Appendix A
Committee Biographies

Sharon C. Glotzer (Chair) is the Stuart W. Churchill Collegiate Professor of Chemical Engineering and professor of materials science and engineering, at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and director of research computing in the UM College of Engineering. She also holds faculty appointments in physics, applied physics, and macromolecular science and engineering. She received a B.S. in physics from UCLA and a Ph.D. in physics from Boston University. Prior to Michigan, she worked at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Her research focuses on computational nanoscience and simulation of soft matter, self-assembly and materials design, and computational science and engineering, and is sponsored by the DoD, DoE, NSF, and the J.S. McDonnell Foundation. Dr. Glotzer is a fellow of the American Physical Society, a National Security Science and Engineering Faculty Fellow, and was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2011. She has served on the National Research Council’s Solid State Sciences Committee; Technology Warning and Surprise study committee; Biomolecular Materials and Processes study committee; Modeling, Simulation, and Games study committee; and on the Technology Insight: Gauge, Evaluate, and Review (TIGER) Committee. She is involved in roadmapping activities for computational science and engineering, including chairing or co-chairing several workshops, steering committees, and pan-agency initiatives, and serves on the advisory committees for the DOE Office of Advanced Scientific Computing and NSF Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences. Glotzer is also co-founding director of the Virtual School for Computational Science and Engineering (VSCSE) under the auspices of the NSF-funded Blue Waters Petascale Computing Project at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA).

Kenneth I. Berns (NAS/IOM) is director and distinguished professor, UF Genetics Institute/Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Medicine, University of Florida. He has served as a member of the Composite Committee of the United States Medical Licensing Examination, chairman of the Association of American Medical Colleges, president of the Association of Medical School Microbiology and Immunology Chairs, president of the American Society for Virology, president of the American Society for Microbiology, and vice-president of the International Union of Microbiological Societies. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Berns’s research examines the molecular basis of replication of the human parvovirus, adeno-associated virus, and the ability of an adeno-associated virus to establish latent infections and be reactivated. His work has helped provide the basis for use of this virus as a vector for gene therapy. Dr. Berns’s M.D. and his Ph.D. in biochemistry are from the Johns Hopkins University.

Mikhail Shapiro is a neuroscientist, engineer, and technology entrepreneur focused on developing better ways to study the brain’s activity and treat neurological and psychiatric disease. Dr. Shapiro has been named as a Miller Research Fellow at the University of California at Berkeley to develop an independent research program focused on ways to non-invasively sense



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Appendix A Committee Biographies Sharon C. Glotzer (Chair) is the Stuart W. Churchill Collegiate Professor of Chemical Engineering and professor of materials science and engineering, at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and director of research computing in the UM College of Engineering. She also holds faculty appointments in physics, applied physics, and macromolecular science and engineering. She received a B.S. in physics from UCLA and a Ph.D. in physics from Boston University. Prior to Michigan, she worked at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Her research focuses on computational nanoscience and simulation of soft matter, self-assembly and materials design, and computational science and engineering, and is sponsored by the DoD, DoE, NSF, and the J.S. McDonnell Foundation. Dr. Glotzer is a fellow of the American Physical Society, a National Security Science and Engineering Faculty Fellow, and was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2011. She has served on the National Research Council’s Solid State Sciences Committee; Technology Warning and Surprise study committee; Biomolecular Materials and Processes study committee; Modeling, Simulation, and Games study committee; and on the Technology Insight: Gauge, Evaluate, and Review (TIGER) Committee. She is involved in roadmapping activities for computational science and engineering, including chairing or co-chairing several workshops, steering committees, and pan-agency initiatives, and serves on the advisory committees for the DOE Office of Advanced Scientific Computing and NSF Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences. Glotzer is also co-founding director of the Virtual School for Computational Science and Engineering (VSCSE) under the auspices of the NSF-funded Blue Waters Petascale Computing Project at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA). Kenneth I. Berns (NAS/IOM) is director and distinguished professor, UF Genetics Institute/Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Medicine, University of Florida. He has served as a member of the Composite Committee of the United States Medical Licensing Examination, chairman of the Association of American Medical Colleges, president of the Association of Medical School Microbiology and Immunology Chairs, president of the American Society for Virology, president of the American Society for Microbiology, and vice-president of the International Union of Microbiological Societies. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Berns’s research examines the molecular basis of replication of the human parvovirus, adeno-associated virus, and the ability of an adeno- associated virus to establish latent infections and be reactivated. His work has helped provide the basis for use of this virus as a vector for gene therapy. Dr. Berns’s M.D. and his Ph.D. in biochemistry are from the Johns Hopkins University. Mikhail Shapiro is a neuroscientist, engineer, and technology entrepreneur focused on developing better ways to study the brain’s activity and treat neurological and psychiatric disease. Dr. Shapiro has been named as a Miller Research Fellow at the University of California at Berkeley to develop an independent research program focused on ways to non-invasively sense 13

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14 ADAPTIVE MATERIALS AND STRUCTURES: A WORKSHOP REPORT and manipulate brain activity at the molecular level. He studied neuroscience at Brown and received his Ph.D. in biological engineering from MIT as a Hertz and Soros Fellow. Working with Alan Jasanoff and Robert Langer, Shapiro created the first-ever functional MRI sensors for neurotransmitters. He was also a cofounder of Cyberkinetics Neurotechnology Systems, whose BrainGate technology allowed paralyzed people to control external devices directly with their thoughts. As a venture principal at Third Rock Ventures, an $800 million life sciences venture capital firm, Shapiro helped launch companies focused on novel treatments for chronic pain, cancer, and other diseases. In 2010 he was recognized by the Technology Review as one of the world’s top 35 innovators under age 35. George W. Sutton (NAE) is a consultant. He received his B.M.E (with honors) in mechanical engineering from Cornell University and his Ph.D. in mechanics and physics (magna cum laude) from Caltech. He made the first measurements of the stresses in a solid caused by cavitation. He also was the first to measure the heat transfer rate in the throat of a rocket nozzle at Caltech’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. At G.E., he invented the first successful heat protection material for hypersonic reentry into the Earth’s atmosphere. It was an active material – as it was heated during reentry the gases driven off it reduced the heat transfer to the surface. It, and its variants, have been used on all reentry vehicles and satellite film recovery vehicles, including today’s. At the Avco-Everett Research Laboratory he helped develop high-power lasers. For its commercial electron-beam ionized, electrically pumped closed cycle carbon dioxide laser, his contribution was the heat-conducting foil for the electron beam. He also developed the prototype of the electrical transcutaneous energy transfer device, using ferrites, for artificial hearts that has FDA approval for 5,000 transplants. His work on ballistic missile defense included cooled windows, uncooled optical dome and window thermal radiance, stresses, and optical distortions. This included analysis of deformable mirrors to correct aero-optical distortions. He also analyzed the boresight distortion of optical seekers on interceptors due to bending of the vehicle airframe when the divert motors fire. He has written over 100 papers and coauthored three books. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and has served on six studies. He was editor-in- chief of the AIAA Journal for almost 30 years, which he performed in addition to working full time. He is an Honorary Fellow of the AIAA and has received medals and awards for his work. Elias Towe is currently a professor of electrical and computer engineering, and the Albert and Ethel Grobstein Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. He was educated at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where he received the bachelor of science, master of science, and the Ph.D. degrees from the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. Dr. Towe was a Vinton Hayes Fellow at MIT. After leaving MIT he became a professor of electrical and computer engineering, and engineering physics at the University of Virginia. He also served as a program manager in the Microsystems Technology Office at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) while he was a professor at the University of Virginia. In 2001, he joined the faculty at Carnegie Mellon University. Towe is a recipient of several awards and honors that include the National Science Foundation Young Investigator Award, the Young Faculty Teaching Award, and the Outstanding Achievement from the Office of the Secretary of Defense. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the Optical Society of America (OSA), the American Physical Society (APS), and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Haydn N. Wadley is a university professor and Edgar Starke Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Virginia. He joined the department of materials science and engineering in October 1988. He has very broad interests in materials science. His current research explores high-temperature thermal protection systems (thermal barrier coatings, liquid metal heat plates for hypersonic vehicle leading edges) and new materials for the mitigation of

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APPENDIX A 15 high-intensity dynamic loads. He has addressed many fundamental questions associated with the atomic assembly of nanoscopic materials from the vapor phase, the topological structuring of cellular materials, and the processing of high-performance composites. These fundamental studies have been used to develop models and numerical simulations that expose the linkages between a material’s composition/synthesis and its performance. Some of these models have been coupled with in-situ (ultrasonic and electromagnetic) sensors and nonlinear, feedback control algorithms to implement intelligent process control concepts. He has invented and commercialized several vapor deposition technologies that enable the growth of novel thin films and coatings, and developed numerous multifunctional cellular materials including those that support stress while also serving as impact energy absorbers, heat exchange media, electro-chemical power storage systems, or shape morphing structures. Dr. Wadley has spent many years helping the Department of Defense to identify new technology development opportunities in areas as diverse as the exploitation of space and humanitarian relief operations. Haydn Wadley received his bachelor’s degree in chemical physics and his PhD in physics from the University of Reading (UK). Prior to joining the University of Virginia in 1988 he was a senior scientist at the National Institute of Standards and Technology and a leader of its advanced sensors group. He began his research career at the Atomic Energy Research Establishment (Harwell), where he worked on the origins of acoustic emission in materials and radiation damage mechanisms in refractory metals. He has published 411 papers, co-authored a book on cellular materials, holds 18 U.S. patents, and is a fellow of the American Society for Materials and the recipient of several awards. Steven G. Wax is chief technical officer and executive vice president at Strategic Analysis, Inc. He is supporting defense clients in strategic planning and technology innovation across a range of scientific and engineering disciplines including the physical sciences, materials, biology, biomedical sciences, neuroscience, social sciences, and mathematics. Prior to executive level positions at Strategic Analysis, Inc. and SRI International, Dr. Wax spent 35 years working for the Department of Defense as a civilian and a military officer. During that period, he performed and managed government R&D across a broad spectrum of classified and unclassified technology areas. His last government position was as director of the Defense Science Office, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), a $400 million per year office whose technology purview included physical sciences, materials, mathematics, human effectiveness, and the biological sciences, including biological warfare defense. As director, Dr. Wax was responsible for the office’s investment strategy as well as the transition of office technologies to the military. Previous government positions also include deputy director of the Technology Reinvestment Project and an assignment to the National Reconnaissance Office. Dr. Wax is currently a member of the National Materials Manufacturing Board, the Defense Sciences Research Council’s Red Team, and past member of Sandia National Laboratory’s External Review Panel for Materials. He recently served as an external reviewer of ONR’s Discovery and Innovation portfolio. He is also a member of the AFRL’s Human Effectiveness Directorate’s independent Review Team and is serving on the FY12 Committee of Visitors for NSF’s Division of Civil, Mechanical, and Manufacturing Innovation. In 2009, he was the winner of the George Kimball Burgess Memorial Award. Notable technical accomplishments include a major role in the development of DARPA’s strategic plans for both biology and material science as well as the development of two material science program thrusts (Intelligent Processing of Materials and Accelerated Insertion of Materials) that have revolutionized materials processing and insertion. His publications include a review paper on electroactive polymers and one on smart materials. Dr. Wax has a PhD in ceramic engineering from Georgia Institute of Technology, an MS in chemical engineering from the University of Illinois, and a BS in chemical engineering from the University of Massachusetts. Dr. Wax is a retired Air Force Officer.