E


Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff

Ellen Wright Clayton, J.D., M.D. (Co-Chair), is an internationally respected leader in the field of law and genetics who holds appointments in both the law and medical schools at Vanderbilt and the Center for Biomedical Ethics and Society. She has published two books and more than 100 scholarly articles and chapters in medical journals, interdisciplinary journals, and law journals on the intersection of law, ethics, medicine, and public health. In addition, she has collaborated with faculty and students throughout Vanderbilt and in many institutions around the country and the world on interdisciplinary research projects, and helped to develop policy statements for numerous national and international organizations. An active participant in policy debates, she has advised the National Institutes of Health as well as other federal and international bodies on an array of topics ranging from children’s health to the ethical conduct of research involving human subjects. Dr. Clayton has worked on a number of projects for the Institute of Medicine, and is currently a member of its National Advisory Council as well as chair of the Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice. She is a general pediatrician with experience in the evaluation of child abuse and neglect and taught family law for many years.

Richard D. Krugman, M.D. (Co-Chair), is vice chancellor for health affairs for the University of Colorado. In this role, he supports the deans of the Schools of Dental Medicine, Pharmacy, and Public Health; the College of Nursing; and the Graduate School for the Health Sciences while also serving as dean of the School of Medicine. He oversees all clinical programs of the



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 439
E Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff Ellen Wright Clayton, J.D., M.D. (Co-Chair), is an internationally respected leader in the field of law and genetics who holds appointments in both the law and medical schools at Vanderbilt and the Center for Biomedical Eth- ics and Society. She has published two books and more than 100 scholarly articles and chapters in medical journals, interdisciplinary journals, and law journals on the intersection of law, ethics, medicine, and public health. In addition, she has collaborated with faculty and students throughout Vanderbilt and in many institutions around the country and the world on interdisciplinary research projects, and helped to develop policy statements for numerous national and international organizations. An active partici- pant in policy debates, she has advised the National Institutes of Health as well as other federal and international bodies on an array of topics ranging from children’s health to the ethical conduct of research involving human subjects. Dr. Clayton has worked on a number of projects for the Institute of Medicine, and is currently a member of its National Advisory Council as well as chair of the Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice. She is a general pediatrician with experience in the evaluation of child abuse and neglect and taught family law for many years. Richard D. Krugman, M.D. (Co-Chair), is vice chancellor for health affairs for the University of Colorado. In this role, he supports the deans of the Schools of Dental Medicine, Pharmacy, and Public Health; the College of Nursing; and the Graduate School for the Health Sciences while also serving as dean of the School of Medicine. He oversees all clinical programs of the 439

OCR for page 439
440 Commercial Sexual Exploitation and Sex Trafficking of Minors university at its five affiliated hospitals; the Center on Aging, the Center of Bioethics and Humanities, the Colorado Area Health Education System, and Risk Management also report to him. Dr. Krugman became dean of the University of Colorado School of Medicine in 1992 after serving as act- ing dean for 20 months. Prior to becoming dean, he was vice chairman for clinical affairs in the Department of Pediatrics and director of the C. Henry Kempe National Center for the Prevention and Treatment of Child Abuse and Neglect. He is past president of the International Society for the Pre- vention of Child Abuse and Neglect (1992-1994) and was editor-in-chief of Child Abuse & Neglect: The International Journal from 1986 to 2001. He chaired the U.S. Advisory Board on Child Abuse and Neglect from 1989 to 1991. Dr. Krugman is a member of the Institute of Medicine and currently serves on the boards of the University of Colorado Hospital and Children’s Hospital Colorado, among others. He earned his medical degree at New York University School of Medicine. Tonya Chaffee, M.D., M.P.H., is associate clinical professor of pediatrics at the University of California, San Francisco, where she is director of the Teen and Young Adult Health Center and Medical Director of the Child and Adolescent Sexual Abuse Resource Center at San Francisco General Hospital. Dr. Chaffee completed her pediatric residency, chief residency, and subspecialty fellowship training in adolescent medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. She subsequently completed an academic fellow- ship in violence prevention, through the California Wellness Foundation, at San Francisco General Hospital. During this fellowship, she earned an M.P.H. at the University of California, Berkeley, while conducting research and policy work in violence prevention, including research pertaining to training providers in the prevention of youth violence. Angela Diaz, M.D., M.P.H., is a professor in the Department of Pediatrics and Department of Preventive Medicine at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, where she is responsible for the Division of Adolescent Medi- cine. She is also director of the Mount Sinai Adolescent Health Center. Dr. Diaz served as a White House fellow in 1994-1995, examining health care policies in the U.S. territories in the Pacific and the Caribbean. She has been involved in issues of international health, as well as advocacy issues and policy in the United States. Her research has covered adolescent sexual and reproductive health, childhood sexual victimization, and human papil- loma virus (HPV). Dr. Diaz is a member of the Institute of Medicine and has served on multiple committees. She received her M.D. from Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and her M.P.H. from Har- vard University.

OCR for page 439
Appendix E 441 Abigail English, J.D., is director of the Center for Adolescent Health & the Law, a nonprofit organization in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. For more than three decades her research and policy interests have focused on the health of adolescents and young adults and their access to comprehensive health care. Her expertise includes health insurance and public financing of care, consent, and confidentiality. Her work emphasizes the needs of vulnerable young people. As the 2010-2011 Frieda L. Miller fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, she initiated a new decade-long project, “Sexual Exploitation and Trafficking of Adolescents: Health, Law, and Human Rights,” in an effort to understand the devastating physical and emotional effects of sexual exploitation and trafficking on the development, health, and well-being of young victims and to identify potential remedies. Her research draws on laws, treaties, and human rights documents, as well as key sources in adolescent health and development, philosophy, journal- ism, literature, poetry, art, and film. She is exploring ways in which lawyers and health care professionals can collaborate to develop and implement policy recommendations—and ways in which to engage the general pub- lic—to reduce the sexual trafficking and exploitation of adolescents and young adults and to protect the health and safety of those who have been victimized. Ms. English received her undergraduate degree in philosophy and government from Radcliffe College, Harvard University, and her law degree from Boalt Hall School of Law, University of California, Berkeley. She was a Gallagher lecturer for the Society for Adolescent Health & Medi- cine in 1987. She received the Child Advocacy Award from the American Bar Association’s Young Lawyers Division in 1997 and the Outstanding Achievement Award in Adolescent Medicine from the Society for Adoles- cent Health & Medicine in 2000. Barbara Guthrie, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., is associate dean for academic affairs and Independence Foundation professor of nursing at the Yale University School of Nursing. Dr. Guthrie received her bachelor’s degree in nursing from Boston University; her master of science degree in nursing (in family health) from Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and her Ph.D. from the New York University School of Nursing. Prior to accepting the position at Yale University School of Nursing, Dr. Guthrie held a dual appointment at the University of Michigan as an associate professor in the Division of Health Promotion and Risk Reduction and Women Studies. Dr. Guthrie also was director for undergraduate tradi- tional and nontraditional nursing programs at Michigan and was associ- ate director of a Women’s Health Disparities Interdisciplinary Training Grant funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research. Dr. Guthrie’s research and practice have focused on understanding and developing

OCR for page 439
442 Commercial Sexual Exploitation and Sex Trafficking of Minors gender- and ethnic-responsive health promotion programs for adolescent girls within the context of schools, urban neighborhoods, and the juvenile justice system. Her collaborative research efforts with adolescent females have led to her receiving funding from such agencies as the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the National Cancer Institute, the National In- stitute for Nursing Research, the National Institute of Mental Health, the Josiah Macy Foundation, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Her current research is examining the intergenerational influences, behaviors, and patterns of contact with criminal justice systems between women and their children, especially their daughters. Her publications have focused on understanding the intersectional influences of ethnicity, social position, education level, daily hassles, and perceptions of racism and discrimina- tion on African American girls’ health and well-being. Sharon Lambert, Ph.D., is a clinical and community psychologist with specializations in developmental and quantitative psychology. Her primary research interests are in understanding the nature and course of internal- izing problems among urban and African American adolescents and in understanding how the different contexts of development, particularly the neighborhood environment, contribute to child and adolescent adjustment. Much of her work focuses on how youth and families manage neighbor- hood (e.g., community violence) and race-related (e.g., discrimination) stressors. Dr. Lambert also has interests in the application of advanced statistical methods to understand the development of psychopathology and in the role of contexts in development. She is committed to ensuring that her research in each of these areas informs the development and evaluation of preventive interventions for children and adolescents. Mark Latonero, Ph.D., is research director and deputy managing direc- tor at the Annenberg Center on Communication Leadership & Policy and research assistant professor at the University of Southern California (USC). Dr. Latonero’s research examines the intersection of communication technology, social change, and human rights. In partnership with the USC Information Sciences Institute, he is researching and developing technolo- gies that disrupt the social dynamics of the sex trafficking trade and that leverage real-time data to provide actionable information for countertraf- ficking efforts. USC Annenberg’s technology and human trafficking initia- tive also promotes collaboration across the private and public sectors. Dr. Latonero served as a member of the California attorney general’s task force on human trafficking. He has published in such journals as Information, Communication & Society; International Journal of Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management; and Communication Research. He

OCR for page 439
Appendix E 443 received his Ph.D. from the USC Annenberg School for Communication and was a postdoctoral research scholar at the London School of Economics. Natalie McClain, Ph.D., R.N., C.P.N.P., has been working in the field of pediatric nursing since graduating with a bachelor of science degree in nurs- ing. After graduating with a master of science degree in nursing from the University of Texas Health Science Center Houston, she worked at the Chil- dren’s Assessment Center, an advocacy center providing services for child victims of sexual abuse in Houston, Texas. At the assessment center and later in Charlottesville, Virginia, Dr. McClain performed medical forensic exams in cases of sexual assault, testified in both civil and criminal trials, and served as an expert witness for the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). In 2004, she received her Ph.D. from the University of Virginia. Dr. McClain’s clinical experience and research are in the area of forensic nurs- ing, more specifically, improving outcomes for victims of sexual violence and child maltreatment. She is currently an assistant professor at Boston College’s William F. Connell School of Nursing in Boston, Massachusetts. Callie Marie Rennison, Ph.D., is associate professor in the School of Pub- lic Affairs at the University of Colorado Denver. Her research focuses on the nature, extent, and consequences of violent victimization, with an emphasis on research methodology, quantitative analysis, and measure- ment, especially with regard to the National Crime Victimization Survey. Substantively, Dr. Rennison’s research examines violence against women, violence against minority groups such as African Americans and Hispan- ics, crime data, and victim interaction with the criminal justice system. She earned her Ph.D. in political science in 1997 from the University of Hous- ton, University Park; her B.S. in psychology, M.A. in sociology, and M.A. in political science came from the same institution. Dr. Rennison’s research has appeared in journals including the Journal of Quantitative Criminol- ogy, Justice Quarterly, Violence and Victims, and Violence Against Women. Prior to coming to Colorado, she served on the faculty in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Missouri, St. Louis. Before that, she served as a statistician in the Victimization Statistics Unit of the Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Statistics in Washington, DC. From 2004 to 2006, Dr. Rennison was also a postdoctoral fellow with the National Consortium on Violence Research. She teaches a variety of undergraduate and graduate courses, including Research Methods, Murder in America, Crime and the Media, Violence Against Women, Introduction to Criminal Justice, Victimology, and Women and Crime. John A. Rich, M.D., M.P.H., is professor and chair of health management and policy at the Drexel University School of Public Health. He is also

OCR for page 439
444 Commercial Sexual Exploitation and Sex Trafficking of Minors director of the Center for Nonviolence and Justice at Drexel. His work has focused on African American men in urban settings. In 2006, Dr. Rich was granted a MacArthur fellowship in recognition of his work to design “new models of health care that stretch across the boundaries of public health, education, social service, and justice systems to engage young men in caring for themselves and their peers.” Prior to arriving at Drexel University, Dr. Rich served as medical director of the Boston Public Health Commission. As a primary care doctor at Boston Medical Center, he created the Young Men’s Health Clinic and initiated the Boston HealthCREW, a program to train inner-city young men to become peer health educators. Dr. Rich is the author of a book on urban violence titled Wrong Place, Wrong Time: Trauma and Violence in the Lives of Young Black Men (The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009). He is a member of the Institute of Medicine. He earned his A.B. degree in English from Dartmouth College, his M.D. from Duke University School of Medicine, and his M.P.H. from the Harvard School of Public Health. Jonathan Todres, J.D., is associate professor of law at Georgia State Univer- sity College of Law. He researches and writes on a range of children’s rights issues. Professor Todres’ research focuses primarily on vulnerable popula- tions and on trafficking and commercial sexual exploitation of children. His research interests also include domestic interpretations of international human rights law, the interrelationships among rights, and economic and social rights issues. Professor Todres is the author of numerous publications on children’s rights and the trafficking and commercial sexual exploitation of children. He lectures frequently on children’s rights issues, and has testi- fied before the U.N. Committee on the Rights of the Child and presented at congressional briefings in the U.S. House of Representatives and U.S. Senate on trafficking and commercial sexual exploitation of children. He serves as a regular advisor to nongovernmental organizations working on children’s rights issues, including as child rights advisor to ECPAT-USA. He previously served as chair of the International Health Law Committee of the American Bar Association’s Section of International Law and as vice- chair of the section’s International Human Rights Committee. Professor Todres is a fellow of the American Bar Foundation. He previously taught at New York University School of Law and Cardozo School of Law of Yeshiva University, and has been a visiting professor of human rights law at Vytautas Magnus University School of Law in Lithuania. He received his B.A. (international development) from Clark University and his J.D. from Columbia Law School. Professor Todres teaches courses on children’s rights, health law, and torts.

OCR for page 439
Appendix E 445 Patti Toth, J.D., has been child abuse program manager for Washington State’s Criminal Justice Training Commission since 1999, responsible for statewide training programs related to child exploitation and child fatality investigations. Ms. Toth started her career in 1980 as a Washington State prosecutor, trying numerous child abuse and sexual assault cases. She then served 8 years as the first director of the National District Attorneys Asso- ciation’s National Center for Prosecution of Child Abuse, and later worked as a trial attorney in the Child Exploitation Section of the U.S. Department of Justice. Ms. Toth is active in the American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children (APSAC), was its national president in 1994, and man- ages APSAC’s Child Forensic Interview Clinics. She is also active in the International Society for Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect and previ- ously served on its executive council. As an expert in the investigation and prosecution of child abuse and exploitation, she frequently presents training throughout the United States and in other countries. Ms. Toth co-authored Washington State’s Child Interview Guide and developed the state’s CPOD (Collaboration, Preservation, Observation, and Documentation) Guidelines for First Responders to Child Fatalities and Serious Physical Abuse. In 2008, she received the J. Pat Finley Child Protection Lifetime Achievement Award. Consultant Elena O. Nightingale, M.D., Ph.D., is a scholar-in-residence at the Institute of Medicine and adjunct professor of pediatrics at both Georgetown Uni- versity Medical Center and George Washington University Medical Center. Previously, she was special advisor to the president and senior program of- ficer at Carnegie Corporation of New York, and lecturer in social medicine at Harvard University. With Eric Stover, she co-edited The Breaking of Bodies and Minds: Torture, Psychiatric Abuse and the Health Professions, published in 1985, one of the earliest efforts to address this topic. She authored, co-authored, or co-edited numerous books and articles on child and adolescent health, genetics, health promotion and disease prevention, health policy, and human rights. Dr. Nightingale is active in the protection of human rights, particularly those of children, and serves on the advisory committee of the Children’s Rights Division of Human Rights Watch. She has been associated with the Institute of Medicine (IOM) for many years. She served as staff and board director and, after election to membership in the IOM, as committee member, chair, and member of the Report Review Committee of the National Research Council. In 2006 she received the Walsh McDermott medal in recognition of her distinguished service to the

OCR for page 439
446 Commercial Sexual Exploitation and Sex Trafficking of Minors IOM and the National Academies. In 2008, in recognition of extraordinary service, Dr. Nightingale was designated a lifetime national associate of the National Research Council. She earned an A.B. degree in zoology, summa cum laude, from Barnard College of Columbia University; a Ph.D. in mi- crobial genetics from the Rockefeller University; and an M.D. from New York University School of Medicine. Project Staff Patti G. Simon, M.P.H., is senior program officer with the Board on Chil- dren, Youth, and Families at the National Academies. Ms. Simon served as study director for the Committee on the Commercial Sexual Exploita- tion and Sex Trafficking of Minors in the United States. She also served as program officer for two recent Institute of Medicine (IOM) and National Research Council studies: Child and Adolescent Health and Health Care Quality: Measuring What Matters and Improving Access to Oral Health Care for Vulnerable and Underserved Populations. Prior to joining the IOM in 2009, Ms. Simon worked in the Department of Health Policy at The George Washington University, where she managed a national program fo- cused on health disparities and the social determinants of health. She holds an M.P.H. with a concentration in health education and health promotion from the University of Texas School of Public Health. Alejandra Martín, M.P.H., is a research associate with the Institute of Medicine (IOM). In her 3-year tenure with the IOM, she has played an integral part in the production and publication of numerous consensus committee reports focused on the broad issues surrounding public health funding, measurement, laws, and policies; women’s health; postmarketing studies of approved drugs; and adolescent health research and policy. Prior to joining the IOM, Ms. Martín worked as a research assistant for 7 years at the Center for the Study of Latino Health and Culture, University of Cali- fornia, Los Angeles, where she managed and assisted on several research and community projects. Her research experience includes Latino health disparities and policy; public health policy and funding; and the intersec- tion of policy and social-epidemiology of HIV/AIDS, breast cancer, and education. Ms. Martín earned an M.P.H. in epidemiology at The George Washington University. Tara Mainero, M.S.W., is a research associate with the Board on Children, Youth, and Families of the National Academies. Prior to joining the Na- tional Academies, Ms. Mainero worked to improve the health of America’s children and families in the public and private sectors. Most recently, she

OCR for page 439
Appendix E 447 worked at the federal level for the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Ser- vices and with the Administration on Children, Youth and Families. Prior to her federal service, she spent several years in the private sector working for the Children’s Defense Fund, where she contributed to national advocacy efforts to expand access to health care for the most vulnerable children and families. Ms. Mainero earned a master of social work degree with a concentration in social change from the Catholic University of America. Pamella Atayi is administrative assistant for the Institute of Medicine/ National Research Council’s Board (IOM/NRC) on Children, Youth, and Families. She serves as liaison to the members of the board for annual meetings, provides administrative services to the director of the board, and manages the board’s daily administrative activities. Ms. Atayi has been working for the IOM since 2009. Along with her service to the board, she has supported the Committee on the Commercial Sexual Exploitation and Sex Trafficking of Minors in the United States. Ms. Atayi has worked with a number of IOM/NRC committees during her tenure, including the Committee on Pediatric Health and Health Care Quality Measures and the Committee on the Science of Research on Families. During her more than 16 years of providing administrative services to various organizations in the Washington, DC, area, she worked with a number of nonprofit organiza- tions, including the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America’s public policy office on Capitol Hill and World Education Services. She has also worked for government entities such as the National Defense University and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Ms. Atayi once ran her own home-based business, providing temporary administrative services to various small busi- nesses in the DC area. She earned her B.A. in English from the University of Maryland University College and holds a diploma in computer information systems from Strayer University. Kimber Bogard, Ph.D., is director of the Board on Children, Youth, and Families of the Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. In this role, she directs a range of activities that address emerging and critical issues in the lives of children, youth, and families. She was previously as- sociate director of the Institute of Human Development and Social Change at New York University, where she managed a portfolio of grants and contracts examining child development within a changing global context. A developmental psychologist by training, Dr. Bogard has worked with numerous organizations that support children’s cognitive, affective, and behavioral development in early childhood education through the high school years, including the Foundation for Child Development, the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, the Center for Children’s Initiatives, and Partners for a Bright and Healthy Haiti. Dr. Bogard often speaks to various audiences

OCR for page 439
448 Commercial Sexual Exploitation and Sex Trafficking of Minors about child development in the context of families and schools, with a focus on how policies influence developmental, educational, and health trajectories. In 2006, she received her Ph.D. from Fordham University in applied developmental psychology, and she also holds a master’s degree from Columbia University-Teachers College, where she studied risk and prevention strategies in adolescents. Arlene F. Lee, J.D., is staff director for the Committee on Law and Justice of the National Research Council (NRC). Before joining the NRC, Ms. Lee directed public policy work at the Center for the Study of Social Policy (CSSP), which helps federal and state elected officials develop policies to improve results for children and families. In this capacity, she managed PolicyforResults.org, a leading national resource for research-based state policy and funding strategies. Prior to joining CSSP, Ms. Lee was executive director of the Maryland Governor’s Office for Children, where she chaired the Children’s Cabinet and was responsible for more than $60 million in federal and state funding sources, distributed annually to local collabora- tives through a results-based plan and accountability process. During her tenure, she led the development of Maryland’s first 3-year children’s plan, establishing the state’s goals and strategies for the delivery of integrated services to children and families. As a result of her work, she has received three Governor’s Citations and was named one of Maryland’s Top 100 Women. She has served as deputy director of the Georgetown University Center for Juvenile Justice Reform and director of the Federal Resource Center for Children of Prisoners. Ms. Lee is also the author of numerous articles and co-authored The Impact of the Adoption and Safe Families Act on Children of Incarcerated Parents. She holds a B.A. in sociology from Washington College and a J.D. from Washington College of Law, American University.