B

Speaker Biosketches

John Adgate, Ph.D., M.S.P.H., is chair of the Department of Environmental & Occupational Health at the Colorado School of Public Health. His research focuses on improving exposure assessment in epidemiologic studies—studying the factors that affect the health and illness of entire populations—by documenting the magnitude and variability of human exposure to air pollutants, pesticides, metals, and allergens. Some of his research projects have included evaluating methods that might help to reduce lead poisoning in the home, outcomes of long-term exposure to indoor and outdoor air pollutants, and a controlled trial to test an allergen reduction intervention in inner-city residences. Dr. Adgate has a Ph.D. in environmental health from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey–Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and Rutgers University, an M.S. in public health from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and a B.S. in biology from Calvin College.

James K. Bartram, Ph.D., is a professor of environmental sciences and engineering in the Gillings School of Global Public Health of the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill and founding director of the Water Institute at UNC. He has worked in diverse areas of public health and disease prevention, especially in relation to environment and health and water supply and sanitation. From 1998 to 2009, he worked at the World Health Organization’s Headquarters, leading the Water, Sanitation, Hygiene, and Health Unit and the Unit for Assessing and Managing Environmental Risks to Health. Dr. Bartram was awarded the International Water Association Grand Award in 2004 for international leadership in development and application of evidence-based policy and good practice. He is an honorary professor at the University of Wales at Aberystwyth and a visiting professor at the Universities of Bristol and Surrey, United Kingdom. Dr. Bartram is author of more than 60 academic papers and more than 40 book chapters, and editor of about 25 books, including aspects of global monitoring, water supply, sanitation, and pollution. He received a Ph.D. in environmental and public health and a B.Sc. in microbiology from the University of Surrey.



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B Speaker Biosketches John Adgate, Ph.D., M.S.P.H., is chair of the Department of Environmental & Occupational Health at the Colorado School of Public Health. His research focuses on improving exposure assessment in epidemiologic studies—studying the factors that affect the health and ill- ness of entire populations—by documenting the magnitude and variabil- ity of human exposure to air pollutants, pesticides, metals, and allergens. Some of his research projects have included evaluating methods that might help to reduce lead poisoning in the home, outcomes of long-term exposure to indoor and outdoor air pollutants, and a controlled trial to test an allergen reduction intervention in inner-city residences. Dr. Adgate has a Ph.D. in environmental health from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey–Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and Rutgers University, an M.S. in public health from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and a B.S. in biology from Calvin College. James K. Bartram, Ph.D., is a professor of environmental sciences and engineering in the Gillings School of Global Public Health of the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill and founding director of the Water Institute at UNC. He has worked in diverse areas of public health and disease prevention, especially in relation to environment and health and water supply and sanitation. From 1998 to 2009, he worked at the World Health Organization’s Headquarters, leading the Water, Sanitation, Hygiene, and Health Unit and the Unit for Assessing and Managing Environmental Risks to Health. Dr. Bartram was awarded the International Water Association Grand Award in 2004 for international leadership in development and application of evidence-based policy and good practice. He is an honorary professor at the University of Wales at Aberystwyth and a visiting professor at the Universities of Bristol and Surrey, United Kingdom. Dr. Bartram is author of more than 60 academic papers and more than 40 book chapters, and editor of about 25 books, including aspects of global monitoring, water supply, sanitation, and pollution. He received a Ph.D. in environmental and public health and a B.Sc. in microbiology from the University of Surrey. 127

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128 HEALTH IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF SHALE GAS EXTRACTION Linda S. Birnbaum, Ph.D., DAPT, ATS, is director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and National Toxicology Program (NTP). As NIEHS and NTP director, Dr. Birnbaum oversees a budget that funds multidisciplinary biomedical research programs, prevention, and inter- vention efforts that encompass training, education, technology transfer, and community outreach. The NIEHS supports more than 1,000 research grants. A board-certified toxicologist, Dr. Birnbaum has served as a federal scientist for nearly 32 years. Prior to her appointment as the NIEHS and NTP director in 2009, she spent 19 years at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) where she directed the largest division focusing on environmental health research. Dr. Birnbaum started her federal career with 10 years at the NIEHS, first as a senior staff fellow at the National Toxicology Program, then as a principal investigator and research microbiologist, and finally as a group leader for the Institute’s Chemical Disposition Group. Dr. Birnbaum has received numerous awards and recognitions. She was elected to the Collegium Ramazzini, received an honorary doctor of science from the University of Rochester, and a Distinguished Alumna Award from the University of Illinois. In October 2010, she was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. Her awards include the Women in Toxicology Elsevier Mentoring Award, the Society of Toxicology Public Commun- ications Award, EPA’s Health Science Achievement Award and Diversity Leadership Award, and 12 Science and Technology Achieve- ment Awards. She is the author of more than 700 peer-reviewed publications, book chapters, abstracts, and reports. Dr. Birnbaum received her M.S. and Ph.D. in microbiology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. David J. Carey, Ph.D., is associate chief research officer, director, and senior scientist of the Sigfried and Janet Weis Center for Research at the Geisinger Health System. Dr. Carey has extensive research experience in the areas of cellular and molecular biology, and is now extensively engaged in genomics research on vascular disease and other areas. He has served as a key player in the development of translational genomics research at Geisinger since 2004. Dr. Carey received his Ph.D. from St. Louis University. David Cole, M.S., is regional discipline leader for production technology for Shell’s Upstream Americas Business Unit. In this role, he oversees the activities of Shell’s 200 production engineers in the Americas. Mr. Cole joined Shell in 1981 as a production engineer. He spent the next 10 years being responsible for conventional and unconventional fields in Shell’s Onshore and Offshore businesses. Mr. Cole then moved to Shell’s Bellaire Research Center where he was a member of a team positioning Shell for its entrance into the Deepwater. In 1993, Mr. Cole transferred back to a production engineering technical specialist before

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APPENDIX B 129 becoming a superintendent with engineering and operations responsibilities for drilling, completions, and well inter-ventions. Following the creation of the Americas Region in 2003, Mr. Cole became completion and wells services engineering manager for the region. Moving back into the technology arena, he then headed up the region’s Technology Planning and Implementation team, with respons- ibility for developing new capabilities for the region. Prior to his current assignment, Mr. Cole was operations manager with responsibility for three of Shell’s platforms in the Gulf of Mexico. He has a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from Mississippi State University and a master’s degree in petroleum engineering from Louisiana State University. Rob Donnelly, M.B.Ch.B., MFOM, grew up in Perth Scotland and studied Medicine at Edinburgh University. He joined the Royal Army Medical Corps and spent 6 years in a variety of roles, with the infantry in Northern Ireland and London, Army hospitals in Hong Kong and London, and finally a mobile armored field unit in the West of England. He completed training in family medicine before leaving the Army to train in occupational medicine at British Steel in South Wales. After 6 years in a variety of roles in the steel industry, he moved to Shell in Aberdeen, working in the offshore Exploration and Production sector. A move to Houston, Texas, followed, where for 4 years he led Shell Health Services in the Americas. This involved multiple business units in 34 countries. In March 2007 he moved to The Hague, Netherlands, to assume his current position as vice president health for Royal Dutch Shell. He is accountable for 650 staff in 130 countries where Shell has operational interests. A particular area of focus is operations and the potential impact on health of a community. His professional interests include fitness to work and environmental health. He has published a number of articles on occupational medicine and health and the workplace. Eric J. Esswein, M.S.P.H., is a senior industrial hygienist with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Western States Office in Denver, Colorado. He conducts field-based research in oil and gas exploration and production. Esswein has been a commissioned officer in the U.S. Public Health Service since 1991 when he joined NIOSH as an industrial hygienist with the Hazard Evaluations and Technical Assistance Branch in Cincinnati, Ohio, before transferring to the NIOSH Denver Field Office in 1998. He earned a bachelor’s degree in environmental health and toxicology from Huxley College of the Environment at Western Washington University and a master’s degree in public health with an emphasis in industrial hygiene from the University of Utah. Richard A. Fenske, Ph.D., M.P.H., is professor and associate chair of environmental and occupational health sciences at the University of

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130 HEALTH IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF SHALE GAS EXTRACTION Washington (UW), and has served as director of the NIOSH-supported Pacific Northwest Agricultural Safety and Health Center since 1996. He is a core faculty member of the NIEHS-supported Center for Ecogenetics and Environmental Health. He also served as deputy director of the EPA/NIEHS-supported UW Center for Child Environmental Health Risks Research from 1996 to 2003, and director of the UW Field Research and Consultation Group from 1992 to 1996. Dr. Fenske currently serves on several federal advisory boards and committees: The EPA’s primary advisory group, the Science Advisory Board; the National Academy of Sciences/Institute of Medicine (IOM) Committee to Review the Health Effects in Vietnam Veterans of Exposure to Herbicides; and the 16-member EPA Human Studies Review Board, which evaluates the science and ethics of studies involving human subjects. He is also on the editorial boards of the Journal of Agricultural Safety and Health and the Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology. Dr. Fenske teaches courses in the areas of environmental health risk assessment, environmental sampling and analysis, exposure science, and public health policy related to pesticide use. From 1984 to 1990, Dr. Fenske was assistant professor and then associate professor of environmental sciences at Rutgers University and the New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station. He received his doctoral degree and master’s in public health from the University of California (UC), Berkeley, in environmental health sciences. He was also awarded a master’s degree in geography from UC Berkeley and a master’s degree in comparative religion from Columbia University in New York. His bachelor’s degree is in history from Stanford University. Michael Focazio, Ph.D., received his doctorate from the University of Cincinnati in 1988, specializing in watershed modeling. After a short time as environmental scientist for the Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin, Dr. Focazio joined the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) as a hydrologist in the Virginia Water Science Center. He served as the program coordinator for the USGS/National Park Service Water Quality Partnership for several years and is presently the associate coordinator for the Toxic Substances Hydrology Program in the Energy, Minerals, and Environmental Health Mission Areas. Dr. Focazio is an instructor in the Johns Hopkins University Advanced Academic Programs, Kreiger School of Arts and Sciences and is the past USGS liaison to the EPA’s Office of Groundwater and Drinking Water. He is presently an appointed board member for the Water and Sanitation Authority of Fauquier County, Virginia. Lynn R. Goldman, M.D., M.P.H., a pediatrician and an epidemiologist, is dean of and professor at the School of Public Health and Health Services at George Washington University (GWU). Prior to her move to GWU, Dr. Goldman was a professor of environmental health sciences at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. Her

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APPENDIX B 131 areas of focus are children’s environmental health research, public health preparedness, and environmental health policy. She had joint appoint- ments in the Departments of Health Policy and Management and Epidemiology and in Emergency Medicine at the John Hopkins School of Medicine. From 1993 to 1998, Dr. Goldman served as Assistant Administrator for the EPA’s Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances. In that position she was responsible for the nation’s pesticide, toxic substances, and pollution prevention laws, with responsible for managing a number of complex regulatory and science issues. Her achievements included expanding the Toxics Release Inventory, reauthorizing the nation’s pesticides laws (Food Quality Protection Act of 1996); and development of a framework for the regulation of biotechnology chemical and pesticide products. She led consensual processes that developed frameworks for testing of high-volume industrial chemicals and for identification of chemicals that disrupt endocrine systems. Between 1985 and 1993, Dr. Goldman served at the California Department of Health Services, most recently as head of the Division of Environmental and Occupational Disease Control. She led public health efforts to respond to emergencies such as earthquakes and unintentional releases of pesticides in communities. She conducted public health investigations on pesticides, childhood lead poisoning, and other environmental hazards. She has a B.S. from UC Berkeley, an M.P.H. from the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, an M.D. from UC San Francisco, and pediatric training at Children’s Hospital, Oakland, California. She has served on numerous boards and expert committees, including the Committee on Environmental Health of the American Academy of Pediatrics and the CDC Lead Poisoning Prevention Advisory Committee. Dr. Goldman is a member of the IOM and vice chair of the IOM Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research, and Medicine. Bernard D. Goldstein, M.D., is emeritus professor of environmental and occupational health and former dean of the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. He is a physician, board certified in internal medicine, hematology, and toxicology. Dr. Goldstein is author of more than 150 publications in the peer-reviewed literature, as well as numerous reviews related to environmental health. He is an elected member of the IOM and of the American Society for Clinical Investi- gation. His experience includes service as assistant administrator for research and development of the EPA, 1983–1985. In 2001, he came to the University of Pittsburgh from New Jersey, where he had been the founding director of the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, a joint program of Rutgers University and Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. He has chaired more than a dozen National Research Council (NRC) and IOM committees primarily related to environmental health issues. He has been president of the Society for

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132 HEALTH IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF SHALE GAS EXTRACTION Risk Analysis; and has chaired the NIH Toxicology Study Section, EPA’s Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee, the National Board of Public Health Examiners, and the Research Committee of the Health Effects Institute. He has also served as a member or chairperson of numerous national and international scientific advisory committees for government, industry, and environmental groups. George M. Gray, Ph.D., is professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health and director of the Center for Risk Science and Public Health at the GWU School of Public Health and Health Services (SPHHS). In both academic and policy-making settings, Dr. Gray has long been committed to the effective use of science to inform public health choices, and emphasizes the importance of communicating those choices effectively to citizens, journalists, and lawmakers. Prior to joining SPHHS in 2010, Dr. Gray served as assistant administrator for the EPA’s Office of Research and Development and as the agency science advisor, promoting scientific excellence in EPA research, advocating for the continuing evolution of the agency’s approach to analysis, and encouraging programs that provide academic research to support EPA’s mission. His areas of focus included nanotechnology, ecosystem research, the influence of toxicology advances on testing and risk assessment, and sustainability. From 2005 to 2009, Dr. Gray was executive director of the Harvard Center for Risk Analysis, and a member of the faculty at the Harvard School of Public Health. In addition to teaching, he applied the tools of risk analysis to public health problems ranging from mad cow disease to pesticides in food to the risks and benefits of fish consumption. Dr. Gray received his doctor of philosophy and master of science in toxicology from the University of Rochester School of Medicine and his bachelor of science in biology from the University of Michigan. Dan Greenbaum, M.C.P., joined the Health Effects Institute (HEI) as its president and chief executive officer in 1994. In that role, he leads HEI’s efforts, supported jointly by EPA and industry, with additional funding from the Department of Energy, the Federal Highway Administration, the U.S. Agency for International Development, the Asian Development Bank, and foundations, to provide public and private decision makers in the United States, Asia, Europe, and Latin America with high-quality, impartial, relevant, and credible science about the health effects of air pollution to inform air quality decisions in the developed and developing world. Mr. Greenbaum has been a member of the NRC Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology and vice chair of its Committee for Air Quality Management in the United States. He recently served on the NRC Committee on the Hidden Costs of Energy and serves currently on the NRC Committee on Science for EPA’s Future. Mr. Greenbaum also chaired the EPA Blue Ribbon Panel on Oxygenates in Gasoline, which issued the report Achieving Clean Air and Clean Water and EPA’s

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APPENDIX B 133 Clean Diesel Independent Review Panel, which reviewed technology progress in implementing the 2007 Highway Diesel Rule. In May 2010, Mr. Greenbaum received the Thomas W. Zosel Outstanding Individual Achievement Award from the EPA for his contributions to advancing clean air. Mr. Greenbaum holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in city planning. Charles G. Groat, Ph.D., holds the John A. and Katherine G. Jackson Chair in Energy and Mineral Resources in the University of Texas (UT) Department of Geological Sciences and is director of the Center for International Energy and Environmental Policy and the Energy and Mineral Resources Graduate Program. He joined the Department of Geological Sciences in June 2005 after serving for 6-and-a-half years as director of the USGS, appointed by President Clinton and retained by President Bush. He also has faculty appointments in the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs and the Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering. At the USGS, he emphasized integrated scientific approaches to understanding complex natural systems and the use of this understanding in management decisions regarding these systems, an interest that continues at the university. His degrees in geology are from the University of Rochester (A.B.), University of Massachusetts (M.S.), and UT at Austin (Ph.D.). Michael Honeycutt, Ph.D., is the director of the Toxicology Division of the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ). He has been employed by the TCEQ since 1996 and has managed the division of 14 toxicologists since 2003. His responsibilities include overseeing health effects reviews of air permit applications, overseeing the review of the results of ambient air monitoring projects, and overseeing the reviews of human health risk assessments for hazardous waste sites. Dr. Honeycutt spearheaded the updating of TCEQ’s Effects Screening Levels (ESLs), or toxicity factors for chemicals. The current TCEQ ESL derivation procedure has been through two independent external scientific peer reviews and multiple rounds of public comment. Dr. Honeycutt serves as a technical resource for TCEQ management and staff on issues concerning air and water quality, drinking water contamination, and soil contamination. He also serves as an expert witness in public and state legislative hearings, participates in public meetings, and has conducted hundreds of media interviews. Dr. Honeycutt is an adjunct professor at Texas A&M University, has published numerous articles in the peer- reviewed literature, serves or has served on numerous external com- mittees, and has provided invited testimony at congressional hearings. Richard J. Jackson, M.D., M.P.H., is a professor and chair of environmental health sciences at UC Los Angeles. He has worked extensively on the impact of the environment on public health, and over the past decade much of his work has focused on how the built

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134 HEALTH IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF SHALE GAS EXTRACTION environment affects health. In 2004, he was co-author of Urban Sprawl and Public Health. Dr. Jackson is currently working on policy analyses of environmental impacts on health, from chemical body burdens to climate change to urban design. In addition, he is evaluating the effects of farming, education, housing, and transportation policies on health. Dr. Jackson chaired the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Environmental Health and recently served on the Board of Directors of the American Institute of Architects. He serves on the editorial boards of the American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Environmental Research, and Public Health Reports. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research, and Medicine and of the NRC Committee on “Sustainable” Products and Services. Dr. Jackson earned his M.D. from UC San Francisco. Robert Jackson, Ph.D., M.S., is the Nicholas Chair of Global Environmental Change and a professor in the Biology Department and Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences at Duke University. His research examines feedbacks between people and the biosphere, including studies of the global carbon and water cycles, biosphere–atmosphere interactions, and global change. He is currently director of Duke’s Center on Global Change and Duke’s Stable Isotope Mass Spectrometry Laboratory. In his quest for solutions to global warming, he also directs the new Department of Energy–funded National Institute for Climatic Change Research for the southeastern United States and codirects the Climate Change Policy Partnership, working with energy and utility corporations to find practical strategies to combat climate change. Dr. Jackson has received numerous awards, including the Murray F. Buell Award from the Ecological Society of America, a 1999 Presidential Early Career Award in Science and Engineering from the National Science Foundation, a fellow in the American Geophysical Union, and inclusion in the top 0.5 percent of most cited scientific researchers. Dr. Jackson’s research has been covered in various newspapers and magazines, such as the Boston Globe, New York Times, Washington Post, USA Today, Scientific American, and BusinessWeek, and on national public radio, including the syndicated programs “Morning Edition,” “All Things Considered,” “Marketplace,” “The Tavis Smiley Show,” “The Next 200 Years,” and “Earth and Sky” (for which he is a science advisor and scriptwriter). Dr. Jackson received his B.S. in chemical engineering from Rice University (1983). He worked 4 years for the Dow Chemical Company before obtaining M.S. degrees in ecology (1990) and statistics (1992) and a Ph.D. in ecology (1992) at Utah State University. He was a Department of Energy Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellow for Global Change at Stanford University and an assistant professor at the University of Texas before joining the Duke faculty in 1999. Timothy Kelsey, Ph.D., is a professor of agricultural economics at The Pennsylvania State University. He conducts research on issues such as

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APPENDIX B 135 economic and community implications of Marcellus Shale, public finance and taxation, and land-use change. Through Penn State Cooperative Extension, Dr. Kelsey teaches workshops statewide to local government officials, citizens, and others interested in community issues. He has been at Penn State since 1991, and began actively working on Marcellus issues in 2008. Suzette M. Kimball, Ph.D., is associate director for geology of the USGS. Dr. Kimball is the first woman to hold the position. Previously, she was director of the USGS’s Eastern Region. Dr. Kimball provides executive leadership of USGS geologic investigations on the past, present, and future conditions of the Earth’s environment, hazards, and resources. Specifically, she is responsible for basic earth science programs, including monitoring of worldwide earthquake hazards, geologic mapping of land and seafloor resources, the study of volcanic and landslide hazards, and research and assessments of mineral and energy resources. As director of the Eastern Region of the USGS, Dr. Kimball led multidisciplinary science programs in geology, hydrology, biology, and geography, covering the 26 U.S. states east of the Mississippi River, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The USGS Eastern Region includes more than 2,600 employees in about 120 locations. She joined USGS in 1998 as Eastern Regional Executive for Biology. In that position, she built many partnerships, helped shape programs, and led the establish- ment of the USGS Florida Integrated Science Center. Dr. Kimball received her B.A. in english from the College of William & Mary, an M.S. in geology/ geophysics from Ball State University, and a Ph.D. in environmental sciences/coastal and oceanographic processes from the University of Virginia. Linda A. McCauley, Ph.D., R.N., FAAN, FAAOHN, is the sixth dean of Emory University’s Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing. She began her appointment in May 2009 after serving as the associate dean for research at the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Nursing. Dr. McCauley holds a secondary appointment in the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University and is internationally recognized for her scholarship in environmental and occupational health. She has devoted much of her distinguished career to identifying culturally appropriate interventions to decrease the impact of environmental and occupational health hazards for workers and young children. Dr. McCauley is currently leading two studies in Florida and Oregon with funding from NIH and CDC. Dr. McCauley is an elected member of the IOM of the National Academies. She also is a fellow of the American Academy of Nursing and the American Academy of Occupational Health Nurses. She has been widely published in the fields of nursing and environmental health. She is a sought-after speaker and has been featured in national publications and broadcasts including Time, Business Week, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, National Public Radio, and the Weather Channel.

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136 HEALTH IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF SHALE GAS EXTRACTION David M. Michaels, Ph.D., M.P.H., is an epidemiologist and a nationally recognized leader in the scientific community’s efforts to protect the integrity of the science on which public health and regulatory policies are based. Before joining the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), he was professor of environmental and occupational health at the GWU School of Public Health. From 1998 to 2001, Dr. Michaels served as assistant secretary of Energy for Environment, Safety and Health. In that position, he was the chief architect of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program, the historic initiative to compensate nuclear weapons workers who contracted occupational illnesses as a result of exposure to radiation, beryllium, and other hazards. The program has provided more than $6 billion in payments to sick workers and the families of deceased workers. In 2006, Dr. Michaels was awarded the American Association for the Advancement of Science’s Scientific Freedom and Responsibility Award, and, in 2009, the John P. McGovern Science and Society Award given by Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research Society, for his work in scientific integrity and for gaining compensation for nuclear weapons workers. Dr. Michaels is the author of studies examining the health of construction workers, printers, bus drivers, and other occupations, as well as of numerous publications on science and regulatory policy. He is a graduate of the City College of New York, and holds an M.P.H. and Ph.D. from Columbia University. Aubrey Miller, M.D., M.P.H., joined NIEHS to serve as senior medical advisor and NIEHS liaison to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Miller’s office is located on the NIH Campus in Bethesda where he oversees a small staff of NIEHS employees who are readily available to meet with NIH and HHS representatives, federal partners, members of Congress, and other stakeholders to discuss how environmental factors influence human health and disease. A medical epidemiologist and a captain in the U.S. Public Health Service, Dr. Miller has longstanding experience, publications, and contributions to a wide range of occupational and environmental health issues and policies. Dr. Miller previously served as the chief medical officer for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Office of Counterterrorism and Emerging Threats. Previously, he worked as a senior medical officer and regional toxicologist for the EPA and for the HHS Office of the Secretary in Denver, providing leadership, expertise, and coordination for multiagency emergency responses, such as the Libby, Montana, asbestos situation, the anthrax attacks in Washington, DC, and Hurricane Katrina. He also conducted more than 30 field investigations while working for several years as a medical officer for CDC and NIOSH. Dr. Aubrey received his M.D. from Rush Medical College in Chicago and his M.P.H. in environmental and occupational health sciences from the University of Illinois School of Public Health. He is board certified in occupational and

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APPENDIX B 137 environmental medicine. He is a member of the American Public Health Association, American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, and American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists. Jennifer Orme-Zavaleta, Ph.D., has been with the EPA for 30 years, working in the areas of human health and ecological research, risk assessment, policy and regulation development, strategic planning, and program implementation. The focus of her experience includes the evaluation of risks to human and ecosystem health, and the influence of environmental change on human health in response to a variety of stressors, including synthetic organic and inorganic chemicals, radio- nuclides, microorganisms, and vector-borne disease. She has worked in the Offices of Research and Development, Pesticides and Toxic Substances, and Water. As interim national program director for Safe and Sustainable Water Resources, she led the realignment of the former drinking water and water quality research programs to form a holistic research program that maximizes responsiveness to the rapidly changing needs of the agency’s water program, regional offices, and other critical water resource partners and stakeholders. During her career, she has been involved with the risk assessment practices within the agency, and the national and international scientific community. As a member of the EPA’s Risk Assessment Forum Technical Panel she was one of several scientists who developed the Guideline for Reproductive Risk Assessment, Guideline for Implementation of EPA’s Cancer Risk Assessment Guidelines, and Guideline for Assessing Risk from Less than Lifetime Exposures. She has also served as the manager of the EPA’s Drinking Water Health Advisory Program, leading the development of more than 120 health advisories for inorganic, organic, pesticide, munition, and microbial contaminants. These assessments have been used by the World Health Organization to develop guidelines for drinking water quality and also serve as the basis for unreasonable risk to health determinations for U.S. public water supplies when regulatory violations occur. Bob Perciasepe, M.Pl., M.P.A., returned to the EPA to serve as deputy administrator—the nation’s second-ranking environmental official and the agency’s chief operating officer—with his appointment by President Obama in 2009. In this role, he continues a career spanning nearly four decades as one of the nation’s leading environmental and public policy figures. An expert on environmental stewardship, advocacy, public policy, and national resource and organizational management, Mr. Perciasepe is widely respected within both the environmental and U.S. business communities. His extensive experience includes service both inside and outside of government. He served as a top EPA official in the Clinton administration, appointed first as the nation’s top water official and later as the senior official responsible for air quality across the United States. Prior to being named to his current position, he was chief

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138 HEALTH IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF SHALE GAS EXTRACTION operating officer at the National Audubon Society, one of the world’s leading environmental organizations. He has also held top positions within state and municipal government, including as Secretary of the Environment for the State of Maryland and as a senior official for the City of Baltimore. Perciasepe holds a bachelor of science degree in natural resources from Cornell University and a master’s degree in planning and public administration from the Maxwell School of Syracuse University. Christopher J. Portier, Ph.D., joined CDC in 2010 as the director of the National Center for Environmental Health and Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Dr. Portier came to CDC from NIEHS, where he was the senior advisor to the director and a principal investigator in environmental systems biology. Formerly, Dr. Portier was associate director of NIEHS, director of the Environmental Toxicology Program at NIEHS, and associate director of NTP. Dr. Portier is an internationally recognized expert in the design, analysis, and interpretation of environmental health data. His research efforts and interests include such diverse topics as cancer biology, risk assessment, climate change, bioinformatics, immunology, neurodevelopment, genetically modified foods, and genomics. From 2000 to 2006, he managed NTP and developed a strategic initiative that is internationally recognized for its innovation. He has contributed to the development of cancer risk assessment guidelines for national and international agencies and has either directed or contributed significantly to numerous risk assessments. He led the U.S. evaluation of electromagnetic fields by national and international scientists, which was the first comprehensive review in this field. Dr. Portier directed efforts of the U.S. government to develop a collaborative research agenda with Vietnam on the health effects of Agent Orange in that country. He has just directed a multiagency review of research needs for the health effects of climate change for the entire U.S. government. He has served as an advisor to the Finnish Academy of Sciences on the Centers of Excellence Research Program, as a member of World Health Organization/International Agency for Research on Cancer scientific committees, and as a reviewer for grants for the United States, the European Union, and many other grant-sponsoring organizations. Dr. Portier received his B.Sc. degree (1977) in mathematics (summa cum laude) and his M.S. (1979) and Ph.D. (1981) degrees in biostatistics. He has authored more than 150 peer-reviewed publications, 30 book chapters, and 40 technical reports. In the past 5 years, he has given more than 70 invited lectures, many of them at international meetings. Allen Robinson, Ph.D., has conducted research examining the technical and policy issues related to energy and the environment. A current focus is fine particulate matter, from which 50,000 Americans are estimated to die prematurely each year and almost 70 million people in the United States are affected because they live in areas that violate the National

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APPENDIX B 139 Ambient Air Quality Standard. Atmospheric particles also have a controlling influence on Earth’s climate and degrade visibility. A major thrust of Dr. Robinson’s research is characterizing fine-particle emiss- ions from combustion systems such as diesel engines. Laboratory experiments using dilution samplers and a smog chamber have revealed a dynamic new picture for primary organic aerosol emissions, in which these emissions evaporate, oxidize, and recondense over time. These findings require updated approaches to measure and simulate emissions from combustion systems. His group is working to implement this revised framework into chemical transport models to investigate its implications on our understanding of urban, regional, and global air quality. This modeling has revealed a potentially important new source of regional oxidized and presumably hydrophilic organic aerosol. Work is ongoing to better understand the health consequences and climate effects of these pollutants. Dr. Robinson joined Carnegie Mellon in 1998 after working for 2 years as a postdoctoral fellow at the Combustion Research Facility at Sandia National Laboratories. He received his Ph.D. from UC Berkeley in mechanical engineering in 1996 and his B.S. in civil engineering from Stanford University in 1990. Dr. Robinson received the Ahrens Career Development Chair in Mechanical Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University in 2005 and the George Tallman Ladd Outstanding Young Faculty Award from Carnegie Mellon University in 2000. Deborah Swackhamer, Ph.D., is an environmental chemist with an emphasis in aquatic chemistry. She manages the University of Minnesota Water Research Center’s research and educational programs, including overseeing the Water Resources Research Institute grants program for the USGS and developing research and educational opportunities for the center. She is a professor of environmental chemistry in the University of Minnesota’s School of Public Health and holds the Charles M. Denny Chair of Science, Technology, and Public Policy in the University’s Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs. Dr. Swackhamer received her B.A. in chemistry from Grinnell College and her M.S. in water chemistry and Ph.D. in limnology and oceanography from the University of Wisconsin– Madison. Her research focuses on the chemical and biological processes that control the fate of toxic organic contaminants in the environment, environmental exposure, and risk assessment. Aaron Wernham, M.D., is the director of the Health Impact Project, a collaboration of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and The Pew Charitable Trusts designed to promote the use of health impact assessments (HIAs) and support the growth of the field in the United States. Dr. Wernham is an HIA expert who has led HIAs at the state and federal levels. He has conducted HIA training for, collaborated with, and advised numerous health and environmental regulatory agencies on integrating HIAs into their programs. Prior to joining Pew, Dr. Wernham

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140 HEALTH IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF SHALE GAS EXTRACTION was a senior policy analyst with the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, where he led the first successful efforts in the United States to formally integrate HIAs into the federal environmental impact statement process. Dr. Wernham also directed a collaborative state– tribal–federal working group on HIAs and, with this group, wrote HIA guidance for federal and state environmental regulatory and permitting efforts. Dr. Wernham received his medical degree from UC San Francisco, and a master’s degree in health and medical sciences from UC Berkeley. Board certified in family medicine, he previously served as clinical faculty in the UC Davis family medicine residency program at Contra Costa Regional Medical Center. Roxana Zulauf Witter, M.D., M.S.P.H., M.S., is an assistant research professor in the Department of Occupational and Environmental Health at the Colorado School of Public Health. She led a health impact assessment investigating potential health effects of natural gas development in a residential community in Colorado. She also led the development of a white paper and literature review of potential exposure-related human health effects of oil and gas development. Dr. Witter is co-program director of the Occupational and Environmental Medicine Residency and teaches the Occupational and Environmental Toxicology course at Colorado School of Public Health. Dr. Witter is board certified in occupational and environmental medicine and spent several years in clinical practice.