Appendix A

Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

LTG Henry J. Hatch (Chair) has been an active volunteer with the National Research Council and several professional societies for the past 12 years. As an officer in the U.S. Army, he was the commanding general of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers from 1988 to 1992. His missions included military construction and environmental engineering for the Army and Air Force and the Army’s civil water resources program. After graduating from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, he completed airborne and ranger training and earned a master’s degree in geodetic science at the Ohio State University. General Hatch held combat engineer leadership positions in airborne and air assault units early in his Army career and commanded the 326th Engineer Battalion of the 101st Airborne Division in Vietnam. He was the Director of Combat Developments at the Army Engineer School. He oversaw military research, development, acquisition and civil construction as district engineer for the Corps of Engineers Nashville District and later as the division engineer for the Pacific Ocean Division before becoming the U.S. Army Chief of Engineers.

After retirement, General Hatch was the president and chief executive officer of Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc., leading a $9 billion DOE environmental cleanup effort at the DOE Hanford site in Washington state. He also served as the chief operating officer of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) and was the chairman of the Law Companies Group, Inc., an international engineering and environmental services company. General Hatch is a registered professional engineer in the District of Columbia, a fellow of the Society of American Military Engineers, distinguished member of the American Society of Civil Engineers, and a member of the National Society of Professional Engineers, Tau Beta Pi, and Phi Kappa Phi.

W. Peter Cherry (NAE) is an independent consultant who recently retired as the chief analyst for the U.S. Army Future Combat Systems Program at Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). He was responsible for analytic support to requirements analysis, performance assessment, and design trades.

Previously, Dr. Cherry was leader of the Integrated Simulation and Test Integrated Process Team, focusing on test and evaluation planning, the development of associated models and simulations, and the development of the Future Combat System of Systems Integration Laboratory. He has been a participant in the Future Combat Systems program since its inception, leading analysis and evaluation of concepts as a member of the Full Spectrum Team in the contract activities which preceded concept and technology development.



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Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members LTG Henry J. Hatch (Chair) has been an active volunteer with the National Research Council and several professional societies for the past 12 years. As an officer in the U.S. Army, he was the commanding general of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers from 1988 to 1992. His missions included military construction and environmental engineering for the Army and Air Force and the Army’s civil water resources program. After graduating from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, he completed airborne and ranger training and earned a master’s degree in geodetic science at the Ohio State University. General Hatch held combat engineer leadership positions in airborne and air assault units early in his Army career and commanded the 326th Engineer Battalion of the 101st Airborne Division in Vietnam. He was the Director of Combat Developments at the Army Engineer School. He oversaw military research, development, acquisition and civil construction as district engineer for the Corps of Engineers Nashville District and later as the division engineer for the Pacific Ocean Division before becoming the U.S. Army Chief of Engineers. After retirement, General Hatch was the president and chief executive officer of Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc., leading a $9 billion DOE environmental cleanup effort at the DOE Hanford site in Washington state. He also served as the chief operating officer of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) and was the chairman of the Law Companies Group, Inc., an international engineering and environmental services company. General Hatch is a registered professional engineer in the District of Columbia, a fellow of the Society of American Military Engineers, distinguished member of the American Society of Civil Engineers, and a member of the National Society of Professional Engineers, Tau Beta Pi, and Phi Kappa Phi. W. Peter Cherry (NAE) is an independent consultant who recently retired as the chief analyst for the U.S. Army Future Combat Systems Program at Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). He was responsible for analytic support to requirements analysis, performance assessment, and design trades. Previously, Dr. Cherry was leader of the Integrated Simulation and Test Integrated Process Team, focusing on test and evaluation planning, the development of associated models and simulations, and the development of the Future Combat System of Systems Integration Laboratory. He has been a participant in the Future Combat Systems program since its inception, leading analysis and evaluation of concepts as a member of the Full Spectrum Team in the contract activities which preceded concept and technology development. 131

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MAKING THE SOLDIER DECISIVE ON FUTURE BATTLEFIELDS Before joining SAIC, he spent over 30 years with Vector Research Incorporated and its successor, the Altarum Institute. His professional career began in the field of maritime operations research in the Department of National Defence in Canada. He left that organization to obtain a Ph.D. in operations research at the University of Michigan, where he specialized in stochastic processes. Since the completion of his studies at the University of Michigan, he has focused on the development and application of operations research in the national security domain, primarily in the field of land combat. He contributed to the development and fielding of most of the major systems currently employed by the Army, from the Patriot missile system to the Apache helicopter, as well as the command control and intelligence systems currently in use such as ASAS and AFTAADS. In addition, he contributed to the creation of the Army’s Manpower Personnel and Human Factors and Training Program (MANPRINT) and to the Army’s Embedded Training Initiative. His recent research interests include peacekeeping operations and the development of transformational organizations and material. Dr. Cherry received a B.A. in mathematics from the University of New Brunswick; an M.A. in mathematics from the University of Toronto; and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in industrial engineering from the University of Michigan. Paul W. Glimcher is professor of neural sciences, economics and psychology at the New York University (NYU) Center for Neural Science and director of the university’s Center for Neuroeconomics. He has achieved the following: A.B. – Princeton University, magna cum laude; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, Neuroscience; fellow of McKnight, Whitehall, Klingenstein and McDonnell Foundations. He is also investigator of the National Eye Institute, the National Institute of Mental Health, and the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, founding president of the Society for Neuroeconomics, winner of the Margaret and Herman Sokol Faculty Award in the Sciences, 2003, and the winner of the NYU Distinguished (Lifetime Accomplishment) Teaching Award, 2006. He has been published in Nature, Science, Neuron Journal of Neurophysiology, American Economic Review, Games and Economic Behavior, Vision Research, Experimental Brain Research, and the MIT Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. He is the author of Decisions, Uncertainty and, the Brain: The Science of Neuroeconomics and the winner of the American Association of Publishers Medical Sciences Book of the Year, 2003. Professor Glimcher’s work has been covered by the Wall Street Journal, Time, Newsweek, The Los Angeles Times, Money Magazine, and New Scientist, and he has been heard on National Public Radio, the BBC and Fox News, among others. Randal W. Hill, Jr. is the executive director for the University of Southern California (USC) Institute for Creative Technologies (ICT) and a research professor in computer science. While at ICT, he has been the director of applied research and transition, the deputy director of technology, and senior scientist. Previously, Dr. Hill was project leader and research scientist at USC’s Information Sciences Institute and also held the positions of task manager, technical group leader and member of the technical staff at the California Institute of Technology Jet Propulsion Laboratory. He is a member of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI) and the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Dr. Hill served in the U.S. Army as a commissioned field artillery/military intelligence officer 132

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APPENDIX A and was honorably discharged as captain in 1984. He received a B.S. from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point and an M.S. and Ph.D. in computer science from USC. Robin L. Keesee is an independent consultant. A recently retired federal civil servant, he was vice director of the Joint IED Defeat Organization. As second-in-charge under senior general officers, he helped oversee the execution of the $3 billion to $4 billion per year mission. His emphasis was on the materiel initiatives, seeking technology and other countermeasures to IEDs drawing from across the Service and DOE labs, universities, defense contractors, and DARPA. Earlier, Dr. Keesee had been the first deputy to the commanding general of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Md., director of human research and engineering in the Army Research Laboratory, also at APG, and director of the Systems Research Laboratory of the Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences, Alexandria, Va. Dr. Keesee earned a B.S. in industrial engineering and a Ph.D. in human factors from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Elliott D. Kieff (NAS/IOM) is the Albee Professor of Medicine and Microbiology and Molecular Genetics at the Channing Laboratory at Harvard University. Dr. Kieff has also held many distinguished academic positions at Harvard and the University of Chicago. He is the director of Infectious Diseases at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital, the recipient of many honors from the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and holds several patents, including a vaccine against the Epstein-Barr virus. Dr. Kieff received a B.A. in chemistry from the University of Pennsylvania, a Ph.D. in microbiology from the University of Chicago, and an M.D. from Johns Hopkins University. Jean MacMillan is the chief scientist of Aptima, Inc. She is a leading expert in understanding, maximizing, and assessing human performance in complex sociotechnical systems. Her 30-year career has spanned a broad range of accomplishments in simulation-based training, human- machine interaction, and user-centered system design. Dr. MacMillan’s current research focuses on methods to increase the effectiveness of simulation-based training by linking training objectives to scenario design elements and performance measures. She recently led projects to develop reliable and valid performance measures for teams of F-16 pilots training in a distributed simulation facility and to design synthetic entities that function as team members for simulation- based training of teamwork skills. Before joining Aptima in 1997, Dr. MacMillan was a senior scientist at BBN Technologies and a senior cognitive systems engineer at Alphatech (now BAE Systems). She is a frequent contributor and strategic advisor to workshops and expert panels on human engineering issues for organizations such as DARPA and the military services. Dr. MacMillan recently co-chaired a 3-year National Research Council study on military needs for social and organizational models, which resulted in the publication of Behavioral Modeling and Simulation: From Individuals to Societies. 133

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MAKING THE SOLDIER DECISIVE ON FUTURE BATTLEFIELDS Dr. MacMillan received a B.A. from Antioch College, an M.C.P. from Harvard University, and a Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from Harvard University. She is currently a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Cognitive Engineering and Decision Making and is associate editor for cognitive systems engineering for the on-line journal Cognitive Technology. William L. Melvin is the director of the Sensors and Electromagnetic Applications Laboratory (SEAL) at the Georgia Tech Research Institute and an adjunct professor in Georgia Tech’s Electrical and Computer Engineering Department. He has successfully developed and fostered major research thrusts within Georgia Tech centered on systems engineering, advanced signal processing, and high-fidelity modeling and simulation. His specific expertise includes digital signal processing with application to RF sensors, including adaptive signal processing for aerospace radar detection of airborne and ground moving targets, radar applications of detection and estimation theory, electronic protection, SIGINT, and synthetic aperture radar. He has authored over 150 articles in his areas of expertise and holds three patents on adaptive radar technology. As director of SEAL, Dr. Melvin focuses a technology portfolio in excess of $36 million per year involving all aspects of sensor systems engineering, including: environmental characterization; antenna development; hardware and software design, implementation, test, and evaluation; advanced system concepts; signal processing; physics-based modeling and simulation; and field testing. Areas of recent special interest include deploying SAR-GMTI sensors on small UAVs; space-radar algorithm development and processing techniques; dismount detection and urban radar; multistatics; electronic protection; integrated air and missile defense; and, expeditionary force intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance. Dr. Melvin is a fellow of the IEEE, with the following citation: “For contributions to adaptive signal processing methods in radar systems.” He has served as a guest editor for several recent special sections appearing in the IEEE Transactions on Aerospace and Electronic Systems and acted as the technical co-chair of the 2001 IEEE Radar Conference and the 2004 IEEE Southeastern Symposium on System Theory. Dr. Melvin received a “Best Paper” award at the 1997 IEEE Radar Conference. He has provided tutorials and invited talks at a number of IEEE conferences and local IEEE section meetings, and he is a regular reviewer for several IEEE and IET journal publications. Dr. Melvin is the recent recipient of the 2006 IEEE AESS Young Engineer of the Year Award, the 2003 U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory Reservist of the Year Award, and the 2002 U.S. Air Force Materiel Command Engineering and Technical Management Reservist of the Year Award. Dr. Melvin received a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Lehigh University in 1994, as well as MSEE and BSEE degrees (with high honors) from this same institution in 1992 and 1989, respectively. Maj Gen Richard R. Paul, U.S. Air Force (ret.), is an independent consultant. He retired from the Boeing Company in 2007. Prior to Boeing, General Paul served 33 years in the U.S. Air Force, retiring in 2000. During his 7-year Boeing career, General Paul served as a vice president in the Phantom Works, Boeing’s centralized research and development organization that develops advanced 134

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APPENDIX A technologies for Boeing’s family of commercial aircraft and defense-related aerospace products and services. In 2006 and 2007, he concurrently served in the Office of the Chief Technology Officer (CTO), where his duties included executive management of Boeing’s 2,000-person Technical Fellowship program and its External Technical Affiliations program, which served as the Boeing interface to dozens of professional societies. During his 33-year Air Force career, General Paul served in three Air Force laboratories in New Mexico and Ohio; a product center in Massachusetts; two major command headquarters, in Nebraska and Ohio; Headquarters of the U.S. Air Force in the Pentagon; and a joint staff assignment in Nebraska. His assignments during the latter one-third of his career were aligned with the Air Force science and technology enterprise, where he served in his final assignment as the commander of the Air Force Research Laboratory headquartered in Dayton, Ohio. Gen. Paul received a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from the University of Missouri at Rolla (UMR) and a master’s degree in electrical engineering from the Air Force Institute of Technology, and has been awarded a professional degree in electrical engineering by UMR. He is a distinguished graduate of the Air Command and Staff College at Maxwell Air Force Base in Alabama and the Naval War College at Newport, Rhode Island, and is a graduate of the Defense Systems Management College Program Management Course at Fort Belvoir, Virginia. Richard Pew is a principal scientist at Raytheon BBN Technologies since 1976. At BBN Technologies Dr. Pew has been continuously involved in the analysis, design, and evaluation of systems in which human performance is a critical component. He has conducted studies of improved means of introducing human factors requirements in preliminary design. He has developed specific design recommendations for improved human interfaces in systems to be used by individuals with no knowledge of computers. He has also participated in experimental studies measuring human performance in computer-based systems. In addition, Dr. Pew has led and contributed to projects concerned with modeling and predicting human performance in applied settings. He has conducted studies concerned with understanding human performance and decision making and has continued his interests in human information processing. Previously, Dr. Pew was a professor, associate professor, assistant professor and associate research psychologist and lecturer at the University of Michigan. His research at the university focused on basic and applied studies of human performance, including human information processing, perceptual motor performance, and the analysis and synthesis of manual control systems. In addition to his own work, he served as chairman or co-chairman of 15 Ph.D theses in these areas. From 1965 to 1998, he has served annually as course chairman for the University of Michigan Engineering Summer Conference on Human Factors Engineering. He continues to lecture in the course. Dr. Pew received a B.E.E. (electrical engineering) from Cornell University; an M.A. (psychology) from Harvard University; and a Ph.D. (psychology) from the University of Michigan. M. Frank Rose is the chief technical officer for Radiance Technologies, Inc. Previously, he was the vice president for research. Prior to joining Radiance Technologies, he was director of the Science Directorate at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Previous positions within the 135

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MAKING THE SOLDIER DECISIVE ON FUTURE BATTLEFIELDS scientific community were as deputy director, Space Sciences Laboratory, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center; director, Space Power Institute, and professor, electrical engineering, Auburn University; and senior research scientist, Naval Surface Warfare Center. He has had a distinguished career involving progressively more responsible experience in performing and managing basic and applied research in the physical sciences and advanced technologies associated with space, shock wave physics, energy conversion, electronic warfare, directed energy technology, and space power technology. He has broad experience in planning, programming, coordinating, and implementing interdisciplinary R&D programs and he has international recognition in the field of advanced power technology and space environmental effects. He is a fellow of the IEEE, an associate fellow of the AIAA, and national associate of the National Academies. He was associate editor of the Journal of Propulsion and Power for 6 years and has been guest editor for several technical journals. He is the author/editor of five books, most dealing with high-power, high-speed phenomena; is the author of 160 technical papers in the open literature; and holds 12 patents, mostly in the area of advanced energy conversion. He is a past member of the NRC Board on Army Science and Technology and has participated in numerous BAST studies. He is a past member of the Scientific Advisory board for the Sandia National Laboratory. Dr. Rose holds a certificate in engineering in electrical engineering from the Clinch Valley College of the University of Virginia, a B.A. in physics from the University of Virginia, an M.Sc. in engineering physics, and a Ph.D. in engineering physics, from Pennsylvania State University. Albert A. Sciarretta is president of CNS Technologies, Inc. (CNSTI), a company that consults on research and development, experimentation, chemical/biological defense, counterinsurgency operations, modeling and simulation, program development/management, and the assessment of the military utility of advanced technologies. His current personal efforts within CNSTI include serving as a senior research fellow at the Center for Technology and National Security Policy, National Defense University; supporting the program manager, Test and Evaluation/Science and Technology (T&E/S&T) in the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD); and serving as an on- call subject matter expert for an Independent Review Team for assessing technology programs identified by the assistant secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics, and Technology (ASA[ALT]). He has served as chief designer and director of an Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) experiment involving networked sensors in support of small-unit urban operations; an OSD demonstration of an integrated live-virtual-constructive simulation-based joint urban operations training environment; a U.S. Army experiment for micro-autonomous robots; and multiple Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) experiments of sensor and command and control (C2) technologies. His primary focus has been on small-unit operations in urban environments. His current efforts include assessing technologies for enhancing Department of Defense test ranges; developing a methodology and metrics for assessing the readiness of transitioning control of Afghanistan provinces to Afghanistan’s central government; and designing and conducting an experiment for assessing the benefits of dynamic physical, information, and sociocognitive networks in small-unit dismounted operations. Mr. Sciarretta is a retired Army officer. He has a B.S. degree in general engineering from the U.S. Military Academy and dual M.S. degrees in mechanical engineering and operations 136

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APPENDIX A research from Stanford University. He previously served as a member of the National Research Council (NRC) Committee on Army Science and Technology for Homeland Defense: C4ISR; Army Unmanned Ground Vehicle Technology; Review of the Department of Defense Air and Space Systems Science and Technology Programs; and Advanced Energetic Materials and Manufacturing Technologies. Ann E. Speed is a principal member of the technical staff at Sandia National Laboratories. Her background is in cognitive psychology areas of memory, analogy, training, language acquisition, and operant mechanisms of behavior. She has been at Sandia with the Cognitive Systems team for 10 years. Dr. Speed has over 20 years’ experience conducting human subjects research and applying psychological principles to real-world problems. She has worked in areas as varied as combining synthetic perceptive systems with synthetic cognitive systems to enhance physical security, IED and terrorist network defeat, and computational models of group decisionmaking. Among other things, she is working on applying neurophysiological mechanisms of knowledge representation to computational modeling of human cognition in order to enable humanlike analogy making and learning in those computational models. Dr. Speed received a B.A. in psychology from the University of New Mexico, and an M.S. and Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from Louisiana State University. LTG Joseph Yakovac is president of JVM LLC, and joined the Cohen Group as a senior counselor in July, 2008. General Yakovac retired from the U.S. Army in 2007, concluding more than 35 years of military service. His last assignment was director of the Army Acquisition Corps and military deputy to the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics, and Technology. In those roles, he managed a dedicated team of military and civilian acquisition experts to make sure America’s soldiers received state-of-the-art critical systems and support across a full spectrum of Army operations. He also provided critical military insight to the Department of Defense senior civilian leadership on acquisition management, technological infrastructure development, and systems management. General Yakovac also served as the program executive officer, Ground Combat Systems, and deputy for Systems Management and Horizontal Technology Integration. After graduation from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, he was commissioned in the infantry. He served as a platoon leader, executive officer, company and battalion commander in mechanized infantry units. General Yakovac earned an M.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Colorado at Boulder before returning to West Point as an assistant professor. He is also a graduate of the Armor Officer Advanced Course, the Army Command and General Staff College, the Defense Systems Management College, and the Industrial College of the Armed Forces. He now teaches classes at the U.S. Military Academy, the Defense Management College, and the Naval Postgraduate School. 137

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