C

Committee Biographies

Alan I. Leshner, Ph.D. (Chair), is chief executive officer of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and executive publisher of the journal Science, a post he has held since December 2001. From 1994 to 2001, Dr. Leshner was director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse at the National Institutes of Health. Prior to that, Dr. Leshner was the deputy director and acting director of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). He went to NIMH from the National Science Foundation, where he held a variety of senior positions, focusing on basic research in the biological, behavioral, and social sciences; science policy; and science education. Dr. Leshner is an elected fellow of AAAS, the National Academy of Public Administration, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and many other professional societies. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences and served on its governing council. He was appointed to the National Science Board by President George W. Bush in 2004 and reappointed by President Obama in 2011. Dr. Leshner received an undergraduate degree in psychology from Franklin and Marshall College and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in physiological psychology from Rutgers University. He has been awarded six honorary doctor of science degrees.

Louis Arcangeli, M.Ed., is currently a part-time instructor in the department of criminal justice at Georgia State University, a position he has held since 2003. Mr. Arcangeli is retired from the Atlanta Police Department (APD), where his 33 years of service included 5 years as a deputy chief of police and 7 years as an elected pension fund trustee. While with the department, Mr. Arcangeli served as the deputy chief of APD planning for the 1996 Olympic Games and the implementation of a new



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C Committee Biographies Alan I. Leshner, Ph.D. (Chair), is chief executive officer of the Ameri- can Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and executive publisher of the journal Science, a post he has held since December 2001. From 1994 to 2001, Dr. Leshner was director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse at the National Institutes of Health. Prior to that, Dr. Leshner was the deputy director and acting director of the National Insti- tute of Mental Health (NIMH). He went to NIMH from the National Sci- ence Foundation, where he held a variety of senior positions, focusing on basic research in the biological, behavioral, and social sciences; science policy; and science education. Dr. Leshner is an elected fellow of AAAS, the National Academy of Public Administration, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and many other professional societies. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences and served on its governing council. He was appointed to the National Science Board by President George W. Bush in 2004 and reappointed by President Obama in 2011. Dr. Leshner received an undergraduate degree in psychology from Franklin and Marshall College and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in physiological psychology from Rutgers University. He has been awarded six honorary doctor of science degrees. Louis Arcangeli, M.Ed., is currently a part-time instructor in the de- partment of criminal justice at Georgia State University, a position he has held since 2003. Mr. Arcangeli is retired from the Atlanta Police De- partment (APD), where his 33 years of service included 5 years as a dep- uty chief of police and 7 years as an elected pension fund trustee. While with the department, Mr. Arcangeli served as the deputy chief of APD planning for the 1996 Olympic Games and the implementation of a new 101

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102 RESEARCH TO REDUCE THE THREAT OF FIREARM-RELATED VIOLENCE E-911 Center and APD communications system. He has been a police instructor for the Georgia Public Safety Training Center and a Hunter Safety Instructor for the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Wildlife Management Division. Mr. Arcangeli is a graduate of the Fed- eral Bureau of Investigation National Academy and holds a master’s de- gree in education from Georgia State University. Alfred Blumstein, Ph.D., is university professor and J. Erik Jonsson Professor of Urban Systems and Operations Research in the H. John Heinz III College of Public Policy and Information Systems at Carnegie Mellon University. Before joining Heinz in 1969, Dr. Blumstein was at the Institute for Defense Analyses, where he was director of the Office of Urban Research and a member of the Research Council. He also served as the director of the Science and Technology Task Force for the Presi- dent’s Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice. Dr. Blumstein was a member of the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Research on Law Enforcement and the Administration of Justice from its founding in 1975 until 1986, serving as chairman from 1979 to 1984. He also served from 1979 to 1990 as chairman of the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency, the state’s crimi- nal justice planning agency, and as a member of the Pennsylvania Com- mission on Sentencing from 1986 to 1996. Dr. Blumstein’s research during the past 20 years has covered many aspects of criminal justice phenomena and policy, including crime measurement, criminal careers, sentencing, deterrence and incapacitation, prison populations, flow through the system, demographic trends, juvenile violence, and drug- enforcement policy. Dr. Blumstein has also served as director of the Na- tional Consortium on Violence Research. He was appointed in 2012 as chair of the Science Advisory Board for the Office of Justice Programs in the U.S. Department of Justice. Dr. Blumstein was a 2007 recipient of the Stockholm Prize in Criminology. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Dr. Blumstein received a bachelor’s degree in engineering physics and a Ph.D. in operations research from Cornell University. C. Hendricks Brown, Ph.D., is a professor of epidemiology and public health in the Miller School of Medicine at the University of Miami. He also holds adjunct professor positions in the departments of biostatistics and mental health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. In addition, he is a senior research scholar at the American Insti-

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APPENDIX C 103 tutes for Research and a collaborating senior scientist at the Oregon Cen- ter for Research to Practice. As director of the Prevention Science and Methodology Group, Dr. Brown leads a national network of 120 scien- tists and methodologists who are working on the design of preventive field trials and their analysis, particularly with advanced techniques for growth analysis and missing data. He is also the co-director of the multi- site Center for Integrating Education and Prevention in Schools. Dr. Brown previously served as distinguished university health professor in the department of epidemiology and biostatistics in the College of Public Health at the University of South Florida. Recently, his work has focused on the prevention of serious mental disorders such as schizophrenia and the prevention of suicide. Funding from National Institute of Mental Health supports his research to evaluate the impact of antidepressants on suicide using multiple datasets. Dr. Brown has chaired or co-chaired a number of international meetings related to synthesizing the evidence of prevention studies and serves on numerous federal panels, advisory boards, and editorial boards. He completed his undergraduate work at Vanderbilt University and received an M.A. in chemistry and a Ph.D. in statistics from the University of Chicago. Donald Carlucci, Ph.D., is the U.S. Army senior scientist for computa- tional structural modeling at the U.S. Army Armament, Research, De- velopment and Engineering Center, Picatinny Arsenal, where he has been employed since 1989. He was formerly chief of the Analysis and Evaluation Technology Division, Fuze and Precision Munitions Technology Directorate, responsible for the modeling and evaluation of cannon-launched munitions programs at Picatinny, and chief scientist for the XM982 Excalibur guided projectile. He also teaches graduate classes at Stevens Institute of Technology on Interior, Exterior and Terminal Ballistics as well as undergraduate classes on engineering design. Dr. Carlucci formerly held the position of development program officer (chief engineer) for Sense and Destroy Armor (SADARM). Prior to em- ployment at Picatinny, he was a design engineer for Titanium Industries in Fairfield, New Jersey, and held positions as chief engineer, quality assurance manager, and purchasing manager for Hoyt Corporation, lo- cated in Englewood, New Jersey. He is a licensed professional engineer in the states of New Jersey and New York. He earned a doctorate in me- chanical engineering and a master’s degree in engineering (mechanical) from Stevens Institute of Technology and a bachelor of science degree in mechanical engineering from the New Jersey Institute of Technology.

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104 RESEARCH TO REDUCE THE THREAT OF FIREARM-RELATED VIOLENCE BG (Ret.) Rhonda Cornum, M.D., Ph.D., is director of health strategy at TechWerks and a private consultant for resilience building within large organizations. She previously served as the first director of the U.S. Army’s novel Comprehensive Soldier Fitness initiative. Before that, she served as assistant surgeon general for force projection. In this capacity, she was responsible for policies and procedures to prepare soldiers and units for deployment. She commanded the Landstuhl Regional Medical Center, which is the evacuation hub for Iraq, Afghanistan, Africa, and Europe, during the height of the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts. Dr. Cornum sits on numerous committees and advisory boards, including the Advisory Committee on Former Prisoners of War for the Department of Veterans Affairs and the External Advisory Board for the Millennium Cohort Study. Dr. Cornum is board-certified in urology, a fellow of both the American College of Surgeons and the Aerospace Medical Associa- tion, a member of the American Society of Nutrition, and an adjunct pro- fessor at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. Her decorations include the Distinguished Service Medal, Legion of Merit, Distinguished Flying Cross, Bronze Star, Meritorious Service Medal (with four oak leaf clusters), Purple Heart, Air Medal, and Prisoner of War Medal. She received her Ph.D. in biochemistry and nutrition from Cornell University and an M.D. from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. Paul K. Halverson, Dr.P.H., M.H.S.A., F.A.C.H.E., is the founding dean at the Indiana University Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health. He previously served as the director of health and state health officer of the Arkansas Department of Health and as the secretary of the Arkansas State Board of Health. He was a professor of public health and medicine at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and an ad- junct professor of public health at the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill. Dr. Halverson is also past president of the Associ- ation of State and Territorial Health Officials as well as past chair of the Public Health Accreditation Board. Prior to his move to Arkansas, Dr. Halverson served as a member of the Senior Biomedical Research Service at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). As the director of the Division of Public Health Systems Development and Research, Dr. Halverson had responsibility for strengthening the effec- tiveness of public health systems throughout the world. Prior to his appointment at CDC, Professor Halverson was a member of the faculty in the Department of Health Policy and Administration at the University

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APPENDIX C 105 of North Carolina School of Public Health. Prior to his appointment at UNC, Dr. Halverson served as a hospital administrator in Arizona, Min- nesota, and Michigan. He earned a master’s in health services admin- istration from Arizona State University and a doctor of public health in health policy and administration from UNC at Chapel Hill. Stephen W. Hargarten, M.D., M.P.H., is professor and chair of the department of emergency medicine, associate dean for the global health program, and director of the Injury Research Center at the Medical Col- lege of Wisconsin. He is also a member of the Injury Research Center’s Education Core, which is focused on the development of a model injury prevention and control curriculum integrated across all 4 years of the medical student curriculum and the development of targeted injury pre- vention and control research training initiatives for medical and graduate students to prepare the next generation of injury research scientists. His research interests reflect an intersection of injury prevention and health policy to address the burden of injuries. Dr. Hargarten was the first chair of the statewide Committee on Trauma System Development for the Wisconsin State Health Department. He also served as chair of the Wis- consin Seat Belt Coalition and devoted considerable effort toward seat belt legislation in Wisconsin. He serves as a board member for Advo- cates of Highway and Auto Safety and the Association for Safe Interna- tional Road Travel. He was the founding president of the Society for the Advancement of Violence and Injury Research. Dr. Hargarten received his M.D. from the Medical College of Wisconsin and an M.P.H. from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Ronald C. Kessler, Ph.D., is the McNeil Family Professor of Health Care Policy at Harvard Medical School, where he has served on the fac- ulty since 1994. Prior to his most recent position, he was a professor of sociology and a program director at the University of Michigan’s Insti- tute for Social Research. Dr. Kessler is the principal investigator of the U.S. National Comorbidity Survey, the first nationally representative survey of the prevalence and correlates of mental disorders in the United States, and a co-director of the World Health Organization’s World Men- tal Health Survey Initiative, a series of comparative community epidemi- ological surveys of the prevalence and correlates of mental disorders and treatment for those disorders in 28 countries around the world. He is also the principal investigator of the Harvard Medical School site for Army STARRS (Study To Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers), a

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106 RESEARCH TO REDUCE THE THREAT OF FIREARM-RELATED VIOLENCE research program funded by the U.S. Army and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) to study risk and protective factors for suicide among Army personnel. Dr. Kessler’s research deals broadly with the social determinants of mental health and illness as studied from an epi- demiological perspective. He is the author of more than 600 publications and the recipient of many awards for his research, including the Senior Scientist and MERIT awards from NIMH. He is a member of both the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Kessler earned his Ph.D. in sociology from New York University and completed a postdoctoral fellowship in psychiatric epidemiology at the University of Wisconsin. Gary Kleck, Ph.D., is the David J. Bordua Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice and a courtesy professor of law at the Florida State Uni- versity, where he has been on the faculty since 1978. Dr. Kleck’s re- search interests are in gun control, deterrence, crime control, and the study of violence. He is the winner of the 1993 Michael J. Hindelang Award, bestowed by the American Society of Criminology, which named his book Point Blank: Guns and Violence in America “the most outstanding contribution to criminology.” Dr. Kleck’s subsequent work Armed: New Perspectives on Gun Control was featured in the Choice: Current Reviews for Academic Librarians 39th annual Outstanding Aca- demic Title List, which recognizes books for “excellence in scholarship and presentation, the significance of their contribution to their field, and their value as an important treatment of their topic.” Dr. Kleck is a mem- ber of the American Society of Criminology and the Academy of Crimi- nal Justice Sciences. He earned his B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. John A. Rich, M.D., M.P.H., is professor and chair of health manage- ment and policy at the Drexel University School of Public Health. He is also the director of the Center for Nonviolence and Justice at Drexel. His work has focused on African American men in urban settings. In 2006, Dr. Rich was granted a MacArthur Fellowship for his work to design “new models of health care that stretch across the boundaries of public health, education, social service, and justice systems to engage young men in caring for themselves and their peers.” Prior to arriving at Drexel University, Dr. Rich served as the medical director of the Boston Public Health Commission. As a primary care doctor at Boston Medical Center, he created the Young Men’s Health Clinic and initiated the Boston

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APPENDIX C 107 HealthCREW, a program to train inner-city young men to become peer health educators. He published a book about urban violence titled Wrong Place, Wrong Time: Trauma and Violence in the Lives of Young Black Men (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009). In 2009, Dr. Rich was in- ducted into the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences. He earned his A.B. degree in English from Dartmouth College, his M.D. from Duke University School of Medicine, and his M.P.H. from the Har- vard School of Public Health. Jeffrey W. Runge, M.D., is a principal at The Chertoff Group, a firm providing business risk management and security sector advisory ser- vices, and president of Biologue, Inc., a consulting firm specializing in biodefense, medical preparedness, and injury prevention and control. He is also an adjunct professor in the School of Medicine at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. From 2005 to 2008, Dr. Runge served as the Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS’s) first chief medical officer and led the reorganization of biodefense operations into a new Office of Health Affairs (OHA). OHA acts as the principal adviser to all DHS component agencies on medical, biodefense, and workforce health issues. From 1984 to 2001, Dr. Runge practiced and taught emergency medicine in a North Carolina emergency department and trauma center and researched injury prevention, trauma care, and emergency service delivery. His leadership and innovation in road traffic safety brought him to Washington, DC, as the head of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, where he instituted programs that led to the first absolute declines in U.S. motor vehicle deaths in almost a decade and the lowest highway fatality rate in history. Dr. Runge is board-certified in emergen- cy medicine and has published more than 60 articles in medical literature in the fields of emergency medicine, traffic injury control, and medical preparedness. Dr. Runge is a graduate of the University of the South in Sewanee, Tennessee, and received his medical degree from the Medical University of South Carolina. Susan B. Sorenson, Ph.D., is professor of social policy and practice and professor of health and societies at the University of Pennsylvania. She is a senior fellow with the Center for Public Health Initiatives and the director of the Evelyn Jacobs Ortner Center on Family Violence. She previously taught and conducted research for 20 years at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), School of Public Health. Dr. Sorenson has published widely on the epidemiology and prevention of

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108 RESEARCH TO REDUCE THE THREAT OF FIREARM-RELATED VIOLENCE violence, including the areas of homicide, suicide, sexual assault, child abuse, battering, and firearms. A primary focus of her work is the social context in which violence occurs, specifically, the norms that shape whether and how violence is tolerated. In addition to her academic work, Dr. Sorenson has served on the board of directors and advisory boards of local community-based organizations, state government agencies, and university injury prevention centers. In 1991, she co-founded the Vio- lence Prevention Coalition of Greater Los Angeles. She was a consultant to President Clinton’s National Advisory Council on Violence Against Women; a consultant to the United Nations Children’s Fund May 2000 report Domestic Violence Against Women and Girls; and a member of the advisory panel for the 2001 U.S. Surgeon General’s Report on Youth Violence. She is the author of a 2008 World Health Organization report on health indicators of violence against children in low- and middle- income countries. Dr. Sorenson earned a B.S. in sociology and psycholo- gy from the Iowa State University, an M.S. in psychology from the Illi- nois Institute of Technology, and a Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Cincinnati. Dr. Sorenson completed a postdoctoral fellow- ship at the UCLA School of Public Health. David Vlahov, Ph.D., R.N., FAAN, is dean and professor at the Univer- sity of California, San Francisco, School of Nursing. He previously served as professor of epidemiology at Johns Hopkins University and Columbia University and held adjunct positions at the New York Univer- sity (NYU) College of Nursing and at the medical schools of Cornell, Mount Sinai, and NYU. He also served as co-director of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Health and Society Scholars program. Dr. Vlahov’s research interests are in epidemiology, infectious diseases, sub- stance abuse, and mental health. He has conducted studies of urban populations in Baltimore for more than 20 years and has led epidemio- logical studies in Harlem and the Bronx that have served as a platform for subsequent individual- and community-level intervention studies and community-based participatory research to address social determinants of health. Dr. Vlahov established the International Society for Urban Health, serving as its first president, and also served on the New York City Board of Health. He was a visiting professor at the Medical School in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, developing its programs in urban health, and an expert consultant to the World Health Organization’s Urban Health Center in Kobe, Japan. Dr. Vlahov is the editor-in-chief of the Journal of Urban Health, has edited 3 books on urban health, and has published

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APPENDIX C 109 more than 610 scholarly papers. He received his baccalaureate in history from Earlham College, his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in nursing from the University of Maryland, and his doctorate in epidemiology from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

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