D

Committee Member Biographies

Bertrand I. Halperin, Chair, is the Hollis Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy at Harvard University and a professor of physics. His current research involves the theory of electron states and transport in structures of semiconductor or metal with restricted geometries, and topological aspects of condensed matter systems. Focus areas include the properties of two-dimensional electron systems at low temperatures in strong magnetic fields and the physics of interacting electron and nuclear spins in nanoscale semiconductor devices. Previous research interests included transport in inhomogeneous systems, quantum magnets and one-dimensional metals, low-temperature properties of glasses, melting and other phase transitions in two-dimensional systems, and the theory of dynamic phenomena near a phase transition. Dr. Halperin is a member of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and of the American Philosophical Society and is a fellow of the American Physical Society (APS) and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He was the recipient of the Lars Onsager Medal and Lecture (2009) of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, the Dannie Heineman Prize of the Göttingen Akademie der Wissenschaften (2007), the Wolf Prize in Physics (2003), and the Lars Onsager Prize (2001) and the Oliver Buckley Prize (1982) of the APS.

Gabriel Aeppli is the Quain Professor of Physics and director of the London Centre for Nanotechnology. He obtained a B.Sc. in mathematics and Ph.D., M.Sc. and B.Sc. degrees in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Prior to taking up his current posts in the autumn of 2002, he was a senior research scientist for NEC Laboratories America, a Distinguished Member of the



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D Committee Member Biographies Bertrand I. Halperin, Chair, is the Hollis Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy at Harvard University and a professor of physics. His current research involves the theory of electron states and transport in structures of semiconductor or metal with restricted geometries, and topological aspects of condensed matter systems. Focus areas include the properties of two-dimensional electron systems at low temperatures in strong magnetic fields and the physics of interacting electron and nuclear spins in nanoscale semiconductor devices. Previous research interests included transport in inhomogeneous systems, quantum magnets and one-dimen- sional metals, low-temperature properties of glasses, melting and other phase tran- sitions in two-dimensional systems, and the theory of dynamic phenomena near a phase transition. Dr. Halperin is a member of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and of the American Philosophical Society and is a fellow of the American Physical Society (APS) and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He was the recipient of the Lars Onsager Medal and Lecture (2009) of the Norwegian Uni- versity of Science and Technology, the Dannie Heineman Prize of the Göttingen Akademie der Wissenschaften (2007), the Wolf Prize in Physics (2003), and the Lars Onsager Prize (2001) and the Oliver Buckley Prize (1982) of the APS. Gabriel Aeppli is the Quain Professor of Physics and director of the London Centre for Nanotechnology. He obtained a B.Sc. in mathematics and Ph.D., M.Sc. and B.Sc. degrees in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Prior to taking up his current posts in the autumn of 2002, he was a senior research scientist for NEC Laboratories America, a Distinguished Member of the 178

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A pp e n d i x D 179 Technical Staff at Bell Laboratories, a research assistant at MIT, and an industrial co-op student at IBM. Honors include a fellowship of the Royal Society (2010), the Institute of Physics Mott Prize (2008), the APS Oliver Buckley Prize (2005), the Majumdar Memorial Award of the Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science (2005), the IUPAP Magnetism Prize/Neel Medal (2003), Riso National Laboratory fellow (2002), Royal Society Wolfson Research Merit Award (2002), fellow of the APS (1997), and fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (1996). In addition, he has been a member and chair of many panels sponsored by the DOE, APS, Engineering and Physical Science Research Council (EPSRC) (U.K.), and the National Research Council, among others. Dr. Aeppli’s experience and involve- ment with nanotechnology are both managerial and scientific. He cofounded the interdisciplinary and interuniversity (Imperial and University Colleges) London Centre for Nanotechnology (LCN), developed its overall problem-solving strategy, arranged for the procurement of a new laboratory/office facility dedicated to nano- technology in central London, defined the operating model in collaboration with colleagues at both colleges, and is now managing operations and future programme development. His personal research is currently focused on the implications of nanotechnology for information processing and health care. He is also a cofounder of Bio-Nano Consulting (BNC), a firm spun off from the LCN and the Institute for Bio-Engineering at Imperial College, which provides a range of services from due diligence to testing and prototyping in the nanotechnology arena. Yoichi Ando is a professor of quantum functional materials at the Institute of Scientific and Industrial Resarch at Osaka University. He received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in physics from the University of Tokyo. Dr. Ando’s resarch is foucsed on materials presenting useful functionalities based on novel quantum-mechancal principles, such as high-temperature superconductors and topological insulators. To uncover the operating principles of those materials, his group grows high- quality single crystals and characterizes their transport and thermodynamic prop- erties down to very low temperatures in high magnetic fields. He did his postdoc at Bell Laboratories and then led a research group at the Central Research Institute of the Electric Power Industry in Japan. He moved to Osaka University to found an interdisciplinary laboratory where physicists and chemists work together to reveal novel aspects of superconductors and semiconductors. Dr. Ando received the Superconductivity Science and Technology Award and the JSPS Prize. He is currently a coeditor of Europhysics Letters. Meigan Aronson is a professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Stony Brook University, as well as a group leader of the Correlated Electron Materi- als Group in the Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. She received her A.B. from Bryn Mawr College

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180 High Magnetic Field Science and I t s A pp l i c a t i o n in the US and M.S and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Subsequently, she held a postdoc at Los Alamos National Laboratory and a visit- ing appointment at the University of Amsterdam before joining the faculty of the Physics Department at the University of Michigan as an assistant professor in 1990. After receiving tenure in 1996, and being promoted to professor of physics in 2000, she served as associate dean for natural sciences in the College of Literature, Sci- ence, and Arts from 2004 to 2006. She moved to her current appointments at Stony Brook University and Brookhaven National Laboratory in 2007. Her research in experimental condensed matter physics focus on the interplay of superconductiv- ity and magnetism with electronic delocalization in systems with strong electronic correlations like heavy fermions and transition-metal-based systems like the iron pnictides and chalcogenides. She is a fellow of the APS and the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC) and has received a National Security Science and Engineering Faculty fellowship. Dimitri Basov is the chair of the Department of Physics at the University of Califor- nia, San Diego. He received an M.S. from the Moscow Engineering Physics Institute and a Ph.D. from the Lebedev Physics Institute, Academy of Sciences of Russia. He was a postdoctoral research associate at the University of Regensburg and McMaster University and held an assistant physicist appointment at Brookhaven National Laboratory. He joined the faculty of the University of California, San Diego, as an assistant professor and was promoted to professor in 2001. His research involves the use of infrared spectroscopy to study the physics of a wide range of materi- als, including strongly correlated materials, magnetic semiconductors, molecular and organic nano-electronics, electromagnetic metamaterials, superconductivity, memristors, and charge dynamics in graphene. Dr. Basov has received the Frank Isakson Prize for Optical Effects in Solids of the APS, a Humboldt Research Award, and the Ludwig Genzel Prize, among others. He is a fellow of the APS. Thomas F. Budinger (NAE, IOM) is a professor emeritus at the graduate school of the University of California, Berkeley (UC Berkeley), as well as professor and chair of the Department of Bioengineering and Professor in Residence, University of California, San Francisco, and department head, Department of Nuclear Medi- cine and Functional Imaging, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), professor emeritus of the Department of Radiology at the University of California, San Francisco, and senior faculty scientist in the Department of Nuclear Medicine and Functional Imaging at LBNL. He received his B.S. in chemistry from Regis College, an M.S. in physical oceanography from the University of Washington, Seattle, an M.D. from the University of Colorado, and a Ph.D. in medical physics from UC Berkeley. He has received numerous honors and awards for his research

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A pp e n d i x D 181 contributions to nuclear medicine and imaging techniques and was elected as a member to the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) in 1996. Robert Dimeo is the director of the National Institute of Standards and Technol- ogy’s (NIST) Center for Neutron Research (NCNR), a national user facility for neutron scattering on the NIST Gaithersburg campus. Dr. Dimeo received an M.S. in electrical engineering in 1994 and a Ph.D. in physics from the Pennsylvania State University in 1999. His research interests include the dynamics of quantum fluids, quantum rotations in molecular solids, software development for the visualization and analysis of neutron scattering data, and the development of neutron instru- mentation. Dr. Dimeo served as the Assistant Director for Physical Sciences and Engineering at the Office of Science and Technology Policy from 2005 until 2007. He was responsible for working on policy matters involving major research facilities in materials science, interagency cooperation on large-scale research activities, and other interagency working groups. John C. Gore (NAE) is the director of the Institute of Imaging Science and the Hertha Ramsey Cress University Professor of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Biomedical Engineering, Physics and Astronomy, and Molecular Physiology and Biophysics at Vanderbilt University. Dr. Gore obtained his Ph.D. in physics at the University of London in the U.K. in 1976 and has been an active leader in imag- ing research and applications for over 30 years. He also holds a degree in law. In addition to being an elected member of the NAE, he is also an elected fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering, the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM), and the Institute of Physics (U.K.). In 2004 Dr. Gore was awarded the Gold Medal of the ISMRM for his contributions to the field of magnetic resonance imaging. He has served twice as a trustee of the ISMRM and is editor in chief of Magnetic Resonance Imaging. He is currently a member of the National Advisory Council for Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). He has published over 500 original papers and contributions within the medical imaging field. His research interests include the development and application of imaging methods for understanding tissue physiology and structure, molecular imaging, and functional brain imaging. Frank Hunte is an assistant professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at North Carolina State University (NCSU). He received B.S. and M.S. degrees in physics from Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University and a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Minnesota. Prior to coming to NCSU he was a visiting assistant scholar/scientist at the Applied Superconductivity Center in the Magnets and Materials Division of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

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182 High Magnetic Field Science and I t s A pp l i c a t i o n in the US at Florida State University. His research investigates magnetic materials and thin film heterostructures, including semiconductors and superconductors, processing methods, functionality, and operating environments (thermal, mechanical, elec- tromagnetic), from basic materials physics to technological applications. He is cur- rently focused on dilute magnetic semiconductors, which retain ferromagnetism at room temperature, and memristors. Hunte also studies the relationship between magnetism and superconductivity in the iron-based unconventional multiband superconductors, where magnetic correlations appear strongly. His experimental research employs characterization methods including magnetotransport, mag- netometry, XRD, microscopy (SEM, AFM, MFM), and magneto-optical imaging (MOI). Chung Ning (Jeanie) Lau is an associate professor of physics at the University of California, Riverside (UCR). She received her B.A. from the University of Chicago and her Ph.D. from Harvard University. Before joining UCR in 2004 as an assistant professor, she was a research associate at Hewlett-Packard Laboratories in Palo Alto, California. Her research interests center on the thermal, electrical, and mechanical properties of carbon nanomaterials. She is recipient of the NSF CAREER award and the 2008 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers. Jan Cornelis Maan is a professor in experimental solid state physics and director of the Nijmegen High Field Magnet Laboratory (HFML). He received a B.S. in physics engineering from Delft Technical University and a Ph.D. in solid state physics from the University of Nijmegen. His research interests include fundamental properties of condensed matter in high magnetic fields, with emphasis on transport measure- ments and optical spectroscopy (visible to far infrared), as well as manipulation and study of molecular materials with magnetic fields. He has coauthored more than 340 publications (cited more than 5,000 times) in refereed journals or invited book contributions. In 2003 he was appointed Ridder in de Orde van de Nederlandse Leeuw (Knight in the Order of the Dutch Lion) by the Queen of the Netherlands, for the realization of the new HFML. Ann E. McDermott is a professor of chemistry at Columbia University. She received a B.Sc. in chemistry from Harvey Mudd College and a Ph.D. in chemistry from UC Berkeley. Her research group studies the mechanisms of several enzymes, principally through solid-state NMR spectroscopy. She has studied the opening of the active site flexible loop of the glycolytic enzyme, triosephosphate isomer- ase, and its coupling to the appearance of product, using a range of biophysical probes. The compressed “non-bonded” interactions of the prereactive substrate on the active site of this enzyme, and the conformational dynamics, have been experimentally probed at high resolution. Analogous studies are under way for

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A pp e n d i x D 183 bacterial cytochrome P450, where conformational flexibility impacts the range of chemistry carried out by the enzyme. These studies involve recent advances in high- resolution solid-state NMR spectra of uniformly or selectively isotopically enriched proteins wherein site-specific assignments allow for efficient structural, dynamic, and mechanistic studies. She also studies the photosynthetic reaction center and demonstrated for the first time a coherent quantum mechanical-photochemical mechanism for enhancement of NMR detection sensitivity by three orders of magnitude involving the primary players of electron transfer. Joseph Minervini is division head for technology and engineering in the Plasma Science and Fusion Center at the MIT. He also holds an academic appointment as senior research engineer in the Nuclear Science and Engineering Department at MIT, where he teaches a course and supervises graduate student research. Dr. Minervini received his master’s and Ph.D. in mechnical engineering from MIT. Dr. Minervini has played a leading role in the field of large-scale applications of super- conductors for more than 30 years. His research interests include applied super- conductivity, electromagnetics, cryogenic heat transfer, supercritical helium fluid dynamics, and low-temperature measurements. Dr. Minervini served as principal investigator for the US ITER magnetics R&D program, and a major achievement of the engineering design activity (EDA) was the design, fabrication, and testing of the Central Solenoid Model Coil, the world’s largest and most powerful pulsed superconducting magnet. He now serves as spokesperson for the U.S. Magnetics Program organized under the Virtual Laboratory for Technology of the DOE Office of Fusion Energy Science (OFES). Dr. Minervini has worked on magnet systems for nearly every major application of large-scale superconductivity, including fusion energy, magnetic levitation, energy storage, power generation and transmission, magnetic separation, and high-energy and nuclear physics, as well as medical applications. He has management and technical responsibility for an interdisci- plinary division of approximately 20 engineers, technicians, and students devoted to magnet technology and engineering and development of advanced applications of superconductivity. Arthur Ramirez is the dean of the Jack Baskin School of Engineering at the Uni- versity of California at Santa Cruz and previously was director of the condensed matter physics department at Bell Laboratories of Lucent Technologies, leader of the Materials Integration Science Laboratory at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and co-director for the University of California’s Institute for Complex Adaptive Matter. Dr. Ramirez received his Ph.D. in physics from Yale University in 1984. His research interests in experimental condensed matter physics include low- dimensional magnetism, heavy fermion systems, thermoelectric materials, colos- sal magnetoresistive materials, high dielectric constant materials, geometrically

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184 High Magnetic Field Science and I t s A pp l i c a t i o n in the US frustrated systems, molecular electronics, and superconductivity in various systems including molecular compounds, intermetallics, and oxides. Dr. Ramirez is a fel- low of the APS and has served in a number of positions with the APS’s Division of Condensed Matter Physics. Zlatko B. Tesanovic was a professor in the Henry A. Rowland Department of Phys- ics and Astronomy of the Johns Hopkins University (JHU) until his death on July 26, 2012. Previously, he served as director of the TIPAC Theory Center at JHU. He received a B.Sci. in physics from the University of Sarajevo, Yugoslavia, and a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Minnesota. His research interests were in theoreti- cal condensed matter physics, revolving primarily around iron- and copper-based high-temperature superconductors and related materials, quantum Hall effects, and other manifestations of strong correlations and emergent behavior in quantum many-particle systems. He was a foreign member of the Royal Norwegian Society of Sciences and Letters and a fellow of the APS Division of Condensed Matter Physics. He gave more than 100 invited talks at scientific meetings, including major international conferences, and authored more than 120 journal articles. Robert Tycko is senior investigator in the Laboratory of Chemical Physics of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, NIH. His research focuses primarily on solid-state NMR spectroscopy and its applications in biophysics and structural biology. Current research includes structural studies of amyloid fibrils and proteins and peptide/protein complexes associated with HIV. Dr. Tycko received the APS’s Earle K. Plyler Prize for Molecular Spectroscopy in 2005, the Chemical Society of Washington’s Hillebrand Prize in 2007, and an NIH Director’s Award in 2001. He is a fellow of the APS, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the International Society of Magnetic Resonance. Dr. Tycko has served on the editorial boards of the Journal of Chemical Physics, the Journal of Magnetic Resonance, the Journal of Biomolecular NMR, and Molecular Physics and chaired the Gordon Research Conference on Magnetic Resonance in 2001.