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INSTITUTE OF CHEMICAL BIOLOGY AND FUNDAMENTAL MEDICINE, ICBFM (NOVOSIBIRSK)

ISTC and NIH have supported projects at this institute aimed at investigations of (a) mechanisms of DNA repair in mammalian cells, (b) papilloma virus infection and associated epigenetic effects important for progression of cervical cancer, (c) epidemiological studies of tuberculosis in the Novosibirsk region, (d) molecular biology of Borrelia burgdorferi (Lyme disease), and (e) ecology of Siberian bogs. CRDF, ISTC, and the Food and Drug Administration have provided grants to ICBFM, along with grants to Vector, for development of oligonucleotide microarrays for identification and genotyping of influenza A, hepatitis C, and orthopoxviruses. Researchers at ICBFM have collaborated with Cornell University on development of computer programs for prediction of biopolymer folding and design of small molecules, targeted to specific nucleic acids and proteins.

The institute is interested in collaboration in the following areas: (a) investigation of infectious agents transmitted by ticks in Russia and the United States on the basis of genetic analysis of pathogens, (b) development of therapeutic phages for controlling bacterial infections, (c) search for viral markers in patients with cardiovascular diseases, (d) investigation of circulating DNA and RNA as potential biomarkers, (e) new approaches for personal and predictive medicine, (e) cell technologies for regenerative medicine, (g) development of telemedicine approaches, (h) development of micro- and nanofluidic analytical systems, (i) investigation of prehistoric and extremophilic microorganisms, and (j) comparative molecular genetic studies of viral intestinal infections.

INSTITUTE OF GENERAL AND EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY, IGEB (ULAN-UDE)

The institute is interested in future collaboration in the development of therapeutically useful preparations of medicinal plants.

INSTITUTE OF LIMNOLOGY, LIN (IRKUTSK)

LIN investigated different aspects of ecology of Lake Baikal: microalgae, endemic plants, and fish and animal species. Researchers have isolated biologically active compounds, as potential therapeutics, from endemic organisms. The research was performed in collaboration with a number of U.S. universities (University of California, Davis; University of Washington, Institute of Oceanography, Harbor-Branch; University of Southern Mississippi; New York Museum of Natural History). It has been supported by CRDF, NSF, the Global Change and Climate History Program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the National Geographic Society, and the Samuel Freeman Charitable Trust.



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