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Committee Biographies

Lawrence W. Green, Dr.P.H., M.P.H. (Chair), is professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the University of California, San Francisco. Prior to his current position, Dr. Green was director of the Office of Science and Extramural Research at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Dr. Green’s area of interest is policy and program implications of health research and evaluation. Under President Carter’s Administration, Dr. Green served as the first director of the Office of Health Information, Health Promotion, Physical Fitness, and Sports Medicine in the Department of Health and Human Services. He has served on the public health faculties at University of California, Berkeley; The Johns Hopkins University; Harvard University; the University of Texas; and the University of British Columbia and as vice president and director of the Kaiser Family Foundation’s National Health Promotion Program. Dr. Green is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM). He serves as a member of the IOM Committee on Valuing Community-Based, Non-Clinical Prevention and Wellness Strategies, and he served on the IOM Committee on An Evidence Framework for Obesity Prevention Decision Making and as an ex officio member of the IOM’s Clinical Research Roundtable. Earlier, he chaired both the IOM Committee to Review the CDC’s Centers for Research and Demonstration of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention and the IOM Committee on Drug Abuse Prevention Research. He received his B.S., M.P.H., and Dr.P.H. from the University of California, Berkeley.

Christina Bethell, Ph.D., M.P.H., M.B.A., is professor in the Department of Pediatrics at Oregon Health and Science University School of Medicine and founding director of the Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative (CAHMI) and the National Data Resource Center for Child and Adolescent Health (DRC). The DRC is a Health Resources and Services Administration funded center to assist in the development, dissemination, and applied use of population-based data, with a focus on the National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH) and the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (NS-CSHCN). Her research focuses on understanding and enhancing the role of the health care system to protect and improve health outcomes and promote the early and lifelong development of health of children, with a major focus on the development, testing, and implementation of consumer-centered methods to measure and improve health and the health care quality of health systems and providers. Dr. Bethell serves as principal investigator for the collaborative development, validation, and national, state, and local implementation of child, youth, and family health and health care quality data and tools. These



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J Committee Biographies Lawrence W. Green, Dr.P.H., M.P.H. (Chair), is professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the University of California, San Francisco. Prior to his current position, Dr. Green was director of the Office of Science and Extramural Research at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Dr. Green’s area of interest is policy and program implications of health research and evaluation. Under President Carter’s Administration, Dr. Green served as the first director of the Office of Health Information, Health Promotion, Physical Fitness, and Sports Medicine in the Department of Health and Human Services. He has served on the public health faculties at University of California, Berkeley; The Johns Hopkins University; Harvard University; the University of Texas; and the University of British Columbia and as vice president and director of the Kaiser Family Foundation’s National Health Promotion Program. Dr. Green is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM). He serves as a member of the IOM Committee on Valuing Community-Based, Non-Clinical Prevention and Wellness Strategies, and he served on the IOM Committee on An Evidence Framework for Obesity Prevention Decision Making and as an ex officio member of the IOM’s Clinical Research Roundtable. Earlier, he chaired both the IOM Committee to Review the CDC’s Centers for Research and Demonstration of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention and the IOM Committee on Drug Abuse Prevention Research. He received his B.S., M.P.H., and Dr.P.H. from the University of California, Berkeley. Christina Bethell, Ph.D., M.P.H., M.B.A., is professor in the Department of Pediatrics at Oregon Health and Science University School of Medicine and founding director of the Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative (CAHMI) and the National Data Resource Center for Child and Adolescent Health (DRC). The DRC is a Health Resources and Services Administration funded center to assist in the development, dissemination, and applied use of population-based data, with a focus on the National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH) and the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (NS-CSHCN). Her research focuses on understanding and enhancing the role of the health care system to protect and improve health outcomes and promote the early and lifelong development of health of chil- dren, with a major focus on the development, testing, and implementation of consumer-centered methods to measure and improve health and the health care quality of health systems and providers. Dr. Bethell serves as principal investigator for the collaborative development, validation, and national, state, and local implementation of child, youth, and family health and health care quality data and tools. These 443

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tools include the Promoting Healthy Development Survey (PHDS), the Young Adult Health Care Survey (YAHCS), the Children with Special Health Care Needs Screener (CSHCN Screener), the Medical Home Measurement Module, and other child health and health care quality measures, most of which have been endorsed for voluntary use by the National Quality Forum. Her work to promote the prevention and treatment of childhood overweight and obesity includes publications on national, across state, and across child findings from the NSCH and design of parent-driven tools to identify their child’s risks and needs and improve the quality of well-child care (www.WellVisitPlanner.org). Dr. Bethell earned her under- graduate degree in psychology from the University of California, Los Angeles. She received her M.P.H. and M.B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley, and earned a Ph.D. in health services and policy research from the University of Chicago. Ronette R. Briefel, Dr.P.H., R.D., is a senior fellow at Mathematica Policy Research. Before join- ing Mathematica in 1999, she held several nutrition research and nutrition policy positions with the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) program of the National Center for Health Statistics, CDC. Dr. Briefel is an expert in dietary and nutrition assessment and population-based strategies to prevent disease and promote health. Her expertise covers childhood obesity, food insecurity, chronic disease epidemiology, and analysis and interpretation of national survey data to study low-income and high-risk populations. Previously, Dr. Briefel led national studies on the food consumption patterns and nutrient intakes of infants, toddlers, and preschoolers; evaluations of the school food environment, school meals, and children’s diet and obesity; and evidence-based reviews of children’s dietary guidance. She is a principal investigator for the evaluation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA’s) Summer Electronic Benefits Transfer for Children Demonstration that is providing food assistance to low-income children in the summer months. Dr. Briefel served on the IOM Committee on Strategies to Reduce Sodium Intake in the United States; the IOM Committee on Dietary Risk Assessment in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) Program; and the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education Committee on National Statistics Project on Enhancing the Data Infrastructure in Support of Food and Nutrition Programs, Research, and Decision Making. She served on the External Scientific Panel for the National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research (NCCOR) in 2012 and received the American Dietetic Association Foundation Elaine R. Monsen Award for Outstanding Research Literature in 2011. Dr. Briefel received a Dr.P.H. in chronic disease epidemiology from the University of Pittsburgh and is a registered dietitian. Ross C. Brownson, Ph.D., is professor in the Brown School and the School of Medicine (Division of Public Health Sciences) at Washington University in St. Louis. He is involved in numerous community- level studies designed to reduce modifiable risk factors such as physical inactivity, unhealthy eating, and tobacco use. In particular, he is interested in evaluating the impacts of environmental and policy inter- ventions on health behaviors. Dr. Brownson conducts research on dissemination and implementation of evidence-based interventions in public health and policy settings. He is co-director of the CDC-funded Prevention Research Center (PRC), a project aimed at developing innovative approaches to chronic dis- ease prevention. Current activities of the PRC include evaluation of a wide range of physical activity and obesity policies. Dr. Brownson is the author of 7 books and 340 peer-reviewed articles. His books include Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Control, Applied Epidemiology, Handbook of Obesity Prevention, 444 Evaluating Obesity Prevention Efforts

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Evidence-Based Public Health, and Dissemination and Implementation Research in Health: Translating Science to Practice. Dr. Brownson served on the IOM Committees on An Evidence Framework for Obesity Prevention Decision Making, Progress in Preventing Childhood Obesity, and Prevention of Obesity in Children and Youth. He received his Ph.D. in environmental health and epidemiology from Colorado State University. Jamie F. Chriqui, Ph.D., M.H.S., is a senior research scientist and director of policy surveillance and eval- uation for the Health Policy Center within the Institute for Health Research and Policy at the University of Illinois, Chicago (UIC), and a research associate professor in political science at UIC. Prior to join- ing UIC, Dr. Chriqui served as technical vice-president of the Center for Health Policy and Legislative Analysis at The MayaTech Corporation and, previously, as a policy analyst at the National Institute on Drug Abuse. She has experience conducting public health policy research, evaluation, and analysis, with an emphasis on obesity, substance abuse, tobacco control, and other chronic disease–related policy issues. Her research interests focus on examining the impact of law and policy on community and school environments as well as individual behaviors and attitudes. Her current research focuses on community policies related to the physical activity and food environments, sugar-sweetened beverage taxation, and school district wellness policies. She directs all state, local, and school district policy research activities for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation–supported Bridging the Gap program and is principal investiga- tor or co-investigator on several National Institutes of Health (NIH) research grants. Dr. Chriqui serves on numerous obesity-related advisory and expert panels. She is a member of the IOM Committee on Accelerating Progress in Obesity Prevention. She holds a B.A. in political science from Barnard College at Columbia University, an M.H.S. in health policy from The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and a Ph.D. in policy sciences (health policy concentration) from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Stephen Fawcett, Ph.D., is Kansas Health Foundation distinguished professor in the Department of Applied Behavioral Science at the University of Kansas (KU) and the director of KU Work for Community Health and Development, a World Health Organization Collaborating Centre. Dr. Fawcett uses methods of behavioral science and community development to help understand and improve how communities create conditions that promote health and development. He is co-author of nearly 200 articles and book chapters and several books in the areas of community and public health, child and youth health and development, and community development. He has consulted with a number of private foundations and national and international organizations, including the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), CDC, and Pan American Health Organization. A former visiting scholar at the World Health Organization (WHO), he serves as a member of the WHO Expert Panel on Health Promotion. He is the author of sci- entific publications about community approaches to obesity prevention. Dr. Fawcett was an IOM Scholar- in-Residence, an external reviewer for the IOM Committee report on Progress in Preventing Childhood Obesity, and a member of the IOM Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice. Dr. Fawcett received his Ph.D. in developmental psychology from KU. Brian R. Flay, D.Phil., is a professor in the School of Social and Behavioral Health Sciences in the College of Public Health and Human Sciences at Oregon State University. Dr. Flay’s research interests include Appendix J 445

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health promotion and disease prevention research, mass media for health promotion and disease preven- tion, positive youth development, comprehensive school reform, and prevention research theory and methods. His research focuses on understanding and preventing the adoption of unsafe behaviors, with particular attention to the health of children and adolescents. Dr. Flay is the author of numerous sci- entific publications about child and adolescent risk behaviors, particularly among low socioeconomic status groups. He previously served as a member on the IOM Committee on Reducing Tobacco Use, the IOM Committee on HIV Prevention Strategies, and the IOM Panel on Evaluation of AIDS Interventions. Dr. Flay received his D.Phil. from Waikato University, New Zealand, and completed his postdoctoral stud- ies at Northwestern University. Deanna M. Hoelscher, Ph.D., R.D., L.D., C.N.S., is the John P. McGovern Professor in Health Promotion and Behavioral Sciences and director of the Michael & Susan Dell Center for Healthy Living at the University of Texas School of Public Health, Austin Regional Campus. Dr. Hoelscher’s research interests include child and adolescent nutrition, school-based health promotion programs, dietary and physical activity assessment methodology, evaluation of child obesity policies, and dissemination of school health programs. She has been the principal investigator on many research projects with child and adolescent populations, most notably the Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health (CATCH) and the Travis County CATCH project, studies to decrease cardiovascular risk factors in children and childhood obesity; the School Physical Activity and Nutrition (SPAN) study, a child and adolescent overweight prevalence study in Texas; the Texas Child Obesity Prevention Policy Evaluation (T-COPPE) project; and Lunch is in the Bag, an NIH-funded parent program that addresses lunch-packing behaviors. She is also principal investigator of the Texas Child Obesity Research Demonstration (Texas CORD) grant to devel- op, implement, and evaluate an integrated, systems-oriented approach to obesity prevention and weight management for underserved, ethnically diverse children ages 2 to 12. Dr. Hoelscher is president of the International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity. She was a reviewer on the following IOM reports: Strategies to Reduce Sodium Intake in the United States, School Meals: Building Blocks for Healthy Children, and Nutrition Standards for Foods in Schools. Dr. Hoelscher was chair of the Texas Council on Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke from 2003 to 2005 and of the Research Dietary Practice Group of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics from 2004 to 2005. She has served as the Public Health Nutrition Division chair of the Society for Nutrition Education and was program chair of the Annual Meeting Planning Committee for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Dr. Hoelscher received her B.S. in food science and technology from Texas A&M University and her M.A. in nutrition and Ph.D. in bio- logical sciences from the University of Texas. Dr. Hoelscher is a registered dietitian. James W. Krieger, M.D., M.P.H., is chief of the Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention Section at Public Health–Seattle & King County, and clinical professor of Medicine and Health Services and attending physi- cian at the University of Washington. Dr. Krieger is a nationally recognized expert in the development and evaluation of community-based chronic disease control and prevention programs. His recent research work has emphasized interventions to reduce health disparities in healthy eating and active living by addressing social and physical environmental determinants of health. He has worked with multiple sectors to imple- ment and evaluate menu labeling in King County, design and build healthy public housing communities, reduce access to sugary beverages, and develop and evaluate community health worker interventions to 446 Evaluating Obesity Prevention Efforts

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address chronic diseases. He recently led Seattle & King County’s Communities Putting Prevention to Work (CPPW) program and now co-leads the local Community Transformation Grant. He has also played a lead role in other multi-sector community-based partnerships that address health inequities, including REACH, Steps, Allies Against Asthma (RWJF), and Food and Fitness (Kellogg). Dr. Krieger was a mem- ber of the IOM Committee on Childhood Obesity Action for Local Governments. He is founding chair of the National Association of County and City Health Officials Big Cities Chronic Disease Community of Practice and leads its sugar-sweetened beverage work group. He is co-chair of Advancing the Movement, a CDC- and foundation-sponsored effort to connect the hundreds of healthy community initiatives across the nation into a learning community. He has received numerous awards for his work, including the U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Innovation in Prevention, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Healthy Homes Innovation, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Children’s Environmental Health Excellence Awards. He received his undergraduate degree from Harvard University, completed medical training at the University of California, San Francisco, and received an M.P.H. from the University of Washington. Laura C. Leviton, Ph.D., is senior adviser for evaluation at RWJF. Since joining RWJF in 1999, she has overseen evaluations in most of RWJF’s areas of focus and continues that role today on the founda- tion initiatives in preventing childhood obesity and for vulnerable populations. Previously, Dr. Leviton was a professor of public health at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and on the faculty of the University of Pittsburgh School of Public Health. She was president of the American Evaluation Association in 2000. She is the co-author of two books—Foundations of Program Evaluation and Confronting Public Health Risks—and serves on several editorial boards for evaluation journals. Dr. Leviton served on the IOM Committee to Evaluate Preparedness for Terrorist Attacks and the IOM Committee to Assess the Hearing Loss Prevention Program of the National Institute on Occupational Safety and Health. She is a founding member of the Improvement Science Development Group of the Health Foundation of the United Kingdom. She received the 2011 award for evaluation publication of the year from the American Evaluation Association. She received a B.A. in psychology from Reed College, a Ph.D. in social psychology from the University of Kansas, and her postdoctoral training in evaluation research from Northwestern University. K. M. Venkat Narayan, M.D., M.Sc., M.B.A., is Ruth and O.C. Hubert Professor of Global Health and Epidemiology at Rollins School of Public Health and professor Medicine, School of Medicine at Emory University. Dr. Narayan is a physician-scientist trained in internal medicine, geriatric medicine, and pre- ventive medicine, and specializes in the epidemiology and prevention of obesity, diabetes, and vascular diseases. Until 2006, he led the Diabetes, Epidemiology, and Statistics Branch, Division of Diabetes Translation, CDC. Dr. Narayan was a visiting scientist at BIH from 1992 to 1996. He is an investigator in several large, multicenter, national studies of diabetes, including the TRIAD Study of diabetes quality of care, Diabetes Prevention Program, the ACCORD Trial of cariovascular disease prevention, and the SEARCH study of diabetes in children. He has authored more than 300 peer-reviewed journal articles. Dr. Narayan directs the Emory Global Diabetes Research Center and is principal investigator on three global health training grants. He is a fellow of the American College of Physicians, Royal College of Physicians ­ of Ireland, and the faculty of public health medicine of the Royal College of Physicians, United Kingdom. Appendix J 447

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Dr. Narayan served on the IOM Committee on a National Surveillance System for Cardiovascular and Select Chronic Diseases. He received his M.Sc. from the University of Edinburgh, his M.B.A. from Edinburgh’s Heriot-Watt University, and his M.D. from St. Johns Medical College, Bangalore, India. Nico P. Pronk, Ph.D., is vice president and chief science officer at HealthPartners in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Dr. Pronk is a senior research investigator at the HealthPartners Research Foundation and holds an adjunct faculty position as professor of Society, Human Development, and Health at the Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Pronk is widely published in both the scientific and practice literatures and is a national and international speaker on population health and health promotion. He a member of the Task Force on Community Preventive Services, the founding president of the International Association for Worksite Health Promotion (IAWHP), and a member of the Research Advisory Committee of the Health Enhancement Research Organization (HERO). Among other activities, Dr. Pronk formerly served on the Clinical Obesity Research Panel at NIH, the Carter Center Medical Home initiative, the Defense Health Board (Armed Forces Epidemiological Board), the Health Promotion Advisory Panel at the National Commission on Quality Assurance (NCQA), and various IOM committees. He is the senior editor of ACSM’s Worksite Health Handbook, Second Edition and the author of the scientific background paper for the business and industry sector of the U.S. National Physical Activity Plan. Dr. Pronk received his doctorate degree in exercise physiology at Texas A&M University and completed his postdoctoral studies in behavioral medicine at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Lorrene Ritchie, Ph.D., R.D., is director of research at the Atkins Center for Weight and Health at the University of California, Berkeley. To identify promising target behaviors for the prevention of obesity and its co-morbidities, Dr. Ritchie has led several evidence-based reviews of the scientific literature. She served as an evidence analyst for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (formerly the American Dietetic Association) and was a member of the Academy’s Pediatric Weight Management Workgroup to formu- late evidence-based practice guidelines. She was the lead author of the Academy’s 2006 position paper on pediatric weight management and is co-authoring the upcoming 2013 update to this paper. Dr. Ritchie co-authored a comprehensive book on the determinants of obesity (Obesity: Dietary and Developmental Influences). She has devoted her career to the development of interdisciplinary, science-based, and cul- turally relevant solutions to the obesity epidemic and has conducted studies in numerous settings on the implementation and evaluation of nutrition policy and promotion activities. Her research interests include dietary patterns, timing of eating and sleep duration in relation to the development of obesity, evaluation of the impact of food and beverage policy in child care and school settings, the effect of nutrition educa- tion in Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children, and the relationship between community-based nutrition programs and policies and the development of obesity in children. Dr. Ritchie has an M.S. and Ph.D. in nutritional sciences from the University of California, Berkeley, and is a registered dietitian. Elsie Taveras, M.D., M.P.H., is associate professor of pediatrics and population medicine at Harvard Medical School and of Nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health. She is chief of the Division of General Academic Pediatrics and director of Pediatric Population Health Management at Massachusetts 448 Evaluating Obesity Prevention Efforts

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General Hospital. Her main focus of research is understanding determinants of obesity in children and developing interventions to prevent obesity, especially in underserved populations. She is principal inves- tigator of several NIH- and CDC-funded studies related to childhood obesity prevention. Dr. Taveras has extensive expertise in epidemiologic investigations into the developmental origins of obesity, obesity pre- vention and treatment, pediatrics, examining racial/ethnic disparities, and direction of cluster randomized trials in the clinical setting. Her work spans the spectrum of study designs in obesity from observational, epidemiology studies to interventions across the life course. She served on the IOM Committee on Obesity Prevention Policies for Young Children. Dr. Taveras trained in pediatrics at Children’s Hospital Boston and Boston Medical Center and received her M.P.H. from the Harvard School of Public Health. Appendix J 449

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