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Appendix C Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff WILLIAM S. MARRAS (Chair) is a professor of engineering and holds the Honda endowed chair in the Department of Integrated Systems Engineering at Ohio State University. He is also director of the Biodynamics Labora- tory and holds adjunct appointments in the Departments of Orthopedic Surgery, the Department of Physical Medicine, and Biomedical Engineer- ing, and executive director of the university’s Institute for Ergonomics and director of its Center for Occupational Health in Automotive Manufactur- ing. His research applies quantitative engineering techniques to occupa- tional surveillance, laboratory studies, and mathematical modeling. He has worked extensively on low back pain, both its occupational causality and techniques for its clinical assessment and treatment. He was awarded an honorary doctor of science degree from the University of Waterloo for his work on the biomechanics of low back disorders. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He has a B.S. in systems engineering– human factors engineering, an M.S. in industrial engineering, and a Ph.D. in bioengineering and ergonomics. DAVID BEERBOWER is principal at Beerbower Safety Associates, LLC. Previously, he was vice president for safety for Peabody Energy, a private- sector coal company, where he was responsible for corporate-wide safety policies and programs and compliance with mine safety and health laws and regulations for the company and its subsidiaries and affiliates worldwide. Following a progression of coal mine operations management positions with several coal companies, Mr. Beerbower joined Peabody in 1991 as director of safety and health for Eastern Associated Coal Corporation in Charleston, 163

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164 IMPROVING SELF-ESCAPE FROM UNDERGROUND COAL MINES West Virginia. The following year, he was named vice president of safety in the St. Louis headquarters where he continued to direct the company’s health and safety efforts. He has served as chair of the health and safety committee at the Bituminous Coal Operators of America, vice chair of the health and safety committee at the National Mining Association, chair of the coal and energy division of the Society for Mining, Metallurgy, and Exploration. He is the recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award from the National Mine Rescue Association and of the Robert Stefanko Distinguished Achievement Award in Mining Engineering from Pennsylvania State University. He holds a B.S. in mining engineering from Pennsylvania State University and an M.B.A. in manufacturing management from Washington University (St. Louis). SIAN L. BEILOCK is a professor of psychology at the University of Chicago. Her work focuses on the cognitive science behind performance under stress. She explores what happens in the brain and body when people are in pressure-filled situations and unable to make appropriate decisions or perform skills they have executed flawlessly in the past. Using her find- ings, she also develops practice strategies and psychological techniques to ensure optimal performance under stress. She is a recipient of the Spence Award for transformative early career contributions from the Association for Psychological Science. In addition to her scholarly publications, she is the author of a bestselling book, Choke: What the Secrets of the Brain Re- veal About Getting It Right When You Have To. She has a B.S. in cognitive science from the University of California, San Diego, and Ph.D.s in both kinesiology (sport psychology) and psychology (cognitive neuroscience) from Michigan State University. DAVID CLIFF is a professor of occupational health and safety in mining and director of the Minerals Industry Safety and Health Centre at the University of Queensland in Australia. Previously, he worked as manager of mining research and as manager of occupational hygiene, environment, and chemistry at the Safety in Mines Testing and Research Station of the Queensland government. His work has been devoted to the areas of health and safety to the mining industry with particular expertise in fatigue man- agement, occupational health and safety performance measurement, safety management systems, emergency preparedness, gas analysis, spontaneous combustion, fires, and explosions. He has attended or provided assistance in more than 30 mine emergencies. He has written on such topics as emer- gency management in underground coal mines, mine rescue guidelines, communications in difficult circumstances, and lessons from international mine safety incidents. He has an honors B.Sc. in chemistry from Monash University and a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Cambridge University.

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APPENDIX C 165 JAMES DEAN is director of the Mining and Industrial Extension Program in the College of Engineering and Mineral Resources at West Virginia Uni- versity. He previously worked as acting director of the West Virginia Office of Miners’ Health, Safety and Training following the Sago and Aracoma di- sasters in the state. In that position, his work included developing industry- wide consensus standards on requirements for self-contained self-rescuers (SCSRs), refuge chambers and mine communication, and tracking sys- tems, which provided the template for new federal regulations implemented through the MINER Act of 2006. He continues to serve by gubernatorial appointment on the West Virginia Mine Safety Technology Task Force. He is currently working on developing a a mobile SCSR training gallery for use at mine sites and a simulated underground mine for emergency response training for individual miners and mine emergency responders. He has a B.S. in mining engineering technology from Fairmont State College and an M.S. in mining engineering from West Virginia University. DAVID M. DeJOY is a professor emeritus in the College of Public Health and director emeritus in the work place health group of the Department of Public Health, both at the University of Georgia. His areas of specialty include worksite health promotion, occupational safety and health, behav- ioral theory, risk communication, and injury prevention and control. His research interests include creating healthy work organizations, workplace self-protective behavior, compliance with safe work practices, safety climate and organizational safety performance, and hazard and risk communica- tion. He has been active in the human factors community and served on the editorial boards of Safety Science, Journal of Safety Research, and the Jour- nal of Occupational Health Psychology. He has a Ph.D. in environment- behavior systems from Pennsylvania State University. ALBERT W. HOLLAND is a senior operational psychologist with the Behavioral Health and Performance Group (Operations) at the Johnson Space Center of the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). His general areas of expertise are selection, preparation, assess- ment, support, and repatriation of individuals and teams in a range of isolated, confined, and high-stress environments, such as space, subsea stations, and specialized military environments. Dr. Holland joined NASA in 1984. He founded the first operational psychology group at NASA, and he prototyped a number of psychological countermeasures for long- duration missions by using undersea stations and sealed life-support chambers. Dr. Holland was the lead psychologist in support of U.S. crew- members aboard the Russian Mir space station, and he spearheaded the design and implementation of U.S. methods that continue today. He led the design and implementation of psychological countermeasures for the

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166 IMPROVING SELF-ESCAPE FROM UNDERGROUND COAL MINES international space station and for the NASA Lunar-Mars Life Support Test Project. He was a member of the NASA team that advised the Chil- ean government on the rescue of the 33 miners trapped by the collapse of the San Jose Mine area. He has a Ph.D. in industrial/organizational psychology from Louisiana State University. DENNIS B. O’DELL is administrator for occupational health and safety at the United Mine Workers of America (UMWA) with responsibility for all UMWA health and safety operations for coal and noncoal members in the United States and Canada. Prior to this position, he was the international health and safety representative at UMWA, District 31, with responsibility for coordinating and conducting mine accident investigations. Previously, he was a working miner at Consolidation Coal Company Robinson Run Mine, where he also served as vice president and chair of safety for Local Union 1501. He currently serves as labor chair on the Joint Industry Com- mittee between the UMWA and the National Bituminous Coal Operators Association. He is also a classroom instructor for the training of miners at the National Mine Health and Safety Academy of Beckley, West Virginia, and has worked on numerous mine safety committees to improve safety and health in U.S. mines. He has certifications in many mine operations special- ties and is certified as a Mine Safety and Heath Administration instructor. JULIE ANNE SCHUCK is a senior program associate with the National Research Council (NRC) and has worked in the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education for more than 10 years. During that time, she has assisted a number of committees in various fields of study to prepare their technical reports. She has provided analytical and editorial support for a number of projects and workshops in the areas of science, technology, engineering, and math education; privacy and terrorism prevention; human- systems integration; and criminal justice. While serving on the Committee on Mine Safety: Essential Components of Self-Escape, she has also been part of the staff team supporting the NRC Committee on the Causes and Consequences of High Rates of Incarceration. She has a B.S. in engineer- ing physics from the University of California, San Diego, and an M.S. in education from Cornell University. TOBY WARDEN (Study Director) is the associate director of the Board on Human-Systems Integration of the National Research Council (NRC). She previously served as study director for The Effects of Commuting on Pilot Fatigue and, for two of NRC’s Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Cli- mate reports: Climate Stabilization Targets: Emissions, Concentrations, and Impacts Over Decades to Millennia and When Weather Matters: Science and Service to Meet Critical Societal Needs. Her doctoral research applied

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APPENDIX C 167 quantitative and qualitative methodologies to examine the rise of the U.S. Mayors Climate Protection Agreement. She has a B.A. in history, magna cum laude, and a Ph.D. in social ecology with an emphasis on environ- mental analysis and design, both from the University of California, Irvine. DAVID H. WEGMAN is a professor emeritus in the Department of Work Environment at the University of Massachusetts at Lowell, where he was the founding chair of the Department of Work Environment and dean of the School of Health and Environment. He is also an adjunct professor at the Harvard School of Public Health. His epidemiologic research includes study of acute and chronic occupational respiratory disease, occupational cancer risk, and occupational musculoskeletal disorders with special in- terests in study of subjective outcomes as early indicators of health ef- fects and surveillance of occupational conditions and risks. He chaired the Advisory Committee on the Elimination of Pneumoconiosis Among Coal Mine Workers of the Mine Safety and Health Administration; served on the Boards of Scientific Counselors for and the National Toxicology Program of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health; and on the Science Advisory Board of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. He also served as chair of the International Evaluation Group for an analysis of occupational health research in Sweden at the request of the Swedish parliament. He has a B.A. from Swarthmore College and both an M.D. and an M.Sc. from Harvard University.

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