Appendix D

Presentation Abstracts

Speaker: Kevin Geiss, Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Energy

Presentation Title: Vision for the Workshop

The U.S. Air Force is a leader in energy security with a history of innovation in identifying ways to reduce demand and increase the supply of energy. In the area of alternative fuels, the Air Force has worked for six years to certify aircraft on a range of alternative fuels including Fischer-Tropsch, Hydroprocessed Renewable Jet and Alcohol to Jet fuel types. Along the way the Air Force accomplished a number of “firsts” including the first aerial refueling, first supersonic flight, and first flight by an aerial demonstration team (the Thunderbirds). This certification has been shared with the aviation industry through the Commercial Aviation Alternative Fuels Initiative (CAAFI) and leveraged by airlines that now fly select routes on biofuel blends. Dr. Geiss’ presentation reviews the Air Force’s alternative fuel accomplishments and highlight areas of current and future research, testing and application. This includes on-going certification of aircraft on alternative fuels, months-long field testing of drone aircraft on biofuels and analysis of the long-term impacts of biofuels on engine components. Dr. Geiss will also discuss partnerships with other U.S. government and military entities, foreign countries and industry. These partnerships allow the Air Force to share its knowledge and expertise with the fuel-engine interface with outside organizations who can then bring their own knowledge and perspectives to the issue.

Speaker: Joseph Sikes, Director of Facilities Energy Privatization, Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Instillations and Environment

Presentation Title: OSD Initiatives

This talk will highlight the following OSD initiatives:



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Appendix D Presentation Abstracts Speaker: Kevin Geiss, Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Energy Presentation Title: Vision for the Workshop The U.S. Air Force is a leader in energy security with a history of innovation in identifying ways to reduce demand and increase the supply of energy. In the area of alternative fuels, the Air Force has worked for six years to certify aircraft on a range of alternative fuels including Fischer Tropsch, Hydroprocessed Renewable Jet and Alcohol to Jet fuel types. Along the way the Air Force accomplished a number of “firsts” including the first aerial refueling, first supersonic flight, and first flight by an aerial demonstration team (the Thunderbirds). This certification has been shared with the aviation industry through the Commercial Aviation Alternative Fuels Initiative (CAAFI) and leveraged by airlines that now fly select routes on biofuel blends. Dr. Geiss’ presentation reviews the Air Force’s alternative fuel accomplishments and highlight areas of current and future research, testing and application. This includes on going certification of aircraft on alternative fuels, months long field testing of drone aircraft on biofuels and analysis of the long term impacts of biofuels on engine components. Dr. Geiss will also discuss partnerships with other U.S. government and military entities, foreign countries and industry. These partnerships allow the Air Force to share its knowledge and expertise with the fuel engine interface with outside organizations who can then bring their own knowledge and perspectives to the issue. Speaker: Joseph Sikes, Director of Facilities Energy Privatization, Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Instillations and Environment Presentation Title: OSD Initiatives This talk will highlight the following OSD initiatives: 49

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DoD Goals and Objectives 2011 Annual Energy Management Report (AEMR) Status of Performance Metrics Validity of Performance Metrics What to expect in the Next Administration Speaker: Paul Bollinger, Director, Boeing Energy, Boeing Defense, Space and Security Presentation Title: Boeing Internal Resources Reduction Initiative The Boeing Company is the world’s largest and most diversified aerospace company with Commercial and Defense, Space & Security partners and customers in more than 90 countries. We have more than 172,000 employees and 86 million square feet of floor space. While Boeing is aggressively driving toward greater sustainability in all aspects of our business, this presentation focuses on our internal operations, manufacturing and office conservation initiatives. Boeing is on track to meet externally communicated five year Environmental Targets for reductions in energy consumption, greenhouse gas, hazardous waste generation and water use, as well as an increase in recycling rate. In addition, Boeing has established a LEED Silver standard for all new construction and building refurbishments and utilizes industry tools and best practices like EPA ENERGY STAR programs to continuously improve the efficiency of sites and buildings. To ensure meeting Company goals, the enterprise Conservation Initiative is comprised of eight focus areas that are driven by specific strategies, goals, communications and monthly metrics at all levels from individual sites up to the headquarters in Chicago. Conservation Focus Areas include: Energy Conservation, Renewable Energy, Sustainable Site & Building Design, Solid Waste & Recycling, Hazardous Waste, Water Conservation, Fleet Management and Alternative Commuting. Conservation strategies have also been incorporated into our Lean practices and workshops across the enterprise. Other programs that help drive greater sustainability include empowering more than 6,000 Employee Involvement Teams across the company to improve efficiency and eliminate waste. The annual internal Conservation Awards Program recognizes excellence in ten sustainability categories. Boeing also competes for external awards and recognition and has been named an EPA ENERGY STAR Industrial Partner of the Year for the past two consecutive years. Boeing’s commitment to environmental stewardship starts at the top. Jim McNerney, President and Chief Executive Officer, in response to Boeing being awarded the 2012 Partner of the Year Award, stated “This ongoing achievement showcases our employees’ commitment to champion the environment in everything we do – from developing and building our products to improving the efficiency of the infrastructure that supports them. This recognition is a reminder that all of us need to do our part to reduce consumption and conserve energy.” 50

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Speaker: Col Douglas Wise, Chief, CE Operations and Readiness Division, HQ AFMC/A70 Presentation Title: AFMC Facility Energy Program The DoD is the largest single user of energy in the US. In 2011, the DoD spent almost $20B on energy and the Air Force made up almost half of that amount. The vast majority of the Air Force's energy use is for aviation fuels with smaller amounts consumed in facilities/utilities and transportation energy. For AFMC, the figures for aviation and facilities/utilities energy are reversed. AFMC therefore is focusing on facilities/utilities energy. In addition, AFMC is falling short of Executive Order goals for energy and water intensity reduction. By 2015, it is estimated that AFMC will fall 10% short of the energy intensity goal. To close this gap, AFMC needs to look at loads not associated with the facility envelope. This type of energy is defined as Process Energy, which includes IT, labs, medical, and industrial energy. For AFMC, we are currently focusing on our large industrial complexes as they consume a significant portion of our energy. This energy is currently being termed Industrial Process Energy (IPE). In 2012, AFMC/A6/7 partnered with AFMC/A4 to initiate an IPE IPT. AFMC/A4 subsequently took the lead to develop an IPE action plan, which is currently under development. Speaker: Col Stephen Wood, Vice Commander, Air Force Sustainment Center Presentation Title: Air Force Sustainment Center: Process Energy Update Col Steve Wood will discuss key aspects of Air Force Sustainment Center process energy. The discussion framework is provided so the audience can understand the Air Force and Air Force Material Command energy environment, and then AFSC’s Energy & infrastructure portfolio supported by detailed data associated with AFSC installations; Tinker, Hill, and Robins AFBs. Follow on emphasis is provided regarding AFSC/CC Energy Philosophy as well as accomplishment, challenges, enablers, and future focus for process energy reductions. Speaker: Kirk Rutland, Technical Director, Test Sustainment Division, Arnold Engineering and Development Complex Presentation Title: Energy Reduction: AEDC Perspective AEDC is a primary ground test component within DoD’s Major Range and Test Facility Base (MRTFB). As part of the MRTFB, AEDC’s mission is to provide decision quality data for acquisition programs. It’s extensive suite of test facilities are operated and maintained using Air Force RDT&E funding. Historically, approximately 92% of the energy consumed at AEDC is directly related to the test mission. Annual fluctuations in total energy demand are a product of the type and level of test workload. The majority of AEDC’s test infrastructure was designed and constructed prior to 1980 and is heavily 51

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dependent on electrical power to create the required test environment. Energy efficiency was not a critical design component. While the Air Force has made significant AEDC infrastructure investments over the last decade, the focus was on developing and sustaining critical test capabilities driven by acquisition program requirements. Marginal improvements in energy consumption have been made but not tracked. AEDC is currently evaluating 14 different energy reduction proposals, but the RDT&E funding pressures prevent major investments for energy reduction initiatives. Since the AEDC test facilities are coded RDT&E, they are prevented from competing for USAF Energy funding. Speaker: Cameron Stanley, Support Contractor, Air Force Research Laboratory Presentation Title: Environmental and Energy (E2) Technology Programs The Advanced Power Technology Office (APTO) is AFRL's post S&T RDT&E focus on facility power and energy demonstrations. APTO has performed several technology demonstrations at large facilities across the Air Force. Primarily, demonstrations have highlighted technologies in the following 5 technology focus areas: Renewable Energy Integration, Energy Storage, Hydrogen, Waste to Energy, and Advanced Energy Technologies. The APTO technology development process, which includes requirements gathering, technology selection, solution development, operational validation, and transition planning, provides energy technology solutions that meet the needs of the operational Air Force and demonstrates enhanced capability while reducing energy consumption and environmental impact. The lessons learned from testing and demonstrating these technologies can be leveraged to address process energy issues at Air Force depots. Speaker: Thomas Hicks, Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Energy Presentation Title: Department of the Navy Energy Program No abstract submitted. Speaker: Sandrine Schultz, Energy Program Manager, Navy Installations Command Presentation Title: Commander, Navy Installations Command Navy Shore Energy Program Brief No abstract submitted. 52

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Speaker: John Dwyer, Deputy Chief of Staff for Logistics (G4), Army Materiel Command Presentation Title: AMC Facilities Energy Program AMC’s Energy Program used four basic tenants: Planning Put plans in place to drive down demand and costs; Commander Visibility and Emphasis Commanders must have a good handle on their energy requirements and associated costs; Technology include energy considerations in construction and renovation projects by applying technology solutions; Communication: Share successes and challenges. AMC uses opportunities to increase productivity and energy efficiency through the use of Sustainment, Restoration and Modernization (SRM) funds at installations such as Tobyhanna, AD, Adaptive re use of older facilities at installations such as Anniston AD, and new construction to consolidated facilities with reduced energy footprint at Corpus Christi AD. AMC’s estimates a total investment of $360M is required (~ 2 3 times AMC’s annual energy expenditure) to meet its 30% energy intensity reductions goal by FY15. AMC will leverage available authorities to establish long term public/private partnerships (Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPC), Utility Energy Services Contracts (UESC), Enhanced Use Lease (EUL), Power Purchase Agreements (PPA) to provide sources for private sector financing for AMC energy projects. AMC currently has six active ESPCs with total third party investment > $88M and is actively pursuing third party financing at four AMC Installations and one UESC execution at another. AMC’s approach to third party financing will conduct detailed energy audits and evaluate industrial process efficiency as part of ESPCs and other third party financing opportunities to provide detailed evaluations of energy using systems. The systems include compressed air and the associated distribution system, motors, lighting, HVAC/building pressurization, boiler/steam system decentralization and other energy using systems such as refrigeration, melting furnaces, process ovens, cracking towers, welding operations. Measurement and verification (M&V) of energy performance through utility metering is paramount to provide an indicator of success for the third party financed projects. Speaker: Timothy Unruh, Program Manager, Federal Energy Management Program, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Presentation Title: Federal Energy Management Program Overview No abstract submitted. 53

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Speaker: Al Hildreth, PE, CEM, Company Energy Manager, General Motors Presentation Title: GM’s Robust Energy Management System Energy use is a large, but mandatory, expense incurred by manufacturers or facility operators and contributes to Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions. At General Motors (GM), although our expenditure for energy is not a large percentage of our total cost, we do spend in excess of $1 Billion USD annually. GHG emissions from energy use represent over 7 million metric tons per year of GM’s carbon footprint. Hence, a robust Energy Management business process is needed to meet the challenge for industry. Management of energy and carbon to reduce environmental impact has become important enough to be included in our business plan, similar to safety, people, quality, responsiveness, and cost. Following a model similar to EPA Energy Star’s seven step approach, energy as an environmental element has been integrated into GM’s business policy and model. Based on top level commitment and public goals to reduce energy and GHG by 20% from 2010 to 2020, GM uses its standardized Global Manufacturing System (GMS) to ensure that energy efficiency and conservation is properly managed through performance assessment, action plans, evaluating progress, and recognizing achievements. The methods used to integrate energy management into our business plan include dedicated resources at all levels in the organization. With people as one of our most important resources, having qualified energy leaders at the corporate, global, regional and site levels is key to our success. To implement initiatives a dedicated budget for systems and projects is required, similar to other areas of the business. Forecasting energy, establishing targets, implementing projects and processes, regular monitoring, and corrective action when required ensures timely adherence to meeting our energy and carbon goals. GM recognizes achievements internally with various processes – Plant energy performance recognition, employee suggestions, employee compensation tied to business results, and others. Also, GM’s recognition of our energy performance externally includes many awards and recognitions – EPA Energy Star labels for 2 facilities, meeting Energy Star’s Challenge for Industry for 54 plants globally over the past year avoiding $90 Million USD and 1.2 million metric tons of GHG emissions, and winning a 2012 Energy Star Partner of the year award in Energy Management, along with many global, regional, and local awards for protecting the environment. Speaker: James Porter, Jr., Chief Engineer and Vice President Engineering and Operations, DuPont(Retired); Founder and President, Sustainable Operations Solutions, LLC Presentation Title: Sustainable Energy Management “An Industrial Perspective” The primary focus of the presentation was what is an effective leadership model to embed energy management in an organization so they can “Make Energy a Consideration In All We Do”? The model currently practiced in DuPont was highlighted and an energy management Tool Box was outlined. Focus areas for dealing with process 54

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energy management as well as core considerations to lead a culture change were discussed. Speaker: Roger Weir, Energy Manager, ATK Aerospace Systems Presentation Title: ATK Energy Efficiency Initiatives ATK is a Fortune 500 aerospace, defense, and commercial products company with operations in 21 states, the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, and internationally. World’s top producer of solid rocket propulsion systems. World’s largest producer of military ammunition. Leader in affordable precision weapons, propellants, and energetic. Leading brands in law enforcement and sporting ammunition. Leading brands in soldier systems, sporting, and hunting accessories. Provider of advanced composite structures, satellite components, and subsystems. ATK operates in 3 business units; Aerospace, Defense and Sporting. Enterprise wide Energy Team formed in 2003, 24 locations participate on the corporate team. Emphasis is on communication and sharing of best practices and lessons learned. The Team has four “working groups” centered on: Lighting, Compressed Air, Steam, and Natural Gas. Working groups meet monthly to discuss issues impacting energy costs and efficiency. Team Mission: Manage Energy Costs and Consumption – Not just pay bills. Work with providers and regulators to control costs and maximize savings. Develop meaningful measures of energy performance. Facilitate implementation of cost effective energy projects. Encourage Communication, within locations and across all locations. Provide Forum to share Best Practices as well as Lessons Learned. Be a single source for all energy and energy related information. Track Green House Gas emissions and minimize carbon footprint. Cultivate increased energy awareness across all ATK employees. Team projects generate more than $2M in annual energy savings and total actual energy usage has been decreasing consistently for the past 3 years. Focus of many of the projects has been to identify waste, make use of it or eliminate it. Efficiency improvements have been included in many process improvement projects. Measuring energy usage and providing data and usage goals to operating areas has been a focus at several locations ATK has also been actively engaged with DOE to help develop new energy technologies to put wasted energy to use and optimize operation of renewable resources and electric storage. Speaker: Col Gregory Ottoman, Chief, Environment and Energy Division, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Logistics, Installations, and Mission Support Presentation Title: Air Force Facility Energy Initiatives The Air Force Facility Energy Program is focused on making sound fiscal investments, meeting Air Force mission requirements, and complying with numerous statutory goals and executive orders. The Air Force has made significant investments in energy and water conservations projects over the last 18 years that have reduced energy 55

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consumption by 35%. This translates into annual cost avoidance in FY11 estimated at $579M. While great progress has been made, the Air Force, along with the other Services, is challenged in meeting the aggressive mandates and goals. The Air Force is executing an investment strategy that combines direct appropriated funds investment along with third party financed projects to conserve energy and water as well as increase production of renewable energy. Another initiative is significantly increased use of facility meters along with an advance meter reading IT system. While, this is mandated under EPACT 05 and EISA 07, it is also a key enabler in the Air Force energy program, helping to identify energy efficiencies and provide measurement and validation of previous efforts. The Air Force is in the early stages of establishing a “Net Zero” energy, water, and waste implementation strategy that integrates the on going efforts in all three areas, while seeking to maximize conservation results, improve energy security, and minimize long term environmental liabilities. 56