Appendix B

Speaker Biographical Sketches

Joseph V. Agostini, M.D., is senior medical director for Aetna Medicare. He has responsibility for medical management strategy, clinical initiatives, and provider collaboration oversight nationally for Aetna Medicare members. Dr. Agostini is a graduate of Yale University and Vanderbilt School of Medicine. He completed postgraduate training at Yale–New Haven Hospital and a fellowship in the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program. He is board certified in internal medicine and geriatric medicine. He was previously on the full-time faculty at Yale School of Medicine in geriatrics. His research interests include aging-related health services research, medication prescribing in older persons, and quality of care for those with multiple chronic conditions.

Majd Alwan, Ph.D., is senior vice president of technology and executive director of the LeadingAge Center for Aging Services Technologies (CAST). Dr. Alwan is a noted researcher and authority on aging-services technologies. He is responsible for creating and leading a network of technology companies, providers, and research institutions focused on technology solutions for an aging society. The network advances the interests of older consumers, caregivers, and providers and fosters opportunities for collaboration between provider organizations, technology companies, and research institutions in exploring product development, testing prototypes, evaluating technology, and deploying technology-enabled care models. Prior to joining CAST, Dr. Alwan served as an assistant professor and the director of the Robotics and Eldercare Technologies Program at the University of Virginia’s Medical Automation Research Center. His research interests in-



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Appendix B Speaker Biographical Sketches Joseph V. Agostini, M.D., is senior medical director for Aetna Medicare. He has responsibility for medical management strategy, clinical initiatives, and provider collaboration oversight nationally for Aetna Medicare members. Dr. Agostini is a graduate of Yale University and Vanderbilt School of Medi- cine. He completed postgraduate training at Yale–New Haven Hospital and a fellowship in the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program. He is board certified in internal medicine and geriatric medicine. He was previ- ously on the full-time faculty at Yale School of Medicine in geriatrics. His research interests include aging-related health services research, medication prescribing in older persons, and quality of care for those with multiple chronic conditions. Majd Alwan, Ph.D., is senior vice president of technology and executive director of the LeadingAge Center for Aging Services Technologies (CAST). Dr. Alwan is a noted researcher and authority on aging-services technolo- gies. He is responsible for creating and leading a network of technology companies, providers, and research institutions focused on technology so- lutions for an aging society. The network advances the interests of older consumers, caregivers, and providers and fosters opportunities for collabo- ration between provider organizations, technology companies, and research institutions in exploring product development, testing prototypes, evaluat- ing technology, and deploying technology-enabled care models. Prior to joining CAST, Dr. Alwan served as an assistant professor and the director of the Robotics and Eldercare Technologies Program at the University of Virginia’s Medical Automation Research Center. His research interests in- 63

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64 FOSTERING INDEPENDENCE, PARTICIPATION, AND HEALTHY AGING clude passive functional and health assessment, biomedical instrumentation, medical automation, as well as eldercare and assistive technologies. Timothy Bickmore, Ph.D., is interested in the development and study of re- lational agents, computer agents designed to build and maintain long-term, social-emotional relationships with people. In order to use the same myriad cues that people use when relating to each other, he builds agents that are capable of emulating face-to-face interaction with people, including the use of hand gestures, facial expressions, and body posture, in addition to speech. These agents are effective for tasks in which long-term interactions and personal relationships are known to be important, such as in education, sales and marketing, and particularly health care. Professor Bickmore has conducted communication studies of health provider–patient interactions to develop new approaches to dialogue planning that can address both the behavioral intervention and the social aspects of the interactions. He has also developed animated agents that can emulate this behavior and use appropriate nonverbal behavior in their simulated conversations with patients. In addition, he has conducted several clinical trials to evaluate the efficacy of the resulting systems. Seth Bravin, M.B.A., is strategic industries program manager with the IBM Human Ability and Accessibility Center. This center is a recognized world leader in creating technology and business innovations that support human ability and accessibility. In his prior role with IBM, he worked in finance and planning for the Global Public Sector. Before joining IBM, he worked for Booz Allen Hamilton, a management and technology consult- ing firm, and Dow, Lohnes and Albertson, a corporate law firm. Bravin graduated from Gallaudet University and received his master of business administration degree from Cornell University. He testified before the U.S. Senate about higher education and employment for people with disabilities. He was selected as the Employee of the Year by Careers and the Disabled magazine and taught at the Gallaudet Leadership Institute for three sum- mers. He has hosted several technology camps sponsored by IBM for deaf and hard-of-hearing high school students. He currently serves on the board of Lexington School for the Deaf. Judy Brewer directs the Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) at the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). W3C’s work on Web accessibility includes ensuring that W3C technologies support accessibility; developing acces- sibility guidelines for Web content, browsers, media players, and mobile devices; writing tools; developing resources to improve Web accessibility evaluation tools; providing education and outreach on Web accessibil- ity; coordinating with research and development that may impact future

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APPENDIX B 65 accessibility of the Web; and promoting implementation of Web acces- sibility standards. WAI guidelines include the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0, which has been adopted by many governments around the world; the Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines and User Agent Acces- sibility Guidelines; and Accessible Rich Internet Applications (WAI-ARIA). Ms. Brewer coordinates accessibility policy and standardization issues for W3C internationally, promoting awareness and implementation of Web accessibility and ensuring effective dialogue among industry, the disability community, accessibility researchers, and government on the development of consensus-based accessibility solutions. She is a principal research sci- entist at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. Ms. Brewer is the recipient of a RESNA (Rehabilitation and Engineering Assistive Technology Society of North America) Certificate of Apprecia- tion for efforts related to assistive technology policy development during national health care reform; an Equality of Access and Opportunity Award from the American Foundation for the Blind for advocacy to increase the accessibility of the Windows 95 operating system; and an Access Advance- ment Award from the Association of Access Engineering Specialists for efforts related to Web accessibility. She was named in the August 2000 issue of Internet World as one of the “Net’s Rising Stars.” She received the Harry J. Murphy Catalyst Award at the California State University, Northridge (CSUN) 2002 Conference; the Roland Wagner European Award for Computers Assisting People with Special Needs in 2002; the Susan G. Hadden Pioneer Award from the Alliance for Public Technology in 2003; and SXSW’s Dewey Winburne Community Service Award in 2012. Prior to joining W3C, Ms. Brewer worked on several U.S.-based initiatives to increase access to mainstream technology for people with disabilities and to improve dialog between industry and the disability community. These initiatives included work on Section 508 of the Workforce Investment Act, Section 255 of the Telecommunications Act, accessibility of the Windows 95 Operating System, and access to durable medical equipment for people with disabilities. Ms. Brewer has a background in management, technical writing, education, applied linguistics, and disability advocacy. Rory A. Cooper, Ph.D., received B.S. and M.Eng. degrees in electrical engi- neering from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, and a Ph.D. degree in electrical and computer engineering with a concentration in bioengineering from University of California, Santa Barbara. He is FISA and Paralyzed Veterans of America (PVA) Chair and distinguished professor in the Department of Rehabilitation Science and Technology, and professor of bioengineering, mechanical engineering, physical medicine and rehabili- tation, and orthopedic surgery at the University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Cooper is founding director and Veterans Affairs (VA) senior research career scientist

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66 FOSTERING INDEPENDENCE, PARTICIPATION, AND HEALTHY AGING of the Human Engineering Research Laboratories, a VA Rehabilitation Research and Development Center of Excellence in partnership with the University of Pittsburgh. He is also the codirector of the National Science Foundation’s Quality of Life Technology Engineering Research Center, a joint effort between the University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon Uni- versity. Dr. Cooper has written or cowritten more than 250 peer-reviewed journal publications, and he has more than 10 patents awarded or pending. Dr. Cooper is the author of two books: Rehabilitation Engineering Applied to Mobility and Manipulation and Wheelchair Selection and Configura- tion. In 1988 he was a bronze medalist in the Paralympic Games, Seoul, Republic of Korea. He was on the steering committee for the 1996 Para- lympic Scientific Congress held in Atlanta, Georgia, and the sports scientist for the 2008 U.S. Paralympic Team in Beijing, China. Dr. Cooper, a U.S. Army veteran with a spinal cord injury, is also a director of the Paralyzed Veterans of America Research Foundation. He currently serves as a member of the U.S. Secretary of Veterans Affairs Prosthetics and Special Disability Programs Advisory Committee, the board of directors of Easter Seals, and other national committees and boards. Dr. Cooper was recognized in the Congressional Record of the United States Congress on Monday, July 27, 2009, for his contributions to people with disabilities and for his personal example. Joseph F. Coughlin, Ph.D., is director of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology AgeLab. His research provides insights on how demographic change, technology, social trends, and consumer behavior will converge to drive future innovations in business and government. Based in MIT’s En- gineering Systems Division, he teaches policy and systems innovation and is author of the online publication Disruptive Demographics. He is one of Fast Company magazine’s “100 Most Creative People in Business” and was named by the Wall Street Journal as one of “12 pioneers inventing the future of retirement and how we will all live, work and play tomorrow.” Dr. Coughlin is a behavioral sciences fellow of the Gerontological Society of America and a fellow of Switzerland’s World Demographics and Ageing Forum, advising and speaking to businesses, governments, and nonprof- its worldwide. He has served on numerous advisory boards, including those for British Telecom Health, Daimler, Fidelity Investments, Gallup, Healthways, Nissan, Putnam Investments, Sanofi-Aventis, and Toyota. He was appointed by President Bush to the White House Conference on Aging Advisory Committee. Dr. Coughlin has worked with governments in Asia and the European Union and with the World Economic Forum, the Or- ganisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, and the Council on Foreign Relations on demographic change, technology, and strategic advantage. He has been featured on ABC News, the BBC, CBS Sunday

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APPENDIX B 67 Morning, CNN, NBC’s Today Show, and Dr. Oz and in News Asia, Econo- mist, Financial Times, Straits Times, New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and other media outlets throughout the world. Prior to MIT he was with EG&G, a Fortune 1000 science and technology firm consulting to business and government worldwide. Geoff Fernie, B.Sc., Ph.D., MI.Mech.E., C.Eng., P.Eng., CCE, has a primary appointment at the University of Toronto as professor in the Department of Surgery with cross appointments that include the Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, Departments of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Physical Therapy, and Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy. He is a professional engineer and institute director for research at Toronto Rehabilitation Institute–University Health Network. Dr. Fernie is recognized as a world leader in the application of engineering to create solutions for problems commonly encountered by people with disabilities. He is the principal investigator on a major infrastructure award from Canada Foundation for Innovation which funded the most advanced de- sign, prototyping, and testing facilities for rehabilitation technology and assistive devices in the world. He focuses on the development of technology to help people continue to live in their own homes. He has six commercial- ized products and four currently in clinical trials and has helped launch three successful companies. He has published more than 120 peer-reviewed journal papers and book chapters and has 17 awarded patents and an ad- ditional 11 filings. Dr. Fernie’s achievements have been recognized by the Jonas Salk Award, the MEDEC Award, the Mickey Milner Award, and the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal, and he has been admitted to the Terry Fox Hall of Fame and the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences. Clayton Lewis, Ph.D., is professor of computer science and fellow of the Institute of Cognitive Science at the University of Colorado. He is well known for his work (with students and colleagues) on evaluation methods in user interface design, including the thinking aloud and cognitive walk- through methods. His recent work on technology for people with cognitive disabilities has been presented to the U.S. Access Board Technical Advisory Committee, CSUN, the Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technol- ogy Society of North America (RESNA), the Association for Computing Machinery ASSETS forum, and other forums, and he has served as scien- tist in residence at the Coleman Institute for Cognitive Disabilities. He is a member of the CHI Academy, recognizing his contributions to human computer interaction. He is currently on leave from the university, serving as a consultant on cloud computing for the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research.

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68 FOSTERING INDEPENDENCE, PARTICIPATION, AND HEALTHY AGING G. P. Li, Ph.D., is a professor at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) with appointments in three departments: Electrical Engineering and Com- puter Science, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, and Biomedical Engineering. At UCI, he also serves as division director of the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2) and director of the Integrated Nanosystems Research Facility in the Henry Samueli School of Engineering. He serves as the National Science Founda- tions’s Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship (IGERT) “LifeChips” director at UCI to promote a new research paradigm that has driven the need for collaborations among researchers from traditionally dif- ferent backgrounds and cultures, namely, life scientists (biologists, medical researchers) and technologists (physical scientists, nano/micro engineers). LifeChips also represents the fusion of two major industries, the micro- electronics industry with the life science industry. Li holds 22 U.S. patents, with an additional 12 patents pending, and has published more than 300 research papers involving microelectronic technologies, microwave circuit design, microelectromechanical systems for communication and biomedi- cal instrumentation applications, and bio-nano-IT technology. During his tenure as a research staff member and manager of the technology group at IBM’s T.J. Watson Research Center (1983-1988), Li worked in the area of very large scal integration technology and led a research/development team to transfer the technology into the marketplace. In 1987 he chaired a committee charged with defining IBM’s semiconductor technology road- map beyond the year 2000. A member of numerous technical committees at professional conferences, Li was chair of the Taiwan VLSI Technology, Circuit, and System Conference in 2006. He also served as chair of the executive committee for electronics manufacturing research and new mate- rials at the University of Southern California. Li received an Outstanding Research Contribution Award from IBM (1987), two Outstanding Engi- neering Professor awards from UCI (1997 and 2001), the UCI Innovators Award (2005), Best Paper award from the ITC International Telemetering Conference (2005), and Outstanding Asian American and Pacific Islander Community Leaders and Role Models award by the Asian Business Asso- ciation of Orange County (2009). Li has been involved in several startup companies as a cofounder or member of the technical advisory board. Cur- rently, he also directs TechPortal, a technology business incubator housed at the UCI division of Calit2, which supports and nurtures young companies and university researchers commercializing their technologies. His current research interests focus on developing technologies for efficient energy utilization and consumption and e-health (empowering human health and wellness with IT/communication and sensor/biofeedback technologies).

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APPENDIX B 69 P. Hunter Peckham, Ph.D., is the Donnell Institute Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Orthopaedics; distinguished university professor; execu- tive director, Institute for Functional Restoration (IFR) at Case Western Reserve University; senior career research scientist and associate director of Technology Transfer, Cleveland FES Center of Excellence, in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs; and member of the bioscientific staff at Metrohealth Medical Center. The IFR deploys neuroprosthetic interven- tions into clinical use to restore the functions lost due to spinal cord injury or other paralytic conditions. Under the leadership of Dr. Peckham, the IFR acts as the surrogate corporate partner for the neural technologies that have been demonstrated to be feasible within the research programs. Dr. Peckham is also the principal investigator on the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Biomedical Research Partnership Award, which has led to the development of the networked neuroprosthe- sis. Dr. Peckham’s major area of research is in rehabilitation engineering and neuroprostheses. His research effort focuses on functional restoration of the paralyzed upper extremity in individuals with spinal cord injury. He and collaborators developed a number of implantable neural prostheses that use electrical stimulation to control neuromuscular activation. They have implemented procedures to provide control to the upper extremity in individuals with tetraplegia, enabling individuals with central nervous system disability to regain the ability to perform essential activities of daily living. His present efforts concern technology development, expansion of the indications for this technology, and technology transfer. Dr. Peckham is a fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering; a fellow and honorary member of the American Spinal Injury Association; and member of the National Academy of Engineering. He is also a member of numerous professional organizations. Dr. Peckham received the Paul B. Magnuson Award, the highest honor for VA rehabilitation investigators. He received his undergraduate degree in mechanical engineering from Clarkson College of Technology (now Clarkson University), Potsdam, New York, and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in biomedical engineering from Case Western Reserve University. Marc Perlman is global vice president for the health care and life sciences industry at Oracle, responsible for driving strategy and industry solutions across the organization. With more than 29 years in the health care in- dustry, Mr. Perlman brings in-depth experience in working with payers, providers, health and device manufacturers, consumers, and the federal government to improve operational performance, clinical quality, patient safety, and revenue cycle performance. Mr. Perlman joined Oracle from the McKesson Corporation, where during his 13-year tenure he progressed

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70 FOSTERING INDEPENDENCE, PARTICIPATION, AND HEALTHY AGING through operational and sales leadership roles in its provider technology solutions, health solutions, and medication safety/automation businesses. Prior to McKesson, he held executive roles with various health care organi- zations focused on analytics, services, and innovative disease management programs. Steve Saling was diagnosed with the neurodegenerative condition of amyo- trophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, at the age of 38. When given a life expectancy of 2 to 5 years, Saling decided to change the way ALS patients were living their lives. During the next 3 years, Saling helped create the Steve Saling ALS Residence in Chelsea, Massachu- setts. It is the first and only urban model Green House® ALS and multiple sclerosis model in the world. Steve teamed up with visionary chief execu- tive officer Barry Berman of the Chelsea Jewish Foundation (www.chelsea jewish.org), and together they designed and built the award-winning Leonard Florence Center for Living (LFCL). The residences are fully au- tomated to provide a level of independence and productivity previously unavailable. Saling set out to prove that ALS does not have to be fatal anymore. His motto is simple, yet powerful: “Until medicine proves other- wise, technology IS the cure.” Today, 6 years after he was diagnosed with ALS, Saling is living a busy and productive life. In addition to skydiving, sailing, and skiing (here is a link to last summer’s skydiving expedition: http://vimeo.com/25932889), Saling goes on outings with his son, gives tours of the center, and writes articles and produces videos about living with ALS. As cofounder of the ALS Residence Initiative, Steve is working to replicate the residences across the country. Recently he arranged a tour of the LFCL for Steve Gleason, the former NFL New Orleans Saints player who was diagnosed with ALS. As a result, a second ALS residence is sched- uled to open in New Orleans. Steve’s story is one of courage, inspiration, and motivation. Please visit his Facebook page at http://www.facebook. com/smoothsaling. Saling continues tirelessly to help individuals with dis- abilities regain their spirit and zest for living. Saling notes, “My whole life has perfectly prepared me to be right where I am today. I was a very good landscape architect, and I am proud of my professional achievements, but my most important work will be done after I got ALS.” Jon Sanford, M.Arch., is director of the Center for Assistive Technology and Environmental Access and an associate professor of industrial design in the College of Architecture at Georgia Tech. He is also a research ar- chitect at the Rehabilitation Research and Development Center at the At- lanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Mr. Sanford received both B.S. and M.Arch. degrees from Georgia Tech and is one of the few architecturally trained researchers engaged in accessible and universal design. He has been

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APPENDIX B 71 actively involved in research and development related to the accessibility and usability of products, technologies, and environments for the past 25 years and was one of the authors of the Principles of Universal Design. He is the codirector of the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR)-funded Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Workplace Accommodations, and he recently received a 5-year NIDRR Disability and Rehabilitation Research Project award to examine the effects of universal design on workplace participation of employees with disabili- ties. He currently teaches a course in universal design in the Architecture and Industrial Design Programs and serves as an academic advisor to both master of industrial design and Ph.D. students. He has almost 250 peer- reviewed presentations, publications, and book chapters and has recently published the book Design for the Ages: Universal Design as a Rehabilita- tion Strategy. Greg Wellems began his career 25 years ago in direct care supports. For the past 20 years he has worked as the chief operating officer of Imagine!, a service provider located in Boulder, Colorado. Mr. Wellems is responsible for the development of many innovative programs designed to better meet the needs of persons with disabilities and has created software programs that are being used by human service providers across the nation. His cur- rent focus is on developing and incorporating technology to improve sup- ports for individuals with cognitive disabilities. This focus has resulted in the development of the two SmartHomes, which serve as a model for the future of care for individuals with cognitive disabilities and related condi- tions. Mr. Wellems also works as a consultant, assisting organizations to implement technology, and he serves as a member of the board of directors for the American Network of Community Options and Resources. Carolee J. Winstein, Ph.D., PT, FAPTA, runs an interdisciplinary research program focused on understanding control, rehabilitation, and recovery of goal-directed movements that emerge from a dynamic brain-behavior system in brain-damaged conditions. With funding from the National In- stitutes of Health, she and her team are leading a multisite Phase III ran- domized controlled trial—ICARE (Interdisciplinary Comprehensive Arm Recovery Evaluation) stroke initiative—to improve outpatient therapy for arm weakness after stroke. With funding from the Foundation for Physi- cal Therapy, she led the first physical therapy clinical research network, PTClinResNet, which supported clinical research on the effectiveness of task-specific/muscle-specific training to enhance muscle performance and functional activities across four disability groups: adult spinal cord injury, cerebral palsy in children, adult stroke, and low back pain. In 2008, with funding from the NIDRR and U.S. Department of Education, she and her

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72 FOSTERING INDEPENDENCE, PARTICIPATION, AND HEALTHY AGING colleagues at University of Southern California and Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Hospital established a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center (RERC) to study the challenges of growing older with and into disabilities and the positive effects that new technologies can have on independence, health, and quality of life. With funding from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and in collaboration with colleagues at the University of Southern California, Winstein recently launched a new development-of-concept trial, Optimizing Dosage of Re- habilitation after Stroke, to ultimately determine prospectively the dose of therapy that maximizes the efficacy of treatment, that is, determine the smallest effective dose for individual patients. Mohammed Yousuf, M.S., is a research engineer in the Office of Opera- tions Research and Development at the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and, under FHWA’s Exploratory Advanced Research Program, is leading research on new technology solutions for wayfinding and naviga- tion guidance for people with vision impairments and other disabilities. As a member of the GeoAccess Challenge Team, Mr. Yousuf worked on the White House report Data-Enabled Travel: How Geo-Data Can Support Inclusive Transportation, Tourism, and Navigation through Communi- ties. Prior to joining FHWA, he worked at General Motors and Chrysler Group in vehicle product development, telematics and infotainment, and advanced service diagnostics. He has a B.S. in electronics and communica- tion engineering from Osmania University in India and an M.S. in computer engineering from Wayne State University in Michigan.