C: Committee Biosketches

Dan Hanfling, M.D. (Co-Chair), is special advisor to the Inova Health System in Falls Church, Virginia, on matters related to emergency preparedness and disaster response. He is a board-certified emergency physician practicing at Inova Fairfax Hospital, Northern Virginia’s Level I trauma center. He serves as an operational medical director for air medical services and has responsibilities as a medical team manager for Virginia Task Force One, a Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and U.S. Agency for International Development sanctioned international urban search and rescue team. He has been involved in the response to the Izmit, Turkey, earthquake in 1999; the Pentagon in September 2001; and Hurricanes Rita and Katrina in 2005, and Gustav and Ike in 2008. He also participated in the response to the devastating earthquake in January 2010 near Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Dr. Hanfling was integrally involved in the management of the response to the anthrax bioterror mailings in the fall of 2001, when two cases of inhalational anthrax were successfully diagnosed and managed at Inova Fairfax Hospital. Dr. Hanfling is a founding member of the Northern Virginia Hospital Alliance. He has testified before Congress on the issues of disaster preparedness, and lectures nationally and internationally on prehospital-, hospital-, and disaster-related subjects. He served as vice chair of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Committee on Establishing Standards of Care in Disaster Events. Dr. Hanfling received an A.B. in political science from Duke University, and was awarded his medical degree from Brown University. He completed an internship in internal medicine at the Miriam Hospital in Providence, Rhode Island, and an emergency medicine residency at George Washington/ Georgetown University Hospitals. He is a clinical professor of emergency medicine at George Washington University, contributing scholar at the UPMC Center for BioSecurity, and adjunct distinguished senior fellow at the George Mason University School of Public Policy.

John L. Hick, M.D. (Co-Chair), is a faculty emergency physician at Hennepin County Medical Center (HCMC) and an associate professor of emergency medicine at the University of Minnesota. He serves as the associate medical director for Hennepin County Emergency Medical Services and as medical director for emergency preparedness at HCMC. He also serves the Minnesota Department of Health as the medical director for the Office of Emergency Preparedness. He is the founder and past chair of the Minneapolis/ St. Paul Metropolitan Hospital Compact, a 30-hospital mutual aid and planning group active since 2002. He is involved at many levels of planning for surge capacity and crisis standards of care (CSC) and traveled to Greece to assist its health care system preparations for the 2004 Summer Olympics as part of a 15-mem-



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C: Committee Biosketches Dan Hanfling, M.D. (Co-Chair), is special advisor to the Inova Health System in Falls Church, Virginia, on matters related to emergency preparedness and disaster response. He is a board-certified emergency physician practicing at Inova Fairfax Hospital, Northern Virginia’s Level I trauma center. He serves as an operational medical director for air medical services and has responsibilities as a medical team manager for Virginia Task Force One, a Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and U.S. Agency for Inter- national Development sanctioned international urban search and rescue team. He has been involved in the response to the Izmit, Turkey, earthquake in 1999; the Pentagon in September 2001; and Hurricanes Rita and Katrina in 2005, and Gustav and Ike in 2008. He also participated in the response to the devastating earthquake in January 2010 near Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Dr. Hanfling was integrally involved in the manage- ment of the response to the anthrax bioterror mailings in the fall of 2001, when two cases of inhalational anthrax were successfully diagnosed and managed at Inova Fairfax Hospital. Dr. Hanfling is a founding member of the Northern Virginia Hospital Alliance. He has testified before Congress on the issues of disas- ter preparedness, and lectures nationally and internationally on prehospital-, hospital-, and disaster-related subjects. He served as vice chair of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Committee on Establishing Standards of Care in Disaster Events. Dr. Hanfling received an A.B. in political science from Duke University, and was awarded his medical degree from Brown University. He completed an internship in internal medicine at the Miriam Hospital in Providence, Rhode Island, and an emergency medicine residency at George Washing- ton/Georgetown University Hospitals. He is a clinical professor of emergency medicine at George Wash- ington University, contributing scholar at the UPMC Center for BioSecurity, and adjunct distinguished senior fellow at the George Mason University School of Public Policy. John L. Hick, M.D. (Co-Chair), is a faculty emergency physician at Hennepin County Medical Center (HCMC) and an associate professor of emergency medicine at the University of Minnesota. He serves as the associate medical director for Hennepin County Emergency Medical Services and as medical director for emergency preparedness at HCMC. He also serves the Minnesota Department of Health as the medical director for the Office of Emergency Preparedness. He is the founder and past chair of the Minneapolis/ St. Paul Metropolitan Hospital Compact, a 30-hospital mutual aid and planning group active since 2002. He is involved at many levels of planning for surge capacity and crisis standards of care (CSC) and traveled to Greece to assist its health care system preparations for the 2004 Summer Olympics as part of a 15-mem- 195

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ber Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Department of Health and Human Services (CDC/HHS) team. He has served as a member on IOM committees addressing crisis standards of care and is a national speaker on hospital preparedness issues. He has published numerous papers dealing with surge capacity, hospital preparedness for contaminated casualties, personal protective equipment, crisis care, and response to improvised nuclear device detonations. Sarita Chung, M.D., is the director of disaster preparedness in the Division of Emergency Medicine at Boston Children’s Hospital. Currently, she also serves on the Disaster Preparedness Advisory Council for the American Academy of Pediatrics and the National Advisory Council for FEMA. Trained in pediatrics and pediatric emergency medicine, Dr. Chung is actively involved in all aspects of pediatric emergency pre- paredness, including research, teaching, and clinical care. In terms of her research, Dr. Chung published one of the first post-9/11 articles, examining the efficacy of Web-based training in bioterrorism (at a time when such websites were proliferating, without evidence of their value) and showing that a Web-based educational tool does not enhance the knowledge of emergency physicians. She has gone on to publish important con- cept and research papers on issues of pediatric disaster preparedness such as the role of hospital preparation for disasters involving children, school preparedness, and reunification of children separated from their par- ents after a disaster. In terms of teaching, Dr. Chung is a nationally recognized lecturer on pediatric aspects of disaster preparedness, having presented at federally sponsored workshops and national pediatric meetings. She has also participated in national consensus conferences to discuss disaster preparedness for children. Dr. Chung is an assistant professor of pediatrics at Harvard School of Medicine. Carol Cunningham, M.D., was appointed state medical director for the Ohio Department of Public Safety, Division of EMS, in July 2004 and is a board certified emergency physician at Akron General Medical Center and an assistant professor of emergency medicine at Northeast Ohio Medical University. She is the emergency medical services (EMS) medical director representative on the National EMS Advisory Council ­ (NEMSAC) and the immediate past chairperson of the National Association of State EMS Officials (­ ASEMSO) Medical Directors Council. She also serves on Ohio’s State Medical Coordination Com­ N mittee. Dr. Cunningham received her M.D. and completed an emergency medicine residency at the Univer- sity of Cincinnati. She has 7 years of experience as a flight physician and 11 years as a tactical EMS medical director, and is a fellow in the American College of Emergency Physicians and the American Academy of Emergency Medicine. Dr. Cunningham completed the National Preparedness Leadership Initiative at the Harvard Kennedy School of Executive Education and the Homeland Security Executive Leadership Pro- gram at The Naval Postgraduate School & The U.S. Department of Homeland Security Center for Home- land Defense and Security. She is the 2012 recipient of the American Academy of Emergency Medicine’s James Keaney Leadership Award. Dr. Cunningham was appointed to the EMS Examination Task Force by the American Board of Emergency Medicine as an item writer for the EMS subspecialty examination in addition to her continued duties as an oral board examiner. She is a member of the editorial board of the Journal of EMS, a contributing editor for the EMS Insider, and an ad hoc member of the HHS Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality’s Health Care Technology and Decision Science panel. Dr. Cunningham is the co–principal investigator for the Model EMS Clinical Guidelines project, and the NASEMSO phy- sician representative working with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) on the 196 CRISIS STANDARDS OF CARE: A TOOLKIT FOR INDICATORS AND TRIGGERS

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National EMS Education Standards Implementation Team. She also served as a member of the Education and Workforce Committee of the NEMSAC. She also serves on the EMS Program Steering Committee of the National Fire Academy Board of Visitors, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science & Technology Directorate’s First Responder Resource Group, and the EMS Support Team of the DHS/ FEMA National Integration Center Strategic Resource Group. Brian Flynn, Ed.D., is a consultant, writer, trainer, and speaker specializing in preparation for, response to, and recovery from the psychosocial aspects of large-scale emergencies and disasters. He has served numerous national and international organizations, states, and academic institutions. In addition, he currently serves as associate director of the Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress, and adjunct professor of psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, in Bethesda, Maryland. In 2002, he left federal service as a rear admiral/assistant surgeon general in the Public Health Service. He has directly operated, and supervised the operation of, the federal government’s domestic disaster mental health program (including terrorism) and programs in suicide and youth violence prevention, child trauma, refugee mental health, women’s and minority mental health concerns, and rural mental health. He has served as an adviser to many federal departments and agencies, states, and national professional organiza- tions. He is recognized internationally for his expertise in large-scale trauma and has served as an adviser to ­ ractitioners, academicians, and government officials in many nations. He received his B.A. from North p Carolina ­ esleyan College, his M.A. in clinical psychology from East Carolina University, and his Ed.D. in W mental health administration from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. W. Nim Kidd, CEM, was appointed to the position of assistant director for the Texas Department of Public Safety in 2010. He serves as the chief of the Texas Division of Emergency Management, responsible for the state’s emergency preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation activities. From 2004 to 2010, Chief Kidd served as the emergency manager and homeland security coordinator for the City of San Antonio. He managed the city’s preparedness, response, and recovery efforts for all local disasters, including more than a dozen state, major, and presidential disaster declarations. He has been a member of the Texas Task Force 1 Urban Search and Rescue Team since 1997 and has responded to several state and national disasters, includ- ing the World Trade Center attack in September 2001. Ann R. Knebel, Ph.D., R.N., FAAN, is the deputy director of the National Institute of Nursing Research. Dr. Knebel has been instrumental in advancing various preparedness planning and surge capacity initia- tives. Highlights include developing publications that have had a national impact on preparedness such as a handbook on medical surge capacity and capability, and planning guidance on allocation of scarce resources. Dr. Knebel serves on expert panels that influence international approaches to preparedness, such as a World Health Organization–sponsored virtual advisory group on mass gathering preparedness. Dr. Knebel com- pleted a doctorate of philosophy at the University of California, San Francisco. Her prior experiences include serving in both the intramural and the extramural programs at the National Institutes of Health, with a primary focus on advancing policy initiatives and developing research programs for symptom management, quality of life, and end-of-life issues. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Nursing. APPENDIX C 197

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Linda Scott, R.N., M.A., is the manager of the Healthcare Preparedness Program in the Office of Public Health Preparedness at the Michigan Department of Community Health. She is responsible for coordinat- ing the HHS Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response Hospital Preparedness Program working in collaboration with CDC Public Health Emergency Preparedness activities. Ms. Scott holds a B.S. in nursing and an M.A. in homeland security studies from the Naval Postgraduate School. Anthony H. Speier, Ph.D., is a developmental psychologist. He was trained at the University of Texas in Austin and Louisiana State University. Dr. Speier is assistant secretary for the Office of Behavioral Health in the state of Louisiana’s Department of Health and Hospitals. Before this, he served as the director of Disaster Mental Health Operations for the Louisiana Office of Mental Health, in which capacity he was the principal contact for all federally funded crisis counseling programs addressing the emotional impact of Hurricane Katrina on Louisiana residents. Dr. Speier formerly served as the director of the Division of Pro- gram Development and Implementation for the Louisiana Office of Mental Health. He also led the Office of Mental Health Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Co-Occurring State Incentive Grant project and has been the principal investigator on a number of Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) systems change grants focusing on issues specific to adults with severe and persistent mental ill- ness. In his capacity as the state director for disaster mental health coordination and response activities, Dr. Speier has been the project director for nine federal crisis counseling grants following presidentially declared disasters in Louisiana. He has served as chair of the Adult Services Division of the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors. He is a practicing psychologist in Louisiana and holds a clini- cal appointment at the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center Department of Psychiatry. Dr. Speier has authored a number of publications and training manuals for the CMHS. Jolene R. Whitney, M.P.A., is currently deputy director for the Utah Bureau of EMS and Preparedness, and has served as the state trauma system program manager for more than 20 years. She supervises 22 staff performing various functions related to trauma system development (including stroke and ST-­ levation e myocardial infarction [STEMI]), chemical stockpile emergency preparedness, surge capacity and MCI planning, emergency department, trauma and prehospital databases, EMS licensing and operations, cer- tification and testing processes, critical incident stress management, National Disaster Medical System, EMS medical disaster resources, and the EMS for Children program. She has worked with the Bureau of Emergency Medical Services and Preparedness, Utah Department of Health, for more than 32 years. Ms. Whitney earned her M.P.A. from Brigham Young University and a B.S. in health sciences, with an emphasis in community health education, from the University of Utah. She was certified as an Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) basic in 1979 and obtained certification as an EMT instructor and EMT III (intermediate) in 1983. She has attended numerous conferences, courses, and workshops on EMS, trauma, and disaster planning and response (ICS 100, 200, 300, 700, and 800). Ms. Whitney is a coauthor of six publications pertaining to domestic violence, preventable trauma mortality, Western states rural care chal- lenges, and state and hospital surge capacity planning. Ms. Whitney recently served as an IOM Crisis Stan- dards of Care Committee member in the development of the System Framework for Catastrophic Disaster Response. She also served on the Workshop Planning Committee and as panel chair for the IOM Prepared- ness and Response to a Rural Mass Casualty Incident Workshop. Ms. Whitney has participated on sev- 198 CRISIS STANDARDS OF CARE: A TOOLKIT FOR INDICATORS AND TRIGGERS

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eral national committees and teams, which include state EMS system assessments for NHTSA (­ elaware, D Michigan, Missouri, Ohio, and Oklahoma), American College of Surgeons trauma system assessments (Alaska, Colorado, Louisiana, Minnesota, and Texas), and Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) rural trauma grant reviews. She contributed to the development of the HRSA model trauma sys- tem plan, the NASEMSO trauma system planning guide, the National Trauma Data Standards, and the NHTSA curriculum for an EMT refresher course. She is the previous past chair for the National Council of State Trauma System Managers/NASEMSO and served as vice chair for the previous 3 years. She is a member of the American Trauma Society and the Utah Emergency Managers Association. Previously she was a member of the National Association of State EMS Training Coordinators and Utah Public Health Association. Ms. Whitney spent 250 hours in the Olympic Command Center, serving as a hospital liaison for the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City. Ms. Whitney is currently assisting with the development of Utah-1 Disaster Medical Assistance Team and has recently been hired as a federal intermittent employee for the team, and serves as the acting planning section chief. APPENDIX C 199

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