D

Committee Biosketches

Steven M. Teutsch, M.D., M.P.H. (Chair), became the Chief Science Officer, Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, in February 2009 where he will continue his work on evidence-based public health and policy. He had been in Outcomes Research and Management program at Merck since October 1997 where he was responsible for scientific leadership in developing evidence-based clinical management programs, conducting outcomes research studies, and improving outcomes measurement to enhance quality of care. Prior to joining Merck he was Director of the Division of Prevention Research and Analytic Methods (DPRAM) at Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) where he was responsible for assessing the effectiveness, safety, and the cost-effectiveness of disease and injury prevention strategies. DPRAM developed comparable methodology for studies of the effectiveness and economic impact of prevention programs, provided training in these methods, developed CDC’s capacity for conducting necessary studies, and provided technical assistance for conducting economic and decision analysis. The Division also evaluated the impact of interventions in urban areas, developed the Guide to Community Preventive Services, and provided support for CDC’s analytic methods. He has served as a member of that Task Force and the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, which develops the Guide to Clinical Preventive Services, as well as on America’s Health Information Community Personalized Health Care Workgroup. He chaired the Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Genetics Health and Society, and served on the Evaluation of Genomic Applications in Prevention and Practice Workgroup as well as Institute of Medicine panels. Dr. Teutsch started at CDC in 1977, where he was assigned to the Parasitic Diseases Division and worked extensively on toxoplasmosis. He was then assigned to the Kidney Donor and subsequently the Kidney Disease Pro-



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D Committee Biosketches Steven M. Teutsch, M.D., M.P.H. (Chair), became the Chief Science Officer, Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, in February 2009 where he will continue his work on evidence-based public health and policy. He had been in Outcomes Research and Management pro- gram at Merck since October 1997 where he was responsible for scien- tific leadership in developing evidence-based clinical management programs, conducting outcomes research studies, and improving out- comes measurement to enhance quality of care. Prior to joining Merck he was Director of the Division of Prevention Research and Analytic Meth- ods (DPRAM) at Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) where he was responsible for assessing the effectiveness, safety, and the cost-effectiveness of disease and injury prevention strategies. DPRAM developed comparable methodology for studies of the effectiveness and economic impact of prevention programs, provided training in these methods, developed CDC’s capacity for conducting necessary studies, and provided technical assistance for conducting economic and decision analysis. The Division also evaluated the impact of interventions in ur- ban areas, developed the Guide to Community Preventive Services, and provided support for CDC’s analytic methods. He has served as a mem- ber of that Task Force and the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, which develops the Guide to Clinical Preventive Services, as well as on America’s Health Information Community Personalized Health Care Workgroup. He chaired the Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Genetics Health and Society, and served on the Evaluation of Genomic Applications in Prevention and Practice Workgroup as well as Institute of Medicine pan- els. Dr. Teutsch started at CDC in 1977, where he was assigned to the Para- sitic Diseases Division and worked extensively on toxoplasmosis. He was then assigned to the Kidney Donor and subsequently the Kidney Disease Pro- 109

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110 TOWARD QUALITY MEASURES FOR POPULATION HEALTH gram. He developed the framework for CDC’s diabetes control program. He joined the Epidemiology Program Office and became the Director of the Division of Surveillance and Epidemiology where he was responsible for CDC’s disease monitoring activities. He became Chief of the Preven- tion Effectiveness Activity in 1992. Dr. Teutsch has published more than 150 articles and 6 books in a broad range of fields in epidemiology, in- cluding parasitic diseases, diabetes, technology assessment, health ser- vices research, and surveillance. Kevin Grumbach, M.D., is Professor and Chair of the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). He is Co-Director of the UCSF Center for Excellence in Primary Care and Co-Director of the Community Engagement and Health Policy Program for the UCSF Clinical and Translational Science Institute. His research on topics such as primary care physician supply and access to care, innovations in the delivery of primary care, and racial and ethnic diversity in the health professions have been published in ma- jor medical journals such as the New England Journal of Medicine and JAMA and cited widely in both health policy forums and the general me- dia. With Tom Bodenheimer, he co-authored the best-selling textbook on health policy Understanding Health Policy—A Clinical Approach, and the book Improving Primary Care—Strategies and Tools for a Better Practice, published by McGraw-Hill. He received a Generalist Physician Faculty Scholar award from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Health Resources and Services Administration Award for Health Work- force Research on Diversity, and the Richard E. Cone Award for Excel- lence and Leadership in Cultivating Community Partnerships in Higher Education, and is a member of the Institute of Medicine, National Acad- emy of Sciences. Romana Hasnain-Wynia, Ph.D., is Director, Addressing Disparities, at the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI). Dr. Hasnain-Wynia joined PCORI from Northwestern University, where she directed the Center for Healthcare Equity and was Associate Professor at the Feinberg School of Medicine. Prior to her work at Northwestern, Dr. Hasnain-Wynia served as vice president of research for the Health Re- search and Educational Trust, the research and education affiliate of the American Hospital Association. Dr. Hasnain-Wynia has served as the principal investigator for a number of national studies examining quality of care for underserved populations. She also is a Senior Associate Editor at the journal Health Services Research. She received her Ph.D. in health

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APPENDIX D 111 policy from Brandeis University’s Heller School for Social Policy and Management. Jewel Mullen, M.D., M.P.H., M.P.A. In December 2010, Governor Dannel P. Malloy announced his appointment of Dr. Mullen as Commis- sioner of the Connecticut Department of Public Health (DPH). As Com- missioner, Dr. Mullen oversees the state’s leading public health agency whose mission is to protect and improve the health and safety of Con- necticut residents. Prior to joining the Department, Dr. Mullen was Di- rector of the Bureau of Community Health and Prevention at the Massachusetts DPH. She also is the former medical director of Baystate Mason Square Neighborhood Health Center in Springfield, Massachu- setts. Dr. Mullen began her clinical career as a member of the National Health Service Corps at Bellevue Hospital in New York, after which she joined the medical faculty of the University of Virginia. A Connecticut resident since 1992, she has been a member of the medical staff at the Hospital of St. Raphael, the Yale University Health Services, and Yale New Haven Hospital. Board certified in internal medicine, Dr. Mullen received her bachelor and master of public health degrees from Yale University, where she also completed a postdoctoral fellowship in psychosocial epidemiology. A graduate of the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, she completed her residency at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. She also holds a master in public administration degree from the Harvard University John F. Kennedy School of Government. She brings to her role as Commissioner the recognition that efforts to improve the health of individuals and communities must be informed by an understanding of the social context which determines their behaviors and their access to resources. John Oswald, Ph.D., M.P.H., is Adjunct Assistant Professor in the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota. While maintain- ing his academic appointment, he has worked in Washington, DC, over the past 3 years as Assistant Vice President at the National Association of Public Hospitals and Health Systems in 2011 to early 2013 and as Senior Policy Analyst at the Office of Policy at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in 2010-2011. During this time, he has also been a Lecturer at the Jefferson School of Population Health. Prior to moving to Washington, DC, he was Senior Director of Product Analytics at OptumHealth, a subsidiary of United Healthcare in 2007-2010. Prior to joining OptumHealth, he was the Director of the Center for Health Statis- tics at the Minnesota Department of Health, where he was responsible

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112 TOWARD QUALITY MEASURES FOR POPULATION HEALTH from 1993 through 2007 for program evaluation, vital statistics, and health surveys. He was previously from 1983 to 1992 at HealthPartners, a large Minnesota-based health plan in strategic planning and medical management positions. He obtained a Ph.D. in Health Services Research at the University of Minnesota in 1999 and a Master’s of Public Health from the University of Minnesota in 1984. R. Gibson Parrish, M.D., M.P.H., is currently an independent consult- ant for the Public Health Informatics Institute. Previously, he was Ad- junct Associate Professor of Community and Family Medicine at Dartmouth Medical School and Senior Public Health Scientist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). He is co-author with Daniel Friedman of Shaping a Health Statistics Vision for the 21st Cen- tury, a report of the National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics, and wrote the recently published article, Measuring Population Health Outcomes. While at CDC, he served in the Epidemiology Program Of- fice and was responsible for overseeing notifiable disease surveillance. He also served in the National Center for Environmental Health, where with Dr. Roy Ing he created the medical examiner surveillance system. Two of the many CDC committees on which Dr. Parrish served were the Surveillance Coordinating Group and the Health Information and Sur- veillance System Board. He recently served as a member of the Institute of Medicine Committee on Leading Health Indicators for Healthy People 2020. Greg Randolph, M.D., M.P.H., is Director of the Center for Public Health Quality and is a Professor of Pediatrics and Adjunct Professor of Public Health at the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill. Dr. Randolph has more than 15 years of experience in quality improve- ment (QI) leadership, implementation, and research. He is currently in- volved in a range of QI programs and projects, including leading a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-funded project to create a statewide quality improvement infrastructure for the NC public health system, leading a national initiative to develop a Web-based re- source to assist public health professionals with implementation of evidence-based interventions, assisting the NC Area Health Education Centers’ Statewide Quality Program, and serving as a QI consultant for the American Academy of Pediatrics’ Community Pediatrics Training Initiative. He currently provides QI expertise nationally via serving on the Public Health Accreditation Board’s Evaluation and Quality Im- provement Committee, the American Board of Pediatrics Maintenance of

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APPENDIX D 113 Certification Committee, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Steering Committee for Quality Improvement and Management, and as Editor of the AAP Quality Connections newsletter. He has published ex- tensively on the application of QI and patient safety in health care and public health. Most recently he served as Guest Editor for the Jan/Feb 2012 Journal of Public Health Management and Practice devoted to QI in public health. He has also served as QI faculty for the National Initia- tive for Children’s Healthcare Quality, the New York City Department of Health, and the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. He has assisted the RAND Corporation, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital with various QI initiatives. Dr. Randolph received his M.D./M.P.H. degree from UNC at Chapel Hill, completed a General Academic Pediatric Fellowship and Preventive Medicine Resi- dency at UNC at Chapel Hill, and is a CDC National Public Health Leadership Institute Scholar. Patrick Remington, M.D., M.P.H., is Professor of Population Health Sciences and Associate Dean for Public Health at the School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin (UW)–Madison. He is na- tionally recognized for his work in applying epidemiology at the inter- face between science and practice—culminating in the County Health Rankings, a national program to engage communities in broad-based ef- forts to mobilize citizens toward actions that improve their health. He graduated Phi Beta Kappa from UW with a degree in molecular biology (1976) and was an Alpha Omega Alpha graduate from the UW Medical School (1981). From 1982 to 1988, he served in the U.S. Public Health Service at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), where he was an Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer, completed a Preventive Medicine Residency, and received his M.P.H. (University of Minnesota) as part of CDC’s career development program. While at the CDC, he helped establish the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System now used in every state in the United States. From 1988 to 1997, he was the Chief Medical Officer for Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention in the Wisconsin Division of Health, where he developed and promoted evidence-based interventions in tobacco and breast cancer control, sup- ported by grants from the CDC and the National Cancer Institute. In July 1997, he joined the Department of Population Health Sciences at UW, where his research has focused on methods used to measure the health of communities and communicate this information to the public and policy makers. He is currently co-directing the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation–supported County Health Rankings, a project that ranks the

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114 TOWARD QUALITY MEASURES FOR POPULATION HEALTH health of the counties in all 50 states and examines strategies to improve population health. He has authored or co-authored more than 220 publi- cations, including the American Public Health Association textbook Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Control. As a leader at UW, Dr. Remington established the Population Health Institute, the Master of Public Health Program, and the Comprehensive Cancer Center’s Popula- tion Health Sciences Program. In 2009, he was appointed the inaugural Associate Dean for Public Health, and is leading an effort to establish the nation’s first “transformed school of medicine and public health” inte- grating public health throughout the school’s research, teaching, and service missions. He has received numerous honors recognizing his work, including his selection as the 2010 Langmuir Lecturer at CDC and his appointment to the HHS Healthy People 2020 Federal Advisory Committee. Jane E. Sisk, Ph.D., M.A., is a Scholar in Residence at the Institute of Medicine (IOM), Board of Health Care Services. Before the IOM, she served as Director, Division of Health Care Statistics, National Center for Health Statistics, the federal health statistical agency that is part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, from 2004 to 2011. That Division surveys physicians, hospitals, and other health care providers on their organizational arrangements, patients, and clinical care. Since com- ing to the IOM, Dr. Sisk along with colleagues has drawn from those surveys to publish analyses of physicians’ adoption of electronic health records during the past decade, and are analyzing recent changes in phy- sicians’ organizational and payment arrangements. She also served on the IOM Committee on Geographic Adjustment in Medicare Payment. Dr. Sisk’s research has focused on interventions to improve the quality of care, especially to reduce disparities among population subgroups; eval- uation of Medicaid managed care; and the cost-effectiveness of health care interventions, including pneumococcal and influenza vaccinations for elderly people. She was a tenured professor at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Health Policy, from 1999 to 2009, and at Co- lumbia University, Mailman School of Public Health, Division of Health Policy and Management, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, from 1992 to 1999. Before that, Dr. Sisk was a Senior Asso- ciate and Project Director at the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment. She has served on 10 committees at the IOM, from vaccine development to telehealth, and is on three editorial boards. Dr. Sisk holds a Ph.D. in economics from McGill University, and a B.A. in international relations from Brown University. She has been elected a member of the

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APPENDIX D 115 IOM, National Academy of Sciences; a Fellow of AcademyHealth; and a Fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine. Pierre Vigilance, M.D., M.P.H., is the Associate Dean for Public Health Practice at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services, where he teaches and advises students, oversees the Practicum program, and provides connectivity with local and regional public health practice activities. He serves on a number of committees, and is routinely engaged in business and strategic partnership develop- ment both locally and in the Caribbean. Formerly the Director of the Dis- trict of Columbia Department of Health, when a new mayoral administration took office in January 2011, Dr. Vigilance departed gov- ernment service after almost a decade of local public health practice. During his time as the leader of the public health agency for the nation’s capital, he led the agency’s promotion of health and wellness through innovative physical activity and nutrition projects such as community-level Ward Walks, the Healthy Corner Store Initiative, and Live Well DC. He also supported the development of an ongoing HIV testing, education, and prevention strategy including the Rubber Revolu- tion. Under his leadership, the Department streamlined business process- es, adopted a data-driven decision model, and integrated outcome-driven performance management into all practices and initiatives. His focus on telling the story led to the publication of the District’s first HIV/AIDS Epidemiology Reports; the Preventable Causes of Death Report (the first city-level report ever produced); the Obesity Report; and the Obesity Action Plan. Prior to his appointment in the District of Columbia, Dr. Vigilance served in public health leadership roles in Baltimore City and Baltimore County, Maryland. As Baltimore City’s Assistant Health Commissioner, he directed an aggressive HIV outreach and education campaign “Live, Love, Be Safe,” which resulted in increased awareness of HIV/AIDS in Baltimore City. He continues to serve as an advocate for expanded access to HIV testing, and de-stigmatization of HIV/AIDS, and participated in the 2010 International AIDS Society conference in Vien- na, Austria. Trained in emergency response, his emergency preparedness policy and investigation experience includes Sudden Acute Respiratory Syndrome, tuberculosis, H1N1, multiple vaccination clinics, and lo- cal/state preparedness exercises, as well as the public health planning for the 44th Presidential Inauguration. Before entering the government, his work focused on the development of a community-based substance abuse program along with other social justice–oriented community-based inter- ventions in East Baltimore. Dr. Vigilance received his M.D. and M.P.H.

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116 TOWARD QUALITY MEASURES FOR POPULATION HEALTH degrees from Johns Hopkins University and is residency-trained in emergency medicine. In addition to George Washington, he has served on faculty at the Johns Hopkins and Georgetown Universities. He is an active member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Incorporated, an inductee of the Alpha chapter of Delta Omega at Johns Hopkins University, and a member of Leadership Greater Washington.