D

Committee Biographies

CAROL A. HANDWERKER (Co-chair) is the Reinhardt Schuhmann, Jr., Professor of Materials Engineering at Purdue University, having joined Purdue in August 2005 after serving for 9 years as chief of the NIST Metallurgy Division. Handwerker’s research is focused on the thermodynamics and kinetics of interface processes, with applications to microelectronics, nanoelectronics, and printed electronics. She received a B.A. in art history from Wellesley College and an S.B. in materials science and engineering, an S.M. in ceramics, and an Sc.D. degree in ceramics from MIT. Following a year’s postdoctoral research at MIT on electronic packaging, she joined the NBS in 1984 as an NRC-NBS postdoctoral research associate, working on the relationship between stress and diffusion in solids and on composition effects on sintering and grain growth. She became a permanent staff member at NBS in 1986, group leader of the Materials Structure and Characterization Group in 1994, and division chief of the Metallurgy Division in March 1996. She is a fellow of ASM International and of the American Ceramic Society (ACS) and is past chair of the American Ceramic Society’s Basic Science Division. She serves on the Technical Advisory Committee and the Environmental Leadership Steering Committee for iNEM and has served on numerous other boards, including the Board of Trustees of the Gordon Research Conferences, the advisory committees of Carnegie Mellon University’s Mesoscale Interface Mapping Project and of MIT’s Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and the editorial board for the Annual Reviews of Materials Research. She has written more than 100 scientific publications. Her expertise includes materials science and engineering and research management.



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D Committee Biographies CAROL A. HANDWERKER (Co-chair) is the Reinhardt Schuhmann, Jr., Professor of Materials Engineering at Purdue University, having joined Purdue in August 2005 after serving for 9 years as chief of the NIST Metallurgy Division. ­ andwerker’s H research is focused on the thermodynamics and kinetics of interface processes, with applications to microelectronics, nanoelectronics, and printed electronics. She received a B.A. in art history from Wellesley College and an S.B. in materials science and engineering, an S.M. in ceramics, and an Sc.D. degree in ceramics from MIT. Following a year’s postdoctoral research at MIT on electronic packaging, she joined the NBS in 1984 as an NRC-NBS postdoctoral research associate, working on the relationship between stress and diffusion in solids and on composition effects on sintering and grain growth. She became a permanent staff member at NBS in 1986, group leader of the Materials Structure and Characterization Group in 1994, and division chief of the Metallurgy Division in March 1996. She is a fellow of ASM International and of the American Ceramic Society (ACS) and is past chair of the American Ceramic Society’s Basic Science Division. She serves on the Technical Advisory Committee and the Environmental Leadership Steering Committee for iNEM and has served on numerous other boards, including the Board of Trustees of the Gordon Research Conferences, the advisory committees of Carnegie ­Mellon University’s Mesoscale Interface Mapping Project and of MIT’s Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and the editorial board for the Annual Reviews of Materials Research. She has written more than 100 scientific publications. Her expertise includes materials science and engineering and research management. 128

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A pp e n d i x D 129 MICHAEL N. HELMUS (Co-chair) is a consultant who specializes in medical devices, drug delivery, nanotechnology, and tissue engineering. Helmus has more than 28 years’ experience managing the R&D and business development of medical and controlled drug delivery devices. He focuses on developing commercialization strategies of potentially disruptive technology as well as managing intellectual property development (36 issued U.S. patents) and supporting patent litigation. Many of his patents are focused on utilizing nanotechnology to improve the functionality of medical devices. He supports testing and regulatory submissions and performs due diligence evaluations of medical devices, biomedical materials (synthetic and biologic), biodegradable compositions, controlled drug delivery, nanotechnology, medical technology, and tissue engineering. Helmus is an expert in biomaterials, biocompatibility, and biomaterial databases (committee chair, ASM International, Materials for Medical Devices Database). His medical device experience includes drug eluting stents and coatings, large- and small-diameter vascular grafts, mechanical and biologic heart valves, central venous catheters, wound dressings, sealants such as fibrin sealant, and percutaneous connectors. He has presented and written on commercializing nanotechnology. He has a Ph.D. and an M.S. in biomedical engineering from Case Western Reserve University and was a Timken Honors Fellow, and he has a B.S. in metallurgy and materials science from Lehigh University with highest honors, Departmental Honors Phi Beta Kappa, and Tau Beta Pi. His professional activities include adjunct associate professor, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Worcester Polytechnic Institute; fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering; and member of the Science Advisory Board, University of Massachusetts, Boston. His expertise includes research management; technology development; technology insertion; manufacturing processes and management. ROBERT R. DOERING is a senior fellow and research manager at Texas Instruments (TI). He is also a member of TI’s Technical Advisory Board, Kilby Labs Review Board, ­ xternal Development and Manufacturing Leadership Team, and Executive Univer- E sity Research Steering Team. His previous positions at TI include manager of CMOS and DRAM process development, director of the Microelectronics Manufacturing Science and Technology (MMST) Program, director of Scaled-­ echnology Integra- T tion, manager of Future-Factory Strategy, and manager of Technology Strategy. He received a B.S. degree in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1968 and a Ph.D. in physics from Michigan State University in 1974. He joined TI in 1980, after several years on the faculty of the Physics Department at the Univer- sity of Virginia. His physics research was on nuclear reactions and was highlighted by the discovery of the Giant Spin-Isospin Resonance in heavy nuclei in 1973 and by pioneering experiments in medium-energy heavy-ion reactions in the late 1970s. His early work at Texas Instruments was on SRAM, DRAM, and NMOS/CMOS device

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130 Triennial Review of the N at i o n a l N a n o t e c h n o l o g y I n i t i at i v e physics and process-flow design. Management responsibilities during his first 10 years at TI included overall CMOS and DRAM device/process technology development as well as advanced lithography R&D. The teams that he led developed the first process flows integrating silicide-clad, lightly doped-drain, shallow-trench-isolated, CMOS transistors, which were forerunners of all modern submicron CMOS devices. Non- planar (doped-face trench) DRAM bit cells were also developed under his leadership. Doering is an IEEE Fellow and chair of the Semiconductor Manufacturing Technical Committee of the IEEE Electron Devices Society. He is also a fellow of the American Physical Society (APS) and chair of the Corporate Associates Advisory Committee of the American Institute of Physics. In addition, he is chair of the Governing Council of the Nanoelectronics Research Initiative (NRI) consortium. Doering was a mem- ber of the Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA) committee that founded the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) and is one of the two U.S. representatives to the International Roadmap Committee, which currently gov- erns the ITRS. He also served on the SIA committees that founded the Focus ­ enter C ­Research Program (FCRP) and NRI consortia of the Semiconductor Research Corpo- ration (SRC) as well as on the APS committee that founded the Forum on Industrial and Applied Physics (FIAP). He is a former member of the SRC Board of Directors, and, overall, has served on 88 industry/university/government boards, advisory com- mittees, and study groups. He has also authored and/or presented 232 publications and invited papers and talks and has 20 U.S. patents. LEE FLEMING is the faculty director of the Fung Institute for Engineering Leader­ ship in the College of Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. He designs and teaches engineering leadership courses and advises multidisciplinary engineering commercialization projects for masters’ and professional students. Fleming earned his B.S. in electrical engineering from the University of California, Davis. He then spent 7 years at Hewlett Packard Company in research, design, manufacturing, and application engineering. He has published in Hewlett Packard’s ­ technical literature and holds two patents in the area of custom integrated circuit testing. During his time at Hewlett Packard, Fleming earned an M.S. in engineer- ing management from Stanford University in the Honors Cooperative Program. He received his Ph.D. in organizational behavior in the Department of Industrial Engineering at Stanford. He also completed an M.S. in statistics during his doctoral years. Fleming’s research investigates how managers can increase their organiza- tion’s chances of inventing a breakthrough through types of collaboration, the integration of scientific and empirical search strategies, and the recombination of diverse technologies. Fleming’s research has appeared in Management Science, Administrative Science Quarterly, Research Policy, Organization Science, Industrial and Corporate Change, Strategic Management Journal, and the Harvard Business Review, California Management Review, and Sloan Management Review practitioner

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A pp e n d i x D 131 journals. His awards include the best student paper in the Academy of Management technology division, the Richard R. Nelson Prize of 2005 (with Olav Sorenson), the 2007 Accenture Award for the best paper in California Management Review (with Matt Marx), and the 2011 Strategic Management Society Conference Best Paper Award (with Ken Younge and Tony Tong). He won the 2009 Apgar Award at the Harvard Business School for innovation in teaching (with Joe Lassiter and Forest Reinhardt). He is the department editor for the Entrepreneurship and Innovation section of Management Science. Fleming is currently on leave from his position as the Albert J. Weatherhead III Professor of Business Administration at Harvard University. He joined the Harvard Business School faculty in 1998. He designed and teaches the course “Inventing Breakthroughs and Commercializing Science,” which integrates business, science, engineering, and medical students from across the university in multidisciplinary science commercialization projects. He has also taught technology and operations management, managing innovation and product development, building green businesses, executive education courses in innovation and product development and intellectual property, doctoral courses and seminars, research methods and innovation, and a university seminar in ­ pplied statistical a methods. PAUL A. FLEURY (NAE, NAS) is the Frederick William Beinecke Professor of Engineering and Applied Physics and a professor of physics at Yale University. He is the founding director of the Yale Institute for Nanoscience and Quantum Engineer­ng. He served as dean of engineering at Yale from 2000 until January i 2008. Prior to joining Yale, Fleury was dean of the School of Engineering at the University of New Mexico from January 1996 following 30 years at AT&T Bell Laboratories. At Bell Laboratories he was director of three different research divi- sions covering physics, materials, and materials processing research between 1979 and 1996. During 1992 and 1993 he was vice president for research and explor- atory technology at Sandia National Laboratories, where he was responsible for research in physical sciences, high-performance computing, engineering sciences, pulsed power, micro­ lectronics, photonics, materials and process engineering, and e computer networking. Fleury is the author of more than 130 scientific publications on nonlinear ­ ptics, spectroscopy and phase transformations in condensed matter o systems and he has co-edited three books. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science; a member of the ­ ational Academy of Engineering and the National Academy of Sciences; N and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He received the 1985 Michelson-Morley Award and the 1992 Frank Isakson Prize of the American Physical Society for his research on optical phenomena and phase transitions in condensed matter systems. He has been a member of numerous National Research Council study panels, including that of the 2007 National Nanotechnology Initia-

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132 Triennial Review of the N at i o n a l N a n o t e c h n o l o g y I n i t i at i v e tive review (National Research Council, A Matter of Size: Triennial Review of the National Nanotechnology Initiative, The National Academies Press, ­ ashington, W D.C., 2006). He has served on the Secretary of Energy’s Laboratory Operations Board and the University of California President’s Council on the National Labo- ratories. He has also served on review committees for Brookhaven, Lawrence Berkeley, Sandia, and Los Alamos National Laboratories. He is currently active on Sandia and LANL committees in addition to his service on the Visiting Committee for Advanced Technology for the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and the Board on Physics and Astronomy of the National Research Council. He received his B.S. and M.S. in 1960 and 1962 from John Carroll University and his doctorate from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1965, all in physics. LIESL FOLKS has a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Western Australia, and an MBA from Cornell University. She first moved to the United States to join IBM Almaden Research Center in 1997 and later transitioned to Hitachi Global Storage Technologies through a corporate acquisition that was finalized in 2004. Her field of expertise is magnetism and magnetic materials, and her significant technical contributions are in the fields of nanostructured permanent magnetic materials, bit patterned recording media, magnetic force microscopy, spin transfer torque device physics, and semiconductor-based nonmagnetic field sensors. Currently she manages the advanced media technologies development program within Hitachi Global Storage Technologies. She is also president-elect of the IEEE Magnetics So- ciety, and she maintains active collaborative links with academics in relevant fields. ROBERT HULL is the Henry Burlage Professor and head of the Materials Science and Engineering Department at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, which he joined in January 2008. He received a Ph.D. in materials science from Oxford University in 1983. He then spent 10 years at AT&T Laboratories in the Physics Research Division. He next joined the faculty of the Materials Science and Engineering Department at the University of Virginia, where he was the Charles Henderson Professor of Engineering, director of the National Science Foundation Center on Nanoscopic Materials Design, and director of the university’s Institute for Nanoscale and Quantum Engineering, Science, and Technology (NanoQuest). His recent research focuses on the development of new techniques for nanoscale assembly, fabrication, and characterization using focused ion and electron beams, with a particular emphasis on epitaxial semiconductor structures and applications to nanoelectronics. He has published well over 250 journal and conference papers, edited several books and proceedings in the fields of semiconductor materials and devices, given about 100 keynote and invited talks at national and international conferences, and presented more than 100 additional seminars at universities and government and industrial laboratories. He is a member of multiple editorial and

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A pp e n d i x D 133 advisory boards, a fellow of the American Physical Society and of the Materials Research Society, and a member of the European Academy of Sciences, and he has served as president of the Materials Research Society. He has served on multiple national committees, including serving as the chair of a committee of visitors for the Division of Materials Science at NSF. JACQUELINE A. ISAACS is a professor in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering at Northeastern University and an associate director of the NSF Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center for High-rate Nano­manufacturing (CHN)—a collaborative partnership among Northeastern University, the Univer- sity of Massachusetts Lowell, and the University of New Hampshire. She leads the Responsible Manufacturing Research Thrust for the CHN. Isaacs is ­esponsible r for her own research on assessing economic and environmental trade­offs in - nano­ anufacturing, as well as oversight of a team of faculty in political science, m p ­ hilosophy, and worker safety. The goal of this research is to concurrently assess the regulatory, economic, environmental, and ethical issues facing the development of nanomanufacturing processes. Isaacs’ research group works on life-cycle assess- ment of various processes under development and assesses alternatives to uncover more environmentally benign processes or products. Her 1998 NSF Career Award was one of the first that focused on environmentally benign manufacturing. Isaacs also guides research on development and assessment of educational computer games. She received a B.S. from Carnegie Mellon University and S.M and Sc.D. degrees in materials science and engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She has been recognized by Northeastern University, receiving the President’s Aspiration Award in 2005 and a University-wide Excellence in Teach- ing Award in 2000. Her expertise includes nanotechnology, materials science and engineering, manufacturing processes, and management. DONALD H. LEVY, the Albert A. Michelson Distinguished Service Professor in Chemistry, is the University of Chicago’s vice president for research and for ­national laboratories; CEO of UChicago Argonne, LLC; vice-chairman of the Board of Governors for Argonne; and a member of the Board of Directors for Fermilab. Named to the university position in 2007, Levy has oversight responsibilities for the management contracts for both Argonne National Laboratory and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the Office of Technology and Intellectual Policy, the ­Office of University Research Administration, University-Argonne Research Centers, and all issues related to human subjects research. The annual research budget of the university is more than $400 million. The combined annual research budget for Argonne and Fermilab is $900 million. In addition to his responsibilities for re- search across the university and Argonne campuses, Levy chairs the Science Policy Council, a collaboration with Argonne, Northwestern University, and the Univer-

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134 Triennial Review of the N at i o n a l N a n o t e c h n o l o g y I n i t i at i v e sity of Illinois, established in 2005 to enhance Argonne’s scientific capabilities, to strengthen the state’s technological base and workforce preparation, and to improve Illinois’ ability to compete for federal research funding. Levy joined the University of Chicago faculty in 1967. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Physi- cal Society, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is a former chairman of the Chemistry Department, and he played an important lead- ership role in planning the new Gordon Center for Integrative Science. A physical chemist, Levy was a leader in developing and using supersonic jet cooling to study the structure of molecules. Levy was editor of the Journal of Chemical Physics from 1998 to 2008. His awards include the E. Bright Wilson Award in Spectroscopy and the Ellis Lippincott Award from the Optical Society of America. CELIA MERZBACHER is the vice president for Innovative Partnerships at the Semiconductor Research Corporation (SRC). She is primarily responsible for devel­ p­ng novel partnerships with stakeholders in government and the private o i sector in support of SRC’s research and education goals. Prior to joining SRC, Merzbacher was assistant director for technology R&D in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), where she coordinated and advised on a range of issues, including nanotechnology, technology transfer, technical standards, and intellectual property. At OSTP she oversaw the National Nanotechnology Ini- tiative, the multiagency federal program for nanotechnology research and develop- ment. She also served as executive director of the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology, which is composed of leaders from academia, industry, and other research organizations and advises the President on technology, scientific research priorities, and math and science education. Previously, Merzbacher was on the staff of the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) in Washington, D.C. As a research scientist at NRL, she developed advanced optical materials, for which she received a number of patents. She also worked in the NRL Technology Transfer Office, where she was responsible for managing NRL intellectual property. Merzbacher served on the Board of Directors of the American National Standards Institute and led the U.S. delegation to the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development Working Party on Nanotechnology. She received her B.S. in geology from Brown University and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in geochemistry and mineralogy from Pennsylvania State University. Her expertise includes nanotechnology, research management, and technology transfer/commercialization. OMKARAM (OM) NALAMASU is the chief technology officer (CTO) for Applied Materials, Inc. In this role, he reports to chairman and CEO Mike Splinter and pro- vides critical technological insight to maintain Applied’s technology leadership in the industries it serves. Nalamasu leads the company’s R&D and innovation strate-

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A pp e n d i x D 135 gies, funding of global academia and consortia, and venture capital investments into start-ups, as well as value-added strategic partnerships with academia, research institutes, customers, supply chain partners, and government funding agencies. He previously was vice president of research and a NYSTAR (New York State Founda- tion for Science, Technology and Innovation) distinguished professor of materials science and engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). At RPI, he con- ceived and founded the Center for Computational Nanotechnology Innovations (CCNI), a $100 million program that created the world’s fastest university-based computing center at RPI in partnership with the state of New York and IBM. He was also the founding director of the $20 million Center for Future Energy Systems that was created to help meet 25 percent of New York state’s energy needs from renewable sources by the year 2012. Prior to joining RPI in 2002, Nalamasu was the CTO of the New Jersey Nanotechnology Consortium, the nation’s first public/ private nonprofit enterprise to foster precompetitive nanotechnology research with Bell Labs, New Jersey, and other academic and industrial partners. From 1986 to 2002, he held key R&D leadership positions at AT&T Bell Laboratories, Bell Labora- tories/Lucent Technologies, and Agere Systems. Nalamasu is a recognized expert in materials science and technology with more than 180 publications, review articles, book chapters, and two books to his credit, and he has approximately 50 issued or filed patents. He has won several national and inter­ ational awards, including n the 2004 ACS Roy W. Tess Award, the 2000 ACS Team Innovation Award, the 1998 Japan Photopolymer Science and Technology Award, two R&D 100 Awards, and the 1997 Bell Labs President’s Gold Medal. Nalamasu is a member of the Board of Directors of Semiconductor Research Corporation, the San Jose Tech Museum, and Plextronics, and he has served on the National Research Council’s Panel on Materials Science and Engineering, as well as several technical advisory boards and university advisory committees. He received his Ph.D. from the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. WOLFGANG POROD is the Frank M. Freimann Professor of Electrical Engineer- ing at the University of Notre Dame. He received his Diploma (M.S.) and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Graz, Austria, in 1979 and 1981, respectively. After appointments as a postdoctoral fellow at Colorado State University and as a senior research analyst at Arizona State University, he joined the University of Notre Dame in 1986. He is the recipient of the Electrical Engineering Department’s 2000 Joel and Ruth Spira Award for Excellence in Teaching and the College of Engineering 2005 Kaneb Teaching Award. He now also serves as the director of Notre Dame’s Center for Nano Science and Technology. His research interests are in the area of nanoelectronics, with an emphasis on new circuit concepts for novel devices. He is the co-inventor of the Quantum-Dot Cellular Automata (QCA) concept, which is a new way of representing information by electronic charge configurations at

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136 Triennial Review of the N at i o n a l N a n o t e c h n o l o g y I n i t i at i v e the ­ olecular level. In recent years, he has demonstrated nanomagnetic imple- m mentations of the original QCA concept, which now is known as Nanomagnet Logic (NML). NML is one of the emerging device technologies pursued by the Nanoelectronics Research Initiative sponsored by the Semiconductor Research Corporation. He has authored some 300 publications and presentations. He is a fellow of the IEEE and has served as the vice president for publications on the IEEE Nanotechnology Council and as an associate editor for the IEEE Transactions on Nanotechnology. He has been active in organizing special sessions and tutorials and as a speaker in IEEE distinguished lecturer programs. In 2009, he was awarded a Hans Fischer Senior Fellowship with the Institute for Advanced Study at the Techni- cal University of Munich, which is sponsored by the German Excellence Initiative. In Germany, he participated in the study “Nanoelectronics as a Future Key Technol- ogy for Information and Communication Technologies in Germany,” organized by the German National Academy of Science and Engineering. His expertise includes nanotechnology, materials science and engineering, and research management. ALAN RAE is managing member at TPF Enterprises, LLC, a technology commer- cialization and business development company he founded in 2009, based at the UB Technology Incubator. He has worked in the electronics, ceramics, nanotechnology, and “clean tech” industries for more than 25 years in the United Kingdom and United States, managing global businesses and technology development at a start- up, operating company, and corporate level. Rae is active in electronics industry associations and standards work. He is director of research for iNEMI and is also active with SMTA, IMAPS, IPC, and JISSO. He holds director and vice-president positions with four new companies and consults for two Fortune 100 companies in alternative energy. He is technical editor for Global Solar Technology, a leading alternative energy publication; an Entrepreneur in Residence with NYSERDA; and a member of the Directed Assistance Committee for NYSERDA’s Directed Energy Program. His expertise includes nanotechnology, research management, technol- ogy insertion, manufacturing processes and management, and economics. ELSA REICHMANIS (NAE) is a professor of chemical and biomolecular engi- neering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Prior to joining Georgia Tech, she was director of materials research at Bell Labs, Alcatel-Lucent. She is noted for the discovery, development, and engineering leadership of new families of lithographic materials and processes that enable very-large-scale integration manufacturing. Her research interests include the design and development of polymeric and hybrid organic/inorganic materials for electronic and photonic applications. A particular focus relates to organic/polymer semiconducting materials and processes for plastic electronics and photovoltaics. She is the recipient of several awards, was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1995, and has participated in several

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A pp e n d i x D 137 National Research Council (NRC) activities. She currently serves as a member of the NSF Math and Physical Sciences Advisory Committee, recently served as co- chair of the NRC Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology, and was a member of the Visiting Committee on Advanced Technology of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). She is an elected member of the Bureau of the International Union for Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC). She has been active in the American Chemical Society throughout her career, having served as 2003 president of the society. In other technical activities, she served as a member of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board, and she is an associate editor of the ACS journal Chemistry of Materials. Her expertise includes materials science and engi- neering, technology development, technology insertion, manufacturing processes, and management. JUDITH STEIN obtained her B.A. in chemistry from Douglass College and a Ph.D. in inorganic chemistry under the mentorship of Prof. John Fackler at Case Western Reserve University. After an IBM-sponsored postdoctoral fellowship with Prof. Earl Muetterties at the University of California, Berkeley, she joined GE in 1982. She has more than 29 years of experience in silicone chemistry materials sci- ence, surface science, catalysis, and nanoscience and has contributed to a variety of commercialized GE products, including Silicone II construction sealant, LIM 8040 liquid silicone rubber, and UV 9305 and SL 6000 release coatings. Stein has served as the principal investigator on numerous government contracts, including a DARPA contract in which a team composed of industry, government, and univer- sity partners developed foul release coatings technology that was commercialized by Fuji Hunt Smart Surfaces. In 2001, Stein became one of the founding members of the Nanotechnology AT program, in which she benchmarked nanotechnology efforts worldwide. Previous research areas include superhydrophobic coatings, ice- phobic coatings, magnetic cell separations, and contrast agent-mediated therapy. She is currently the associate director of the Energy Frontier Research Center for Electrocatalysis, Transport Phenomena, and Innovative Materials for Energy Stor- age, and she also serves as the technical regulations and standards advocacy leader at GE Global Research. She served two terms on the Technical Advisory Group to the President’s Council of Advisors to Science and Technology. She also serves on the board of the Michigan Nanotechnology Institute for Medicine and Biological Sciences and on the editorial board of Biofouling. She co-authored Research Direc- tions II: Long-Term Research and Development Opportunities in Nanotechnology, the report of the National Nanotechnology Initiative 2004 Workshop, and Chemi- cal Industry R&D Roadmap for Nanomaterials by Design: From Fundamentals to Function. Stein has chaired numerous conferences, including the NSF Inorganic Chemistry Workshop, and she has served as vice chair of the Organic Coatings and Films Gordon Research Conference. She has been elected a U.S. nanotechnology

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138 Triennial Review of the N at i o n a l N a n o t e c h n o l o g y I n i t i at i v e expert for the International Organization for Standardization and currently leads the Strategy Task Group for Nanotechnology Terminology and Nomenclature. She has also served as an ad hoc member of the NIH Nanotechnology Study Group. Stein holds 48 U.S. patents, and she received a GE 125 Publications Award in 2007. CHARLES F. ZUKOSKI (NAE) is the Elio Eliakim Tarika Chaired Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois, and a Senior A*STAR Fellow of the Agency of Science, Technology and Research, Singapore. Zukoski is a chemical and biomolecular engineer whose professional work focuses on leading, enabling, and supporting research initiatives, technology transfer, and economic development. His research interests lie in nanocomposites, nanoparticle formation, and suspension rheology. He was vice chancellor for research at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign from 2002 to 2008. From 2005 to 2012 Zukoski served as chair of the Science and Engineering Research Council (SERC) of the Agency for Science Technology and Research, Singapore, where he worked with seven A*STAR research institutes in charting new directions and strategies that will sustain economic growth in Singapore. Zukoski is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering. His expertise includes research management, technology development, and technology insertion.