Appendix C


Biosketches of Committee Members

Anne C. Petersen, Ph.D., M.S. (Chair), is founder and president of Global Philanthropy Alliance, a foundation making grants in Africa. She also is research professor, Center for Human Growth and Development, and faculty associate, Center for Global Health, University of Michigan, among other affiliations at the university. Dr. Petersen serves on several voluntary boards or committees for government, foundations, and scientific or community-based organizations. She is co-chair of the Advisory Board for CALIT2, an organization created a decade ago to move information technology advances from the University of California system to industry in California. Dr. Petersen previously held positions as professor of psychology at Stanford University, deputy director of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, senior vice president for programs and corporate officer at the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, and department head and founding dean of the College of Health and Human Development at Penn State University. She was the first vice president for research at the University of Minnesota, as well as graduate dean and professor (Institute for Child Development and Department of Pediatrics). Previously, Dr. Petersen was University of Chicago faculty and associate director of the MacArthur Foundation Health Program. She has authored numerous articles and books. Her honors include election to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and fellow in several scientific societies, including the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and the American Psychological Association (APA) (three divisions), as well as founding fellow of the Association for Psychological Science (APS). She co-founded the Society of Research on Adolescence, was president of several scientific societies, and



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 421
Appendix C Biosketches of Committee Members Anne C. Petersen, Ph.D., M.S. (Chair), is founder and president of Global Philanthropy Alliance, a foundation making grants in Africa. She also is re- search professor, Center for Human Growth and Development, and faculty associate, Center for Global Health, University of Michigan, among other affiliations at the university. Dr. Petersen serves on several voluntary boards or committees for government, foundations, and scientific or community- based organizations. She is co-chair of the Advisory Board for CALIT2, an organization created a decade ago to move information technology advances from the University of California system to industry in Califor- nia. Dr. Petersen previously held positions as professor of psychology at Stanford University, deputy director of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, senior vice president for programs and corporate officer at the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, and department head and found- ing dean of the College of Health and Human Development at Penn State University. She was the first vice president for research at the University of Minnesota, as well as graduate dean and professor (Institute for Child Development and Department of Pediatrics). Previously, Dr. Petersen was University of Chicago faculty and associate director of the MacArthur Foundation Health Program. She has authored numerous articles and books. Her honors include election to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and fellow in several scientific societies, including the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and the American Psychological Association (APA) (three divisions), as well as founding fellow of the As- sociation for Psychological Science (APS). She co-founded the Society of Research on Adolescence, was president of several scientific societies, and 421

OCR for page 421
422 NEW DIRECTIONS IN CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT RESEARCH is past president of the International Society for the Study of Behavioral Development. Dr. Petersen received her B.A. in mathematics, her M.S. in statistics, and her Ph.D. in measurement, evaluation, and statistical analysis from the University of Chicago. Lucy Berliner, M.S.W., is director of the Harborview Center for Sexual Assault and Traumatic Stress and clinical associate professor at the Univer- sity of Washington School of Social Work, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. Her activities include clinical practice with child and adult victims of trauma and crime, research on the impact of trauma and the effectiveness of clinical and societal interventions, and participation in local and national social policy initiatives designed to promote the interests of trauma and crime victims. Ms. Berliner is on the editorial boards of lead- ing journals concerned with interpersonal violence; has authored numerous peer-reviewed articles and book chapters; and has served/serves on local and national boards of organizations, programs, and professional societies. She also served on the IOM-National Research Council (NRC) Workshop Committee on Child Maltreatment Research, Policy, and Practice for the Next Generation (Phase One) and the IOM Panel on Research on Violence Against Women. Ms. Berliner received her M.S.W. from the University of Washington. Linda Marie Burton, Ph.D., M.A., is James B. Duke professor of sociology and Center for Child and Family Policy (CCFP) faculty fellow at Duke Uni- versity. Her research is conceptually grounded in life-course, developmental, and ecological perspectives and focuses on three themes concerning the lives of America’s poorest urban, small town, and rural families: (1) intergenera- tional family structures, processes, and role transitions; (2) the meaning of context and place in the daily lives of families; and (3) childhood adultifi- cation and the accelerated life course. The comparative dimension of her research comprises in-depth within-group analysis of low-income African American, white, and Hispanic/Latino families, as well as systematic ex- amination of similarities and differences across groups. She is principally an ethnographer, but integrates survey and geographic and spatial analysis in her work. Dr. Burton was one of six principal investigators involved in a multisite, multimethod collaborative study of the impact of welfare reform on families and children (Welfare, Children, and Families: A Three-City Study). She also directed the ethnographic component of the Three-City Study and was principal investigator for an ethnographic study of rural poverty and child development (The Family Life Project). Dr. Burton re- ceived her Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Southern California.

OCR for page 421
APPENDIX C 423 Phaedra S. Corso, Ph.D., M.P.A., is professor of health policy in the College of Public Health at the University of Georgia (UGA). Her research interests include economic evaluation of public health interventions; quality-of-life assessment for vulnerable populations; evaluation of preferences for health risks; and the prevention of violence, injury, and substance use. Prior to joining the faculty at UGA, Dr. Corso worked for 15 years at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, most notably as an economic analyst in the area of violence prevention. She received her Ph.D. in health policy from Harvard University. Deborah Daro, Ph.D., M.C.P., is a senior research fellow at Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago. She has more than 30 years of experience in evaluating child abuse treatment and prevention programs and has directed some of the largest multisite program evaluations completed in the field. Currently, she is leading the development of the Doris Duke Fellowships for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect, whose aim is to identify and nurture promising leaders and innovative approaches to child abuse preven- tion. Most recently, Dr. Daro has focused on developing reform strategies that embed individualized, targeted prevention efforts within more univer- sal efforts to alter normative standards and community context. She is also examining strategies for creating more effective partnerships among public child welfare agencies, community-based prevention efforts, and informal support systems. Prior to joining Chapin Hall, Dr. Daro served as director of the National Center on Child Abuse Prevention Research, a program of the National Committee to Prevent Child Abuse. She has published and lectured widely, and her commentaries and findings are frequently cited in the rationale for numerous child abuse prevention and treatment reforms. She has served as president of the American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children and as treasurer and executive council member for the International Society for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect. Dr. Daro received her Ph.D. in social welfare and a master’s degree in city and regional planning from the University of California, Berkeley. Howard Davidson, J.D., is director of the American Bar Association’s (ABA’s) Center on Children and the Law. The center has been responsible for many nationwide activities of the ABA related to children and the legal system. Mr. Davidson directs a large staff of attorneys and social scientists engaged in consulting, technical assistance, training, and writing projects on many legal topics, which have included children in the courts; legal representation issues; children’s legal rights; child protection-related legislative reforms; parental rights and responsibility laws; domestic vio- lence and its impact on children; child sexual abuse; family preservation, foster care, and legal permanency; parental kidnapping of children; child

OCR for page 421
424 NEW DIRECTIONS IN CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT RESEARCH pornography and prostitution; adoption; legal planning for parents with HIV/AIDS; and a range of child/adolescent health law issues. Throughout his tenure, Mr. Davidson has provided consultation to courts, attorneys, organizations, and other professionals across the country on child welfare and child protection legal issues. He is on the board of the International Centre for Missing and Exploited Children and was appointed as a member of the U.S. Delegation, 1st World Congress Against the Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children. Mr. Davidson received his J.D. from Boston Col- lege Law School. Angela Díaz, M.D., M.P.H., is a professor in the Department of Pediatrics and Department of Preventive Medicine at Mount Sinai School of Medi- cine, where she is responsible for the Division of Adolescent Medicine. She is also director of the Mount Sinai Adolescent Health Center. Dr. Diaz served as a White House fellow in 1994-1995, examining health care poli- cies in the U.S. territories in the Pacific and the Caribbean. She has been involved in issues of international health, as well as advocacy issues and policy in the United States. Her research has covered adolescent sexual and reproductive health, childhood sexual victimization, and human papilloma virus (HPV). Dr. Diaz is a member of the IOM and has served on multiple committees. She received her M.D. from Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and her M.P.H. from Harvard University. Mary Dozier, Ph.D., is Unidel Amy E. du Pont Chair of Child Development at the University of Delaware. She is principal investigator for the school’s Infant Caregiver Project. Her interest in understanding connections among childhood experience, brain development, and behavior has led to the development of intervention techniques that are a practical application of findings from decades of research. Since 1994, Dr. Dozier has studied the development of young children who are neglected and in foster care and has developed training programs for the caregivers of these children, with efficacy trials funded by the National Institute of Mental Health. Her work has been supported by the National Institute of Mental Health continuously since 1989. She is the recipient of the Bowlby-Ainsworth Award for Trans- lational Research on Adoption and the National Institute of Mental Health Innovation Nomination. Dr. Dozier served on the IOM-NRC Workshop Committee on Child Maltreatment Research, Policy, and Practice for the Next Generation (Phase One). She received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Duke University. Fernando A. Guerra, M.D., M.P.H., is clinical professor of pediatrics at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio. He also serves as an adjunct professor in public health at the Air Force School of

OCR for page 421
APPENDIX C 425 Aerospace Medicine at Brooks Air Force Base in San Antonio and in man- agement, policy, and community health at the University of Texas School of Public Health in Houston. He recently retired as director of health for the San Antonio Metropolitan Health District after 23 years of service. He oversaw the operation of 32 health locations throughout San Antonio and several areas of Bexar County. Dr. Guerra has held top leadership posi- tions in local, regional, and national organizations that include serving as a member of the Federal Advisory Committee for the National Children’s Study. He has received numerous awards for his service and contributions to public health, including the Job Lewis Smith Award of the American Academy of Pediatrics and most recently the Alumni Award of Merit from the Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Guerra is currently serving as a consultant to the Public Health Department of the City of San Antonio in public health and health policy. He is a member of the IOM, the Public Health Accreditation Board, and the Urban Institute Board of Trustees. Dr. Guerra earned his M.D. from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston and his M.P.H. from the Harvard University School of Public Health, where he was also a Kellogg fellow. Carol Hafford, Ph.D., is a principal research scientist at NORC at the University of Chicago in the Economics, Labor, and Population Studies department. She leads federally sponsored studies on human services for vulnerable children and families that address housing needs, food secu- rity, self-sufficiency, and child maltreatment and elder abuse prevention interventions. Prior to joining NORC in 2010, Dr. Hafford was a senior research associate at James Bell Associates in the child welfare practice area. There, she conducted studies on evidence-based child neglect preven- tion, implementation of tribal family preservation programs, foster care and adoption services, court–child welfare–community collaborations for infants and toddlers in foster care, independent living for emancipated youth, family dependency court reforms, tribal TANF and Indian child welfare coordination, organizational and systems change across state and tribal family services, implementation of federal child welfare legislation, and monitoring of state child welfare systems through the Child and Fam- ily Services Reviews. A fellow of the Society for Applied Anthropology, Dr. Hafford has conducted longitudinal ethnographic research on runaway and homeless youth in transitional living programs and the socialization of the children of immigrants into local and transnational social support networks. She is the author of Sibling Caretaking in Immigrant Families: Understanding Cultural Practices to Inform Child Welfare Practice and Evaluation. Dr. Hafford earned her Ph.D. in applied anthropology from Columbia University.

OCR for page 421
426 NEW DIRECTIONS IN CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT RESEARCH Charles A. Nelson, Ph.D., is professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and Richard David Scott chair in pediatric developmental medicine research at Children’s Hospital, Boston. Dr. Nelson’s research interests are broadly concerned with developmental cognitive neuroscience, an interdis- ciplinary field that requires expertise in developmental neuroscience and developmental psychology. He studies both typically developing children and children at risk for neurodevelopmental disorders, and he employs behavioral, electrophysiological (event-related potential), and metabolic (magnetic resonance imaging) tools in his research. Dr. Nelson chaired the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Early Experience and Brain Development and served on the National Academy of Sciences panel that wrote From Neurons to Neighborhoods. His specific interests are focused on the effects of early experience on brain and behavioral development, particularly as such experience influences the development of memory and of the ability to recognize faces. Dr. Nelson received his Ph.D. in developmental and child psychology from the Univer- sity of Kansas. Ellen E. Pinderhughes, Ph.D., is associate professor in the Eliot-Pearson Department of Child Development at Tufts University. Her research exam- ines the contextual and cultural influences on family socialization processes among families with children at risk for problematic outcomes. She also conducts research on adoption and foster care. She currently has a grant from the National Science Foundation, working as a co-investigator on Excavating Culture in Parenting Practices and Socialization among Diverse Families: A Working Conference. She is a member and serves on the govern- ing board of the Society for Research in Child Development and is a mem- ber of the research advisory committee at the Evan B. Donaldson Adoption Institute. She is also serving as a member of the research and evaluation working group at the Safe Schools/Healthy Students Action Center, located in Alexandria, Virginia. Dr. Pinderhughes received her Ph.D. in psychology from Yale University. Frank W. Putnam, Jr., M.D., is professor of psychiatry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is an adjunct professor of pediatrics and child psychiatry and former director of the Mayerson Center for Safe and Healthy Children at Children’s Hospital Medical Center in Cincinnati. Previously he was scientific director of Every Child Succeeds, a home visita- tion program in Ohio, and later served as deputy director. Prior to his move to Cincinnati in 1999, Dr. Putnam worked with the intramural research program at the National Institute of Mental Health, where he held the po- sitions of chief of the Unit on Developmental Traumatology (1995-1999), senior clinical investigator in the Laboratory of Developmental Psychology

OCR for page 421
APPENDIX C 427 (1986-1995), and staff psychiatrist in the Neuropsychiatry Branch (1982- 1985). He has received numerous honors, including the Morton Prince Scientific Achievement Award in 1985, the Cornelia Wilbur Clinical Service Award in 1990, the U.S. Public Health Service Medal of Commendation in 1992, the Pierre Janet Scientific Writing Award in 1993, and the Ohio Martin Luther King Health Equity Award in 2006. His recent publications include research on the impact of trauma on child development, the experi- ence of mothers in discussing sensitive issues in home visitation programs, and the development of quality infrastructure to support home visiting programs in a tristate area. Dr. Putnam served on the NRC-IOM Com- mittee on Depression, Parenting Practices, and the Health Development of Young Children. He received his M.D. from Indiana University, conducted his residency in adult psychiatry at Yale University, and completed a fel- lowship in child psychiatry at the Children’s National Medical Center in Washington, DC. Desmond K. Runyan, M.D., Dr.P.H., is executive director of the Kempe Center for the Prevention and Treatment of Child Abuse and Neglect in Denver, Colorado. He is also national program director for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars Program. Prior to coming to Kempe in 2011, he was professor of social medicine and pediatrics at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine. His work focuses on the application of clinical epidemiology to the problem of violence against children and the impact of societal intervention on the mental health func- tioning of child victims. He has examined the impact on children of the foster care system, court testimony, and the medical examination. His work has touched on all aspects of abuse, including sexual abuse, physical abuse, Munchausen’s syndrome by proxy, and failure to thrive. He is currently in the twenty-first year of a multistate longitudinal study of the impact of abuse. He also is involved in a 5-year effort to assess the effectiveness of a specific parenting education program, The Period of Purple Crying, aimed at reducing or eliminating the problem of shaken baby syndrome for an entire state. He is a consulting pediatrician at the Colorado Children’s Hospital and head of the section on child abuse in the Department of Pedi- atrics of the University of Colorado. Dr. Runyan received his Dr.P.H. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Public Health, and he received his M.D. and completed his residency in pediatrics at the University of Minnesota Medical School. Cathy Spatz Widom, Ph.D., is distinguished professor in the Department of Psychology at John Jay College and a member of the Graduate Center faculty, City University of New York. A former faculty member at Harvard, Indiana, the State University of New York at Albany, and New Jersey Medi-

OCR for page 421
428 NEW DIRECTIONS IN CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT RESEARCH cal School, she is co-editor of the Journal of Quantitative Criminology and has served on the editorial boards of psychology and criminology journals. She is a fellow of the American Psychological Association (Division 41, Law and Psychology), the American Psychopathological Association, and the American Society of Criminology. She is a frequent consultant on na- tional review panels and has been invited to testify before congressional and state committees. Dr. Widom has published extensively on the long-term consequences of child abuse and neglect, including numerous papers on the cycle of violence. She served on the Committee on Law and Justice of the NRC’s Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and was co-chair of the NRC Panel on Juvenile Crime, Juvenile Justice. Dr. Widom has received numerous awards for her research, including the 1989 American Associa- tion for the Advancement of Science Behavioral Science Research Prize for her paper on the “cycle of violence.” Since 1986, she has been engaged in a large study to determine the long-term consequences of early childhood abuse (physical and sexual) and neglect, and she is currently completing research on the intergenerational transmission of violence. Dr. Widom re- ceived her Ph.D. in psychology from Brandeis University. Joan Levy Zlotnik, Ph.D., A.C.S.W., is director of the Social Work Policy Institute at the National Association of Social Workers. Previously, she served as executive director of the Institute for the Advancement of Social Work Research. She was also director of special projects and special as- sistant to the executive director at the Council on Social Work Education. She is the editor of a book series, Building Social Work Research Capacity, published in 2012 by Oxford University Press, and is co-author of the vol- ume Building Research Culture and Infrastructure. Among her other pub- lications, she is the author of Preparing the Workforce for Family-Centered Practice: Social Work Education and Public Human Services Partnerships; co-editor of several books, including Charting the Impacts of University- Child Welfare Collaboration and Preparing Helping Professionals to Meet Community Needs: Generalizing from the Rural Experience; and co-editor of the fall 2009 special issue of Child Welfare. Dr. Zlotnik is a fellow of the Gerontological Society of America and a National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Social Work Pioneer®. She also received the Association of Gerontology Education in Social Work Leadership Award and the As- sociation of Baccalaureate Social Work Program Director’s Presidential Medal of Honor. She was recognized by the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH’s) Social Work Research Working Group for her efforts on behalf of social work research at NIH. Dr. Zlotnik received her Ph.D. in social work from the University of Maryland.