Appendix A

Agenda

NAE-USIP Roundtable: Workshop on Sensing andShaping Emerging Conflicts

October 11, 2012

National Academy of Sciences
2101 Constitution Avenue NW, Room 120
Washington, DC

The Objective of this Workshop is to identify major opportunities and impediments to providing better real-time information to actors directly involved in situations that could lead to deadly violence. We will consider several scenarios of potential violence drawn from recent country cases, and consider a set of technologies, applications, and strategies that have been particularly useful—or could be, if better adapted for conflict prevention or mitigation by people in a position to do so.

AGENDA

8:30 a.m. Breakfast
 
8:45 a.m. Roundtable Charge to the Workshop
By the end of the day, we seek to identify promising strategies for direct application of technology tools and techniques to emerging conflicts. The goal is to provide insights and information to inform the design of field tests of collaboration between local actors, supportive peacebuilders, and expert technologists to increase the constructive impacts of sensing technologies and applications.
Roundtable Advisor: Fred Tipson, USIP
 


The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 51
Appendix A Agenda NAE-USIP Roundtable: Workshop on Sensing and Shaping Emerging Conflicts October 11, 2012 National Academy of Sciences 2101 Constitution Avenue NW, Room 120 Washington, DC The Objective of this Workshop is to identify major opportunities and impediments to providing better real-time information to actors directly involved in situations that could lead to deadly violence. We will consider several scenarios of potential violence drawn from recent country cases, and consider a set of technologies, applications, and strategies that have been particularly useful—or could be, if better adapted for conflict prevention or mitigation by people in a position to do so. AGENDA 8:30 a.m. Breakfast 8:45 a.m. Roundtable Charge to the Workshop  the day, we seek to identify promising By the end of strategies for direct application of technology tools and techniques to emerging conflicts. The goal is to provide insights and information to inform the design of field tests of collaboration between local actors, supportive peacebuilders, and expert technologists to increase the constructive impacts of sensing technologies and applications. Roundtable Advisor: Fred Tipson, USIP 51

OCR for page 51
52 SENSING AND SHAPING EMERGING CONFLICTS 9:00 a.m. “Peacebuilders” Meet “Data Scientists”  How can various sensing technologies assist local populations and peacebuilders in zones of conflict or potential conflict to anticipate, understand, and prevent deadly violence? Candidate Peacebuilding Problems/Settings Joint Presentation: Lawrence Woocher, SAIC Dennis King, State Department Fred Tipson, USIP Candidate Technologies: Joint Presentation: Prabhakar Raghavan, Google Duncan Watts, Microsoft  Patrick Vinck, Harvard Humanitarian Initiative 10:30 a.m. Break 10:45 a.m. Recent Experience in Zones of Tension/Conflict  How was technology used by local actors, whether citizens, government agencies, or outsiders, to understand their situations and influence the outcomes of events? Speakers: Patrick Meier, Ushahidi (Kenya)  Sanjana Hattotuwa, ICT4Peace (Sri Lanka) Moderator: Lawrence Woocher, SAIC 12:15 p.m. Lunch and PeaceTech Lab Presentation Speaker: Sheldon Himelfarb, USIP 1:00 p.m. Factors Affecting the Use of Technologies in Conflict Settings  What is the process, whether facilitated or not by outsiders, by which technologies are adopted/adapted in local settings? What are the challenges these capabilities could best address? Speakers:  Chris Spence, National Democratic Institute Emmanuel Letouzé, UN Global Pulse Commentator: Joseph Bock, University of Notre Dame Moderator: Prabhakar Raghavan, Google

OCR for page 51
APPENDIX A 53 2:30 p.m. Break 2:45 p.m. The Darker Side of Technologies Used to Sense Conflict  all of the potential benefits of various technologies in For facilitating political participation and change, various actors may take advantage of these very capabilities to repress change and even provoke deadly violence. What are the ways that repressive governments or reactionary groups have exploited technologies (or might do so) to stifle expression or target activists, and how can these “darker” uses be prevented or mitigated? Speakers: Ivan Sigal, Global Voices Rafal Rohozinski, The SecDev Group Moderator: Lawrence Woocher, SAIC 4:15 p.m. Next Steps 5:00 p.m. Adjourn

OCR for page 51