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B SPEAKER BIOSKETCHES Paul Anastas, Ph.D., is the assistant administrator for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Research and Development (ORD) and the science advisor to the agency. Known widely as the “Father of Green Chemistry” for his groundbreaking research on the design, manufacture, and use of minimally toxic, environmentally friendly chemicals, Dr. Anastas has an extensive record of leadership in government, academia, and the private sector. At the time he was nominated by President Obama to lead ORD, Dr. Anastas was the director of the Center for Green Chemistry and Green Engineering, and the inaugural Teresa and H. John Heinz III Professor in the Practice of Chemistry for the Environment at Yale University’s School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. Prior to joining the Yale faculty, Dr. Anastas was the founding director of the Green Chemistry Institute, headquartered at the American Chemical Society in Washington, DC. From 1999 to 2004, he worked at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, concluding his service there as the assistant director for the environment. Dr. Anastas began his career as a staff chemist at the EPA, where he rose to the positions of chief of the Industrial Chemistry Branch, and director of the U.S. Green Chemistry Program. It was during his work at the EPA that Dr. Anastas coined the term “green chemistry.” Trained as a synthetic organic chemist, Dr. Anastas has focused his research interests on the design of safer chemicals, bio-based polymers, and new methodologies of chemical synthesis that are more efficient and less hazardous to the environment. A leading writer on the subjects of sustainability, green chemistry, and green engineering, he has published ten books, including Benign by Design, Designing Safer Polymers, Green Engineering, and his seminal work with co-author John Warner, Green Chemistry: Theory and Practice. Molly Anderson, Ph.D., is the Partridge Chair in Food and Sustainable Agriculture Systems at the College of the Atlantic. She has focused her 127

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128 PUBLIC HEALTH LINKAGES WITH SUSTAINABILITY career on food systems issues and is especially interested in effective multi-stakeholder collaborations for sustainability. Her professional writing and speaking is on food security, food politics, food rights, food sovereignty, and sustainability metrics. She was a coordinating lead author on the North America/Europe section of the International Assessment of Agricultural Knowledge, Science, and Technology for Development. Most recently, Dr. Anderson has been consulting on science and policy for social justice, ecological integrity, and democratic food systems. Prior to that, she held two interim positions at Oxfam America (2002–2005) and a faculty position at Tufts University, where she taught, administered programs, built partnerships, and conducted research for 14 years. She co-founded and for 5 years directed the Agriculture, Food and Environment Graduate Degree Program in the School of Nutrition Science & Policy at Tufts. She also directed the Tufts Institute of the Environment for 2 years. Jamie Bartram, Ph.D., is a Don and Jennifer Holzworth Distinguished Professor in the Gillings School of Global Public Health of the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill and director of the Water Institute at UNC. Dr. Bartram has worked in diverse areas of public health and disease prevention, especially in relation to environment and health and water supply and sanitation. He has worked in more than 60 developing and developed countries worldwide. From 1998 to 2009, he worked at the World Health Organization’s headquarters, leading the Water, Sanitation, Hygiene, and Health Unit and the Unit for Assessing and Managing Environmental Risks to Health. Dr. Bartram was awarded the IWA (International Water Association) Grand Award in 2004 for international leadership in development and application of evidence-based policy and good practice; he is an honorary professor at the University of Wales at Aberystwyth and a visiting professor at the Universities of Bristol and Surrey, UK. He was the first elected chair of UN-Water. He was previously manager, Water and Wastes, at the WHO European Centre for Environment and Health in Rome and head of the Environmental Health Division of the Robens Institute of the University of Surrey in the United Kingdom. Linda S. Birnbaum, Ph.D., D.A.B.T., A.T.S., is the director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) and National Toxicology Program (NTP). She oversees a $730-million

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APPENDIX B 129 budget that funds multidisciplinary biomedical research programs, prevention, and intervention efforts that encompass training, education, technology transfer, and community outreach. NIEHS is located in the Research Triangle Park, near Durham, Raleigh, and Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Dr. Birnbaum received her Ph.D. in microbiology from the University of Illinois, Urbana, and has held several different positions with NIEHS and EPA. She is a diplomat of the American Board of Toxicology and a fellow of the Academy of Toxicological Sciences. Dr. Birnbaum is the author of more than 650 peer-reviewed publications, book chapters, abstracts, and reports. She is an adjunct professor at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and at Duke University. Dr. Birnbaum is the former vice president of the American Aging Association, the former chairperson of the Division of Toxicology of the American Society of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, and the former president of the Society of Toxicology. She has received numerous awards, including the Conservation Award from the National Wildlife Fund, the Ambassador Award from the Mid-Atlantic Chapter of the Society of Toxicology, the EPA’s Health Science Achievement Award and the Diversity Leadership Award, and numerous EPA Science and Technological Achievement Awards. Carlos Corvalán, Ph.D., is a senior advisor on Risk Assessment and Global Environmental Change at the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), based in Washington, DC. He joined the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1993 and PAHO in 2008. He is editor and author of the WHO book Decision-Making in Environmental Health: From Evidence to Action, the WHO report Climate Change and Human Health: Risks and Responses, and the WHO report Ecosystems and Human Well-Being: Health Synthesis, which was WHO’s contribution to the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. He also coauthored WHO’s report on preventing diseases through healthy environments. For many years he has been giving workshops to representatives from ministries of health and other government officials and experts to promote awareness and action related to protecting health from climate and other environmental changes. Corvalán has a master of public health degree from Sydney University, Australia, and a Ph.D. in environmental health from Nijmegen University, the Netherlands. Richard A. Fenske, Ph.D., M.P.H., is professor and associate chair of environmental and occupational health sciences at the University of

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130 PUBLIC HEALTH LINKAGES WITH SUSTAINABILITY Washington (UW), and has served as director of the NIOSH-supported Pacific Northwest Agricultural Safety and Health Center since 1996. He is a core faculty member of the NIEHS-supported Center for Ecogenetics and Environmental Health. He also served as deputy director of the EPA/NIEHS-supported UW Center for Child Environmental Health Risks Research from 1996 to 2003, and director of the UW Field Research and Consultation Group from 1992 to 1996. Dr. Fenske has focused his research on the assessment and mitigation of chemical hazards through workplace and community studies. He has introduced novel procedures for the assessment of skin exposure among agricultural workers through the use of fluorescent tracers. He has also contributed to the elucidation of pesticide exposure pathways for children living in agricultural communities and in residential settings. His current research includes studies of pesticide handler exposures, advanced biomonitering techniques, pesticide spray drift, and paraoccupational exposures of children in rural communities. He currently receives research support from the NIOSH Agricultural Centers Program, the EPA/NIEHS Children’s Environmental Health Centers Program, and the EPA STAR grant program. From 1984 to 1990 Dr. Fenske was assistant professor and then associate professor of environmental sciences at Rutgers University and the New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station. He received his doctoral degree and M.P.H. from the University of California, Berkeley in environmental health sciences. He was also awarded a master’s degree in geography from the University of California, Berkeley and a master’s degree in comparative religion from Columbia University in New York. His bachelor’s degree is in history from Stanford University. Lynn R. Goldman, M.D., M.P.H., a pediatrician and an epidemiologist, is dean of and professor at the School of Public Health and Health Services at George Washington University (GWU). Prior to her move to GWU, Dr. Goldman was a professor of environmental health sciences at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. Her areas of focus are children’s environmental health research, public health preparedness, and environmental health policy. She had joint appointments in the Departments of Health Policy and Management and Epidemiology and in Emergency Medicine at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. From 1993 to 1998, Dr. Goldman served as assistant administrator for the EPA’s Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances. In

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APPENDIX B 131 that position she was responsible for the nation’s pesticide, toxic substances, and pollution prevention laws. In this job she was responsible for managing a number of complex regulatory and science issues. Her achievements included expanding the Toxics Release Inventory, reauthorizing the nation’s pesticides laws (Food Quality Protection Act of 1996); and development of a framework for the regulation of biotechnology chemical and pesticide products. She led consensual processes that developed frameworks for testing of high-volume industrial chemicals and for identification of chemicals that disrupt endocrine systems. Dr. Goldman has a B.S. from the University of California, Berkeley; an M.P.H. from the Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health; an M.D. from the University of California, San Francisco; and pediatric training at Children’s Hospital, Oakland, California. She has served on numerous boards and expert committees, including the Committee on Environmental Health of the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Centers for Disease Control Lead Poisoning Prevention Advisory Committee. Dr. Goldman is a member of the Institute of Medicine and vice chair of the Institute of Medicine Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research, and Medicine. Bernard D. Goldstein, M.D., is professor emeritus in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health at the University of Pittsburgh’s Graduate School of Public Health and a former dean of the graduate school. He served as the director of the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, a joint program of Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, and the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ)–Robert Wood Johnson Medical School from 1986 to 2001. He was the chair of the Department of Environmental and Community Medicine, UMDNJ–Robert Wood Johnson Medical School from 1980 to 2001. He was the first principal investigator of the Consortium of Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation. Dr. Goldstein served as acting dean of the UMDNJ–School of Public Health from 1998 to 1999, the first year of its formation. Dr. Goldstein earned his B.S. degree at the University of Wisconsin in 1958 and his M.D. at New York University School of Medicine in 1962. He is a physician, board certified in internal medicine and hematology as well as toxicology. Dr. Goldstein was assistant administrator for research and development at the EPA from 1983 to 1985. His past activities include

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132 PUBLIC HEALTH LINKAGES WITH SUSTAINABILITY serving as member and chairman of the NIH Toxicology Study Section and the EPA’s Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee; chair of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Committee on the Role of the Physician in Occupational and Environmental Medicine; chair of the National Research Council Committees on Biomarkers in Environmental Health Research and Risk Assessment Methodology; and chair of the Industry Panel of the World Health Organization Commission on Health and Environment. He is a member of the IOM where he has co-chaired the member section on Public Health, Biostatistics, and Epidemiology and he has been a member of the IOM Committee on Environmental Justice: Research, Education, and Health Policy Needs. Dr. Goldstein is also president-elect for the Society for Risk Analysis, vice president of the Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment, and a member of the National Advisory Environmental Health Sciences Council. He is the author of more than 200 articles and book chapters related to environmental health sciences and to public policy. Richard J. Jackson, M.D., M.P.H., is professor and chair of the Department of Environmental Health Sciences in the School of Public Health at the University of California, Los Angeles. A pediatrician and public health leader, he recently served as a professor at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and at the University of California, Berkeley. He served in many leadership positions with the California Health Department, including the highest, state health officer. For 9 years he was Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) National Center for Environmental Health in Atlanta. In 2005 he was recognized with the highest civilian award for U.S. government service, the Presidential Distinguished Executive Award. While in California his work led to the establishment of the California Birth Defects Monitoring Program and state and national laws that reduced risks, especially to farm workers and to children, from dangerous pesticides. While at CDC he established the national asthma epidemiology and control program, and advanced the childhood lead poisoning prevention program. He instituted the current federal effort to “biomonitor” chemical levels in the U.S. population. He was the U.S. lead under several U.S. government efforts around health and environment in Russia, including radiation threats. In the late 1990s he was the CDC leader in establishing the U.S. National Pharmaceutical Stockpile to prepare for terrorism and other disasters—which was activated on September 11, 2001. In 2006 he received the Breast Cancer

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APPENDIX B 133 Fund’s Hero Award, and at the University of California, Berkeley, 2007 commencement, the School of Public Health graduate students recognized him as the Distinguished Teacher and Mentor of the Year. Dr. Jackson coauthored Urban Sprawl and Public Health, a 2004 book from Island Press. He has served on many environmental and health boards, as well as the board of directors of the American Institute of Architects. Wilfried Kreisel, Ph.D., holds a doctorate degree in physical chemistry from the University of Heidelberg, Germany. Before joining WHO in 1977, he was a research fellow at the University of Dortmund, Germany (1974–1977) where he conducted interdisciplinary research on the effects of environmental determinants on health. As WHO adviser for environmental health, Dr. Kreisel spent 8 years in the Republic of Korea and Malaysia (1977–1985) and 1 year as regional adviser in the Western Pacific Regional Office in Manila, Philippines (1985–1986). In 1986 he was reassigned to WHO Headquarters in Geneva as director, Division of Environmental Health (1986–1993). Subsequently, he was appointed executive director, Health and Environment (1993–1998). In this capacity, Dr. Kreisel was responsible for planning, developing and implementing global policies and programs in public health with a focus on environmental health. Among important functions, Dr. Kreisel was WHO’s officer-in- charge of the preparatory process and follow-up to the Rio Summit in 1992, and was the chairman of various interagency programs and committees, and international conferences on public health and environment issues. From 1998 to 2002, he served as executive director at the WHO Office at the European Union (EU) in Brussels, Belgium, to build up and reinforce WHO’s relations with EU institutions and other organizations such as the OECD (Paris) and the Council of Europe (Strasbourg). In 2004–2005 he was Director of the WHO Centre for Health Development in Kobe, Japan, where he, among others, developed a research framework for the center’s future work focusing on selected social and environmental determinants of health in urban areas. He is currently a freelance consultant and specializes in policies and program- matic issues related to health and environment, with emphasis on energy and health and climate change and health. David M. Michaels, Ph.D., M.P.H., is an epidemiologist and a nationally recognized leader in the scientific community’s efforts to protect the integrity of the science on which public health and regulatory

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134 PUBLIC HEALTH LINKAGES WITH SUSTAINABILITY policies are based. Before joining the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) within the U.S. Department of Labor, he was professor of environmental and occupational health at the George Washington University School of Public Health. From 1998 to 2001, Dr. Michaels served as assistant secretary of energy for environment, safety, and health. In that position, he was the chief architect of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program, the historic initiative to compensate nuclear weapons workers who contracted occupational illnesses as a result of exposure to radiation, beryllium, and other hazards. The program has provided more than $6 billion in payments to sick workers and the families of deceased workers. In 2006 Dr. Michaels was awarded the American Association for the Advancement of Science’s Scientific Freedom and Responsibility Award, and, in 2009, the John P. McGovern Science and Society Award given by Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research Society, for his work in scientific integrity and for gaining compensation for nuclear weapons workers. Dr. Michaels is the author of studies examining the health of construction workers, printers, bus drivers and other occupations, as well as of numerous publications on science and regulatory policy, including Doubt Is Their Product: How Industry’s Assault on Science Threatens Your Health (Oxford University Press, 2008). He is a graduate of the City College of New York, and holds M.P.H. and Ph.D. degrees from Columbia University. Daniel P. Schrag, Ph.D., is the director of the Harvard University Center for the Environment, the Sturgis Hooper Professor of Geology, and professor of environmental science and engineering at Harvard University. Dr. Schrag studies climate and climate change over the broadest range of Earth’s history. He has examined changes in ocean circulation over the last several decades, with particular attention to El Niño and the tropical Pacific; he investigates Pleistocene ice-age cycles over the past million years; he studies the warm climates of the Eocene, 50 million years ago; and, with colleagues from Harvard, he helped to develop the Snowball Earth hypothesis that explains extreme glacial events that occurred more than 600 million years ago. Currently he is working on the early history of Mars and Earth, trying to understand the environmental conditions around the time of the origin of life. He is also working on new technological approaches to mitigating future climate change, including advanced energy technologies for low-carbon

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APPENDIX B 135 transportation fuel and carbon sequestration. Dr. Schrag received a B.S. from Yale and a Ph.D. in geology from the University of California, Berkeley. He taught at Princeton before moving to Harvard in 1997. Among various honors, he was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2000. He currently serves on President Obama’s Council of Advisors for Science and Technology. Kirk R. Smith, Ph.D., is professor of global environmental health and is also founder and coordinator of the campus-wide Masters Program in Global Health and Environment. In addition to his work at the University of California, Berkeley, Dr. Smith is the chair of the National Research Council Committee on Environmental Exposure Science for the 21st Century and lead author in the health chapter of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s (IPCC’s) Fifth Assessment. Previously, he was founder and head of the Energy Program of the East-West Center in Honolulu, where he still holds appointment as adjunct senior fellow in environment and health after moving to Berkeley in 1995. He serves on a number of national and international scientific advisory committees, including the Global Energy Assessment, the National Research Council’s Board on Atmospheric Science and Climate, the Executive Committee for WHO Air Quality Guidelines, and the International Comparative Risk Assessment. He participated along with many other scientists in the IPCC’s third and fourth assessments and thus shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. He holds visiting professorships in India and China and bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees from the University of California, Berkeley. In 1997 he was elected a member into the National Academy of Sciences, one of the highest honors awarded to scientists by their peers. In 2009 he received the Heinz Prize in Environment. Dr. Smith’s research focuses on environmental and health issues in developing countries, particularly those related to health-damaging and climate-changing air pollution from household energy use, and includes field measurement and health-effects studies in India, China, Nepal, Mexico, and Guatemala as well as development and application of tools for international policy assessments. He also develops and deploys small, smart, and cheap microchip-based monitors for use in these settings. David J. van Hoogstraten, Esq., is the director of policy and regulatory affairs for BP Wind Energy, North America, Inc. Mr. van Hoogstraten has also served as counsel in Hunton & Williams’ International Environmental Practice, and has served for the past 15 years as a senior

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136 PUBLIC HEALTH LINKAGES WITH SUSTAINABILITY U.S. government lawyer and policy maker at the State Department, White House Council on Environmental Quality, and the EPA, where he has worked on a wide range of international environmental issues that significantly affect U.S. businesses. These include the relationship between global environmental health and safety agreements and other arrangements, and international trade laws. His international environmental law practice focuses on the impact on businesses of global and regional environmental, health, and safety legal and regulatory regimes dealing with industrial chemicals and pesticides, climate change, ozone depletion, the transboundary movement of hazardous chemicals, electronic and other wastes, nanotechnology, biotechnology and biosafety, and other biodiversity challenges. It further concentrates on how regulatory restrictions in overseas markets impact clients’ ability to compete effectively in a global economy. Mr. van Hoogstraten is proficient in the provisions and implementation of the major global environmental agreements and with conflicts between international trade law and environmental, health, and safety laws. Paul Wilkinson, F.R.C.P., M.P.H., studied medicine at Oxford University and then spent several years in hospital medicine in London before taking up an epidemiological research post at the UK National Heart & Lung Institute. From there he moved to the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) in 1994, where he first began research into the links between the environment and health, initially studying hazards arising from localized chemical contamination of the environment—pollution of the air and from industrial emissions. Such hazards have been the focus of much international research effort in recent years reflecting the problems associated with industrialization and urban living in both the developed and the developing world. More recently, Dr. Wilkinson has been part of a research team that has begun to focus on the health impacts of global environmental change. There is now increasing recognition of the growing threats to human health from large-scale environmental changes—threats arising from our profligate consumption of the Earth’s resources and from pollution of the environment on a global scale. One of those threats is climate change and its potential impacts on health. Dr. Wilkinson’s research in this field was developed initially through a cooperative research group on climate change, ozone depletion, and health sponsored by the Medical Research Council and the Natural Environment Research Council, a collaboration

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APPENDIX B 137 between the London School and the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research at the University of East Anglia. He is codirector at LSHTM of the WHO Collaborating Centre on Global Change and Health. In 2009 he was a key member of the Task Force on Climate Change Mitigation and Public Health. He currently leads a major European Commission–funded project on the public health impacts in urban environments of greenhouse gas emissions reduction strategies in Europe and Asia. Lauren Zeise, Ph.D., is chief of the Reproductive and Cancer Hazard Assessment Section in the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment at the California Environmental Protection Agency. She oversees a variety of risk assessment and public health activities, including development of approaches for assessing cumulative impacts, green chemistry and safer alternatives, susceptible populations, cancer and reproductive toxicants, and health risks for environmental media, food, and consumer products. Her group also conducts the department’s biomonitoring activities and the science for California’s Proposition 65 statute. Dr. Zeise has served on numerous advisory boards and committees addressing issues of risk, chemicals policy, and public policy. This includes boards and committees of the EPA, WHO, NIEHS, and the National Academy of Sciences’ Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. Recent National Academy of Sciences reports she coauthored include Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century: A Vision and a Strategy (2009) and Science and Decisions: Advancing Risk Assessment (2007). She is a member, fellow, and past councilor of the Society of Risk Analysis and received the society’s Outstanding Risk Practitioner Award in 2008. Dr. Zeise received her Ph.D. from Harvard University.