Appendix C
Speaker Biographies

Daniel J. Inman, Ph.D.,
Chair, Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Michigan

Dr. Inman received his Ph.D. from Michigan State University in mechanical engineering in 1980 and spent 14 years at the University of Buffalo, followed by 19 years at Virginia Tech. Since 1980, he has published eight books (on vibration control, statics, dynamics, and energy harvesting), eight software manuals, 20 book chapters, 300 journal papers, and 555 proceedings papers, given 56 keynote or plenary lectures, graduated 56 Ph.D. students, and supervised more than 75 MS degrees. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Mechanics (AAM), the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), the International Institute of Acoustics and Vibration (IIAV), and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). He is currently technical editor of the Journal of Intelligent Material Systems and Structures (1999- ). He was awarded the ASME Adaptive Structures Award in April 2000, the ASME/AIAA SDM Best Paper Award in April 2001, the SPIE Smart Structures and Materials Life Time Achievement Award in March 2003, the ASME/Boeing Best Paper Award by the ASME Aerospace Structures and Materials Technical Committee 2007, the ASME Den Hartog Award in 2007, and the Lifetime Achievement Award in Structural Health Monitoring in 2009. He has served as a member-at-large on the Society of Experimental Mechanics Executive Board (2008-2010) and as a former chair of the ASME Applied Mechanics Division.

Heinrich Jaeger, Ph.D.,
William J. Friedman and Alicia Townsend Professor of Physics, University of Chicago

Dr. Jaeger received his Ph.D. in physics in 1987, working under Allen Goldman at the University of Minnesota on ultrathin superconducting films. After a postdoctoral position at the University of Chicago, he moved to the Netherlands in 1989 to take up a position as senior researcher at the Delft Institute for Microelectronics and Submicrontechnology. He joined the faculty at the University of Chicago in 1991, directing the Chicago Materials Research Center from 2001 to 2006, and the James Franck Institute from 2007 to 2010. Jaeger is the recipient of a David and Lucille Packard Fellowship for Science and Engineering, an Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship, and a Research Corporation Cottrell Scholarship. He received the University of Minnesota Outstanding Achievement Award and a Llewellyn John and Harriet Manchester Quantrell Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching. Jaeger’s research interests focus on the understanding and control of materials, crossing the boundaries between “hard” condensed matter physics (electronic and magnetic properties of metals and superconductors) and “soft” condensed matter physics (granular materials, colloids, nonlinear dynamics). Currently, his group is involved in projects ranging from the assembly of next-generation nanostructures to investigations of the complex nonlinear behavior of granular materials (these materials include grain, gravel, or



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Appendix C Speaker Biographies Daniel J. Inman, Ph.D., Chair, Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Michigan Dr. Inman received his Ph.D. from Michigan State University in mechanical engineering in 1980 and spent 14 years at the University of Buffalo, followed by 19 years at Virginia Tech. Since 1980, he has published eight books (on vibration control, statics, dynamics, and energy harvesting), eight software manuals, 20 book chapters, 300 journal papers, and 555 proceedings papers, given 56 keynote or plenary lectures, graduated 56 Ph.D. students, and supervised more than 75 MS degrees. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Mechanics (AAM), the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), the International Institute of Acoustics and Vibration (IIAV), and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). He is currently technical editor of the Journal of Intelligent Material Systems and Structures (1999- ). He was awarded the ASME Adaptive Structures Award in April 2000, the ASME/AIAA SDM Best Paper Award in April 2001, the SPIE Smart Structures and Materials Life Time Achievement Award in March 2003, the ASME/Boeing Best Paper Award by the ASME Aerospace Structures and Materials Technical Committee 2007, the ASME Den Hartog Award in 2007, and the Lifetime Achievement Award in Structural Health Monitoring in 2009. He has served as a member-at-large on the Society of Experimental Mechanics Executive Board (2008- 2010) and as a former chair of the ASME Applied Mechanics Division. Heinrich Jaeger, Ph.D., William J. Friedman and Alicia Townsend Professor of Physics, University of Chicago Dr. Jaeger received his Ph.D. in physics in 1987, working under Allen Goldman at the University of Minnesota on ultrathin superconducting films. After a postdoctoral position at the University of Chicago, he moved to the Netherlands in 1989 to take up a position as senior researcher at the Delft Institute for Microelectronics and Submicrontechnology. He joined the faculty at the University of Chicago in 1991, directing the Chicago Materials Research Center from 2001 to 2006, and the James Franck Institute from 2007 to 2010. Jaeger is the recipient of a David and Lucille Packard Fellowship for Science and Engineering, an Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship, and a Research Corporation Cottrell Scholarship. He received the University of Minnesota Outstanding Achievement Award and a Llewellyn John and Harriet Manchester Quantrell Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching. Jaeger’s research interests focus on the understanding and control of materials, crossing the boundaries between “hard” condensed matter physics (electronic and magnetic properties of metals and superconductors) and “soft” condensed matter physics (granular materials, colloids, nonlinear dynamics). Currently, his group is involved in projects ranging from the assembly of next-generation nanostructures to investigations of the complex nonlinear behavior of granular materials (these materials include grain, gravel, or 18

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APPENDIX C 19 pharmaceutical pills all the way to ultrafine powders). Granular materials are key to many industrial processes and also provide new enabling technology for soft robotics. Jay N. Kudva, Ph.D., President/CEO, NextGen Aeronautics, Inc. Dr. Kudva received his BS in aeronautical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology Madras in 1973, and his MS and PhD degrees in aerospace engineering from Virginia Tech in 1976 and 1979, respectively. He was a faculty member at RPI from 1979 to 1980. He worked at Northrop Grumman Corporation from 1980 to 2002, where he managed a structures R&D group and spear-headed division activities on smart materials and adaptive aircraft. During this time, he also taught graduate and undergraduate courses at UCLA, USC, CSULB, CSULA, and Loyola Marymount Universities. In 2003, he founded NextGen Aeronautics with the explicit purpose of developing revolutionary technologies and designs for the next century of flight. NextGen has seen rapid growth since its inception and currently has 36 employees and has completed or has on-going over 100 contracts from DARPA, NASA, AFRL, NAVAIR, and the U.S. Army as well as major defense contractors. As a prime example of NextGen’s innovation, under DARPA sponsorship, NextGen designed, developed, and flight-tested the world’s first two and only in- flight morphing wing autonomous UAVs. This was done in head-to-head competition with major aerospace system integrators. NextGen has a proven record of successfully teaming with universities, small companies, and major defense contractors. Dr. Kudva has published over 60 papers and reports and holds two joint patents on conformal load bearing antenna structures (CLAS). He has delivered invited and keynote talks at universities, national and international conferences and government laboratories. He was honored with the SPIE Smart Structures and Materials Lifetime Achievement Award in 2007 and the AIAA ASME Adaptive Structures Prize in 2010. He is an associate fellow of AIAA. Joerg Lahann, Ph.D., Professor, Departments of Chemical Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, Professor, Biomedical Engineering, and Macromolecular Science and Engineering Dr. Lahann received his B.S. in chemistry from the University of Saarland and an M.S. in chemistry and a Ph.D. macromolecular chemistry from RWTH Aachen University in 1998. He was a postdoctoral associate at MIT’s Department of Chemical Engineering from 1999 to 2001. After his postdoctoral postion at Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology from 2002 to 2003 he joined the University of Michigan faculty as an assistant (2003-2008) and then associate (2008-2012) professor. As of 2012 he became a professor and the director of Biointerfaces Institute. He has been the co-director of the Institute of Functional Interfaces at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology in Germany since 2009. His research interests include designer surfaces, advanced polymers, biomimetic materials, microfluidic devices, engineered microenvironments, and nano-scale self-assembly. Dr. Lahann has won several awards, including the DOD IDEA Award in 2006 and the NSF CAREER Award and Technology Review TR100 Young Innovator Award in 2004. Leslie Ann Momoda, Ph.D., Director, Sensors & Materials Laboratory, HRL Laboratories, LLC, Malibu, Calif. Dr. Momoda joined HRL Laboratories in 1990 after receiving a B.S. in chemical engineering and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in materials science and engineering at UCLA. At HRL, she has performed research and development projects dealing with mixed metal oxide materials for electronic, optical, and chemical sensor applications as well as novel smart materials. She has

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20 ADAPTIVE MATERIALS AND STRUCTURES: A WORKSHOP REPORT over 20 years of experience in the fields of materials synthesis, processing, and characterization for electronic and structural applications. As a research department manager for 10 years, Dr. Momoda led several major projects in smart materials, materials and chemistry for thermal management, gas sensing, and the modeling and prediction of materials reliability. She was also project manager of the DARPA Compact Hybrid Actuator Program (CHAP). As a laboratory director, she now manages a laboratory of 70 scientists and engineers with research in the areas of novel, lightweight, architected materials, active and adaptive structures, electrochemical analysis, energy storage and generation devices, scalable nano-materials processing, novel detector materials, and high Q MEMs devices. She is a member of the Materials Research Society and is on the advisory board for the Materials Science and Engineering departments at the University of California, Los Angeles, the University of California, Riverside, and the University of Southern California. Vladimir V. Tsukruk, Ph.D., Professor, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology Co-Director, Air Force BIONIC Center of Excellence Vladimir V. Tsukruk received his MS degree in physics from the National University of Ukraine, and his PhD and DSc in chemistry and polymer science from the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine. He carried out his postdoctoral research at the universities of Marburg, Germany, and Akron, United States. He is currently a professor at the School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and a co-director of the Air Force BIONIC Center of Excellence. He was elected an APS Fellow in 2010 and an MRS Fellow in 2011. He serves on the editorial advisory boards of six professional journals, has co-authored around 330 refereed articles in archival journals, as well as five co-edited or co-authored books and has organized 10 professional conferences. He is a co-founder of the company SEMADyne. His research in the fields of surfaces and interfaces, molecular assembly, and nano- and bioinspired materials has recently been recognized by the Humboldt Research Award (2009) and the NSF Special Creativity Award (2006), among others, and is supported by NSF, AFOSR, ARO, DARPA, DOE, and private industry. Tsukruk has vast expertise in the fabrication of interfacial nanostructures with emphasis on responsive nanomaterials and biosensing structures and their comprehensive characterization. He has established an excellent experimental facility at a Microanalysis Center with a range of microscopic and spectroscopic methods. His book Scanning Probe Microscopy of Soft Matter: Fundamentals and Practices (Wiley, 2012) is a comprehensive textbook on SPM applications of synthetic and biological materials. Overall, he has trained about 50 students and postdoctoral associates who currently work in academia and in leading research centers (MIT, Washington University, AFRL, Dow, DuPont, and Intel). Edward V. White Boeing Associate Technical Fellow, Enterprise-wide Adaptive Structures Technology Focus Team Leader, Lead for Structural Health Management, St. Louis, Missouri Mr. White has 36 years of experience at the Boeing Company in the areas of structural dynamics and loads, and for the last 22 years in smart structures technology development. Since June 1994 he has been team leader of the Smart Structures and Systems team in the Boeing Research and Technology organization in St. Louis. As team leader, Mr. White is responsible for leading a multi-disciplinary/multi-site group pursuing both contracted and internal research and development into adaptive structures technology. The Smart Structures and Systems team is developing technologies such as embedded sensors and actuators and for both shape change and

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APPENDIX C 21 load suppression applications, technology and methods for embedding devices into composite materials, information processing of data collected from these systems, control of smart structures and applications of intelligent systems technology such as neural networks and expert systems. The primary application thrust areas of this research are adaptive structures, including shape change, morphing, and load and vibration/acoustics suppression; structural health management; and applications of intelligent systems technology to structures control and data processing. Mr. White is currently principal investigator (PI) for a NASA contract to develop novel control effectors for generation-after-next commercial aircraft. The research is based on the variable geometry raked wing tip concept developed by Mr. White and others. He is also PI for the NextGen Aeronautics lead contract on the DARPA/STO Structural Logic program. He also is the PI for two Boeing internally funded research projects in adaptive structures. Mr. White was previously the program manager for the Smart Aircraft and Marine Projects Demonstration (SAMPSON) program. Under a cooperative agreement with DARPA, the SAMPSON program demonstrated high-pay-off applications of smart structures technology to aircraft inlets and marine turbomachinery. The SAMPSON program was conducted by a formal consortium of three major organizations, then McDonnell Douglas Aerospace, General Dynamics Electric Boat, and Pennsylvania State University. Mr. White held the overall lead position for the SAMPSON consortium with direct responsibility to the DARPA customer. Mr. White also managed the U.S. Air Force Active Buffet Load Alleviation program. The focus of this program is to study the design and integration of an active buffet load alleviation system for fighter aircraft. Mr. White received his B.S. in aerospace engineering from Pennsylvania State University in 1976 and an M.S in mechanical engineering from Washington University in 1984. Manfred Wuttig, Ph.D., Professor, and Director of Graduate Program, Materials Science and Engineering, University of Maryland After having finished his physics and physical metallurgy education in Dresden and Berlin in 1960 Manfred Wuttig moved to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in January 1962 as a postdoctoral associate. At this time, spurred by nuclear reactor safety concerns, defects in solids constituted a major portion of materials science, and his first publications addressed this theme. Related work on magnetic properties of defects earned him an invitation to Grenoble, where he worked in the laboratory at Institute Neel. Teaching in a metallurgy department (University of Missouri, Rolla, 1965-1984), he became interested in martensite. He moved to the University of Maryland via a stint as program director at NSF, and started work on ferroic films which later on broadened to multiferroics. This lead to a MURI, which triggered the worldwide explosion of this topic. Today, Dr. Wuttig’s interests are turning from hard to soft multiferroics. Here, the intriguing possibility exists that one can control ferroic properties with light. He is an internationally recognized materials scientist with 256 publications in high impact journals and 7,900 citations.