  NNI Stakeholders NNI Stakeholder Organization Federal departments, Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human agencies, laboratories, Services, and Labor; Consumer Product Safety Commission, FDA, EPA, OSHA, NIOSH, and offices NIST, National Institutes of Health (NHGRI, NIEHS, NIMH, MIEHA, NCMRR), Defense Threat Reduction Agency, National Science Foundation, U.S. Forest Service, National Reconnaissance Office, International Trade Administration/Commerce, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research/Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Federal laboratories and centers (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center, Sandia National Laboratories, Army Research Laboratory, NASA Glenn Research Center, USACE Engineer Research and Development Center, Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory (NIH/FDA/NIST), FDA Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Idaho National Laboratory), National Academy of Sciences, OSTP, NNCO Congress Representative Daniel Lipinski, Offices of Representative Lipinski, Senator Mark Pryor Nonprofits CNA Labor AFL-CIO Policy centers Center for Policy on Emerging Technologies, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Children’s Environmental Health Network, International Federal Technology Watch, Science and Technology Policy Institute, Institute for Advanced Sciences Convergence, Intellegere Foundation Universities Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory; University of California, Berkeley; Purdue University; Norwich University Applied Research Institute; Oklahoma State University; University of Virginia; University of Northeastern; University of Rochester; Pennsylvania State University; Arizona State University; Rice University; Harvard University; University of Southern California; California Institute of Technology Research foundations International Life Sciences Institute, Norwich Park Research Institutes (U.K.) Nano institutes, Network for Computation Nanotechnology, NanoBusiness Alliance, NanoScience networking and trade Exchange, Rushford Institute for Nanotechnology, Nano-Link Regional Center, Oklahoma associations Nanotechnology Initiative, NanoStar Institute, PA Bio Nano Systems, LLC Traditional trade American Chemistry Council, Association of Science-Technology Centers, AAAS, Council associations for Chemistry Research, American National Standards Institute, American Forest and Paper Association, Nano Association of Natural Resources and Energy Security, Council for Chemical Research News organization Inside Washington Publishers Commercial Pixelligent Technologies, Lockheed Martin, Evonik Degussa Corp., NanoTox, Applied Nanostructured Solutions, Luna Innovations Inc., Rushford NanoElectroChemistry Co., Eikos, Inc., Zyvex, Intel, System Planning Corp., General Dynamics AIST, Science Applications International Corporation, Notable Solutions, Inc., PSI, Inc., Semiconductor Research Corporation

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A pp e n d i x C 127 TABLE C.1  Continued NNI Stakeholder Organization Technology assessments World Technology Evaluation Center, International Center for Technology Assessment Law firms Arnold & Porter, K&L Gates Other Federal Technology Watch NOTE: This list of workshop participants shows the breadth of NNI stakeholders and not the total number of stakeholders. The workshop listed only the stakeholders attending in person an event that ran at full capacity. Those not able to attend in person, and therefore not on the list, could also access the event via a webcast, and stakeholder input could be provided in writing. For additional information, see National Nanotechnology Initiative, available at http://www.nano.gov/node/256, accessed January 9, 2013. SOURCE: Information from the final report of the Strategic Planning Stakeholder Workshop, July 13-14, 2010.