of process energy termed “industrial process energy” (IPE), which includes the energy-intensive industrial processes that occur within Air Force facilities, such as the following:

•  Assembly and disassembly

•  Avionics testing

•  Engine testing

•  Composite construction

•  Chemical cleaning

•  Heat treating

•  Painting and de-painting

•  Plating

•  Metalworking

•  Nondestructive inspection

IPE has been defined as “energy consumed by high-intensity processes or mission-critical applications that are not the traditional creature comforts of the building (e.g., heating, cooling, lighting, and domestic hot water)”6 as shown schematically in Figure 1-2. An estimated 35-50 percent of AFMC’s energy consumption at its Air Logistics Complexes (ALCs) is process energy—primarily industrial process energy. Thus, although IPE is not a large fraction of overall Air Force energy use (approximately 1 percent) and has received relatively little attention, investments in IPE efficiency are expected to yield high rates of return. These reductions in energy use enhance overall Air Force energy security; the savings can be applied to enhance mission capability in other areas.

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FIGURE 1-1 Breakdown of energy usage in the U.S. Air Force (USAF) and the Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC). NOTE: GSA, General Services Administration; sf, square feet. SOURCE: Col Stephen Wood, Vice Commander, 72nd Air Base Wing, presentation to the workshop, November 5, 2012, Washington, D.C.

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6U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Federal Energy Management Program.



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