Appendix A

Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Honorable Claude M. Bolton, Jr., Chair, became the executive-in-residence for the Defense Acquisition University (DAU) on January 3, 2008. Mr. Bolton's primary focus is assisting the DAU president achieve the congressional direction to recruit, retain, train and educate the Department of Defense (DoD) acquisition workforce. He is also a management consultant to defense and commercial companies and is a board member for several companies. Prior to becoming the DAU executive-in-residence, Mr. Bolton served as the assistant secretary of the army for acquisition, logistics and technology (ASAALT). As the ASA (ALT), he served as the army acquisition executive, the senior procurement executive, and the science advisor to the secretary. Mr. Bolton oversaw the Elimination of Chemical Weapons Program and had oversight and executive authority over the Project and Contracting Office charged with Iraq reconstruction. He was responsible for appointing, managing, and evaluating program executive officers as well as managing the Army Acquisition Corps and Army Acquisition Workforce. Mr. Bolton retired as a Major General in the U.S. Air Force following a highly decorated career. Some highlights of his Air Force service include serving as the commander of the Air Force Security Assistance Center, where he managed foreign military sales programs with totals exceeding $90 billion that supported more than 80 foreign countries; serving as a test pilot for the F-4, F-111, and F-16; program executive officer for the Air Force Fighter and Bomber programs; and the first program manager for the Advance Tactical Fighter Technologies program, which evolved into the F-22 System Program Office. An experienced command pilot flying more than 40 different aircraft including Army helicopters, during the Vietnam War he flew 232 combat missions, 40 over North Vietnam. Mr. Bolton served as commandant of the Defense Systems Management College and as inspector general and director of requirements at Air Force Materiel Command headquarters. Mr. Bolton's education includes a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering from the University of Nebraska, a master's degree in management from Troy State University; and an M.A. in national security and strategic studies from the Naval War College. In 2006, he was awarded a D.Sc. (Honoris Causa) from Cranfield University. In May, he was awarded an Honorary Doctor of Science degree from the University of Nebraska. Mr. Bolton is a member of the NRC’s Air Force Studies Board and is a past member of the Committee on Evaluation of U.S. Air Force Preacquisition



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Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Honorable Claude M. Bolton, Jr., Chair, became the executive-in-residence for the Defense Acquisition University (DAU) on January 3, 2008. Mr. Bolton's primary focus is assisting the DAU president achieve the congressional direction to recruit, retain, train and educate the Department of Defense (DoD) acquisition workforce. He is also a management consultant to defense and commercial companies and is a board member for several companies. Prior to becoming the DAU executive-in-residence, Mr. Bolton served as the assistant secretary of the army for acquisition, logistics and technology (ASAALT). As the ASA (ALT), he served as the army acquisition executive, the senior procurement executive, and the science advisor to the secretary. Mr. Bolton oversaw the Elimination of Chemical Weapons Program and had oversight and executive authority over the Project and Contracting Office charged with Iraq reconstruction. He was responsible for appointing, managing, and evaluating program executive officers as well as managing the Army Acquisition Corps and Army Acquisition Workforce. Mr. Bolton retired as a Major General in the U.S. Air Force following a highly decorated career. Some highlights of his Air Force service include serving as the commander of the Air Force Security Assistance Center, where he managed foreign military sales programs with totals exceeding $90 billion that supported more than 80 foreign countries; serving as a test pilot for the F-4, F-111, and F-16; program executive officer for the Air Force Fighter and Bomber programs; and the first program manager for the Advance Tactical Fighter Technologies program, which evolved into the F-22 System Program Office. An experienced command pilot flying more than 40 different aircraft including Army helicopters, during the Vietnam War he flew 232 combat missions, 40 over North Vietnam. Mr. Bolton served as commandant of the Defense Systems Management College and as inspector general and director of requirements at Air Force Materiel Command headquarters. Mr. Bolton's education includes a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering from the University of Nebraska, a master's degree in management from Troy State University; and an M.A. in national security and strategic studies from the Naval War College. In 2006, he was awarded a D.Sc. (Honoris Causa) from Cranfield University. In May, he was awarded an Honorary Doctor of Science degree from the University of Nebraska. Mr. Bolton is a member of the NRC’s Air Force Studies Board and is a past member of the Committee on Evaluation of U.S. Air Force Preacquisition 29

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Technology Development and Committee on Optimizing U.S. Air Force and Department of Defense Review of Air Force Acquisition Programs. Claude V. Christianson is director of the Center for Joint and Strategic Logistics at National Defense University. Prior to this position he served as the Chief Executive Officer of Global Logistics Associates LLC, an Alexandria, VA-based, member-owned, limited liability company specializing in professional logistics and supply chain services. Mr. Christianson’s military career culminated as the Director of Logistics, J4, on the Joint Staff. As the J4 he synchronized joint logistics support across all Services and DoD agencies in support of operations worldwide. As the Army’s Deputy Chief of Staff for Logistics, G4, Mr. Christianson drove the fielding of a commercially sourced satellite network to the logistics domain, connecting logisticians across forward-deployed, austere environments. Mr. Christianson served as the Chief of Logistics, C4, Coalition Land Forces Command (CFLCC), during Operation Iraqi Freedom in Kuwait from 2002- 2003, where he directed the planning and execution of logistics support for more than 240,000 ground forces and over more than 300,000 square miles. From 2000-2002, as the Deputy C4 (Logistics) for Combined Forces Command, U.S. Forces Korea Director of Logistics, J4, and Eighth U.S. Army Deputy Commanding General (Support), Mr. Christianson directed the planning and execution of logistics operations in support of all combined and joint forces in Korea. From 1998-2000, Mr. Christianson served as Deputy Commanding General, 21st Theater Support Command, European Theater Support Command in Germany where he coordinated the execution of European logistics support for Operation Joint Guardian (Kosovo). Mr. Christianson is a distinguished military graduate of the North Dakota State University Army ROTC program and holds a B.S. in industrial engineering. Thom J. Hodgson is the James T. Ryan Distinguished University Professor, an Alumni Distinguished Research Professor, co-director of the Operations Research Program, and director of Graduate Programs of Engineering-On-Line at North Carolina State University (NCSU). He served as director of the Integrated Manufacturing Systems Engineering Institute at NCSU (1995-2011); director of the Division of Design and Manufacturing Systems at the National Science Foundation (1991-1993); head of the Industrial Engineering Department at NCSU (1983- 1990); professor of Industrial and Systems Engineering at the University of Florida (1970-1983); operations research analyst at Ford Motor Company (1966-1970); and an officer in the U.S. Army (1961-1963). He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and is a fellow of IIE and INFORMS and is the author or co-author of more than 80 journal articles and book chapters. Dr. Hodgson served as a member of the U.S. Army Science Board (1994-2000) and is a current member of the NRC’s Committee on Energy Reduction at U.S. Air Force Facilities Using Industrial Processes: A Workshop. Ronald Mutzelburg retired from the Boeing Company as the Washington, D.C. director for the Phantom Works and Advanced Systems. His organization managed the relationship with senior U.S. government technology and advanced systems customers, including the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Office of the Director, Defense Research and Engineering, the Office of Naval Research, NASA (Aeronautics), as well as the Office of the Secretary of Defense, Joint Staff, and Military Service technology and long-range capability requirements offices. Prior to 30

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joining Boeing, Mr. Mutzelburg completed a 34-year government career within the DoD where he served in the following positions: deputy director for air warfare, Office of Strategic and Tactical Systems, Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics, where he was responsible for acquisition oversight for the B-1, B-2, C-17, F-22, F-18, Joint Strike Fighter, JSTARS, Unmanned Air Vehicles, several proprietary programs, and numerous air-to-air and air-to-ground weapons programs; assistant program director for the B-2, Aeronautical Systems Division (ASD), Air Force Systems Command; director of fighter propulsion, Propulsion Systems Program Office, ASD; director of Logistics, Propulsion Systems Program Office, ASD. From 1982 to 1983, Mr. Mutzelburg attended the National War College. From 1968-1982, he held numerous managerial and project officer assignments within Air Force Logistics Command. He has received numerous awards and much recognition over the years, including the DoD Distinguished Civilian Service Award (2001) and the Presidential Rank Award. He has an M.S. in industrial and systems engineering from Ohio State University and is a graduate of National War College. Mr. Mutzelburg was a member of the NRC’s Committee on Evaluation of U.S. Air Force Preacquisition Technology Development. Lyle H. Schwartz retired from government service in 2004 after 18 years as a member of the Senior Executive Service. In his last position, as director, Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), he guided the management of the entire basic research investment for the Air Force. He led a staff of more than 200 scientists, engineers, and support staff in Arlington, Virginia, and two foreign technology offices in London and Tokyo. As director he was charged with maintaining the technological superiority of the Air Force. Prior to becoming AFOSR's director, Dr. Schwartz directed the AFOSR's Aerospace and Materials Sciences Directorate. He is known for contributions to phase transitions in iron alloys, applications of Mossbauer spectroscopy, x- ray and neutron diffraction, characterization of catalysts, and policy issues concerning materials science and engineering. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and has written more than 85 technical papers and is co-author of two textbooks in materials science and engineering. Dr. Schwartz is a past member of the NRC’s Air Force Studies Board and was member of the NRC’s Committee on Examination of the U.S. Air Force’s Aircraft Sustainment Needs in the Future and Its Strategy to Meet Those Needs. Raymond Valeika is an independent consultant advising major companies in aviation matters. He is an internationally recognized aviation operations executive with more than 40 years of experience managing large airline maintenance operations, equally comfortable in the United States and abroad dealing with regulators, manufacturers and employees. Mr. Valeika retired from Delta as senior vice president for technical operations where he directed a worldwide maintenance and engineering staff of more than 10,000 professionals, maintaining a fleet of nearly 600 aircraft. Through his leadership and focus on continuous improvement of the human processes in aviation maintenance, Delta Technical Operations consistently rated at the top of the industry for performance benchmarks in the areas of safety, quality, productivity, and reliability. He is currently is on the board of the Flight Safety Foundation as well as on the board of AerCap, Inc., and SRT. In addition, he was senior vice president of technical operations at Continental and vice president of maintenance and engineering at Pan AM. He graduated from St. Louis University with a degree in aeronautical engineering. Mr. Valeika has served on 31

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previous NRC studies sponsored by the Air Force, including the Committee on Examination of the U.S. Air Force’s Aircraft Sustainment Needs in the Future and Its Strategy to Meet Those Needs and the Committee on Analysis of Air Force Engine Efficiency Improvement Options for Large Non-fighter Aircraft. 32