Click for next page ( 127


The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 126
Study Committee Biographical Information Mark A. Barteau, Chair, is DTE Energy Professor of Advanced Energy Research, Professor of Chemical Engineering, and Director of the Uni- versity of Michigan Energy Institute. Before accepting his appointments at the University of Michigan in 2012, he retired from the University of Delaware as Senior Vice Provost for Research and Strategic Initiatives and Robert L. Pigford Chair in Chemical Engineering. He was a National Science Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow at the Technische Universität München before joining the University of Delaware as Assistant Profes- sor of Chemical Engineering and Associate Director of the Center for Catalytic Science and Technology in 1982. He became Director of the Center for Catalytic Science and Technology in 1996. He has held visit- ing appointments at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Auckland, New Zealand. His research in surface chemistry and hetero- geneous catalysis has been recognized with numerous awards, including the International Catalysis Award. He was the founding director of the University of Delaware Energy Institute. He is active in the National Research Council, serving as cochair of the Chemical Sciences Round- table and as a member of the Chemical Engineering Peer Committee. He has also served on the Panel on Chemical Science and Technology, the Committee on the Review of Basic Energy Sciences Catalysis Pro- gram, and the Committee on Challenges for the Chemical Sciences in the 21st Century. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineer- ing in 2006. He received a BS in chemical engineering from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, and an MS and a PhD in chemical engi- neering from Stanford University. Y. Frank Cheng is Professor and Canada Research Chair in Pipeline Engineering in the Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engi- 126

OCR for page 126
Study Committee Biographical Information 127 neering at the University of Calgary. His research has focused on pipeline corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, erosion–corrosion, coatings, metal- lurgical microelectrochemistry, and defect assessment. Before joining the faculty of the University of Calgary in 2005, he was a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada postdoctoral fellow at the Nova Research and Technology Center and a research scientist at the Center for Nuclear Energy Research at the University of New Bruns- wick. He is a member of the editorial board of Corrosion Engineering, Science and Technology and has published more than 120 articles in refereed journals on corrosion and pipeline engineering. He is the sole author of Stress Corrosion Cracking of Pipelines, published by Wiley. He is also Theme Editor of Pipeline Engineering for the Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems developed under the auspices of the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization. He holds a BS in cor- rosion from Hunan University, an MS in materials engineering from the Institute of Metal Research from the Chinese Academy of Sciences, and a PhD in materials engineering from the University of Alberta. James F. Dante is Manager of the Environmental Performance of Materials Section of the Southwest Research Institute. In this capacity, he supervises 15 staff engineers and technicians involved in basic and applied corrosion research for the energy industry and the U.S. Depart- ments of Defense, Transportation, and Energy. Current programs include corrosion sensor research and implementation involving fluid- ized sensors, atmospheric corrosion sensors, and sensors for corrosion under insulation. His unit also conducts research on accelerated cor- rosion test methods and research to advance the mechanistic under- standing of corrosion processes in various industries. Before joining Southwest Research Institute in 2009, he was Senior Research Scientist at Luna Innovations and leader of the University of Dayton Research Institute’s group specializing in corrosion mechanisms, detection, and protection. He began his career as a materials research engineer at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. He holds a BA in phys- ics from Johns Hopkins University and an MS in materials science and engineering from the University of Virginia. H. Scott Fogler is Vennema Professor of Chemical Engineering and Arthur F. Thurnau Professor at the University of Michigan. He is

OCR for page 126
128 Effects of Diluted Bitumen on Crude Oil Transmission Pipelines internationally recognized for his research and teaching in chemi- cal reaction engineering in petroleum engineering, including reaction in porous media, fused chemical relations, kinetics of wax deposition, gelation kinetics, asphaltene deposition kinetics, remediation colloidal phenomena, and catalyzed dissolution. The Chemical Manufacturers Association honored him with the National Catalyst Award in 1999. He has published more than 200 articles in peer-reviewed journals and books. He is author of Elements of Chemical Reaction Engineering, which is in its fourth edition and is estimated to be used by three-quarters of all chemical engineering programs in the United States. He has received numerous awards from the American Society for Engineering Educa- tion, including the Dow Outstanding Young Faculty Award in 1972, the Corcoran Award for Best Paper in Chemical Engineering Education in 1993, and the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Chemical Engineer- ing Division in 2005. He earned a BS in chemical engineering from the University of Illinois and an MS and a PhD in chemical engineering from the University of Colorado. O. B. Harris is President of O. B. Harris, LLC, an independent con- sultancy specializing in the regulation, engineering, and planning of petroleum liquids pipelines. From 1995 to 2009, he was Vice President of Longhorn Partners Pipeline, LP, which operates a 700-mile pipe- line that carries gasoline and diesel fuel from Gulf Coast refineries to El Paso, Texas. In this position, he was responsible for engineering, design, construction, and operation of the system. From 1991 to 1995, he was President of ARCO Transportation Alaska, Inc., a company owning four pipeline systems, including the Alyeska Pipeline Service Company, which transports 25 percent of the crude oil from the North Slope of Alaska to the Port of Valdez. From 1977 to 1990, he held several super- visory and managerial positions at ARCO Pipeline Company, includ- ing District Manager for Houston and Midland, Texas; Manager of the Northern Area; and Manager of Products Business. At ARCO Transpor- tation, he directed the efforts of a team of corrosion engineers advising Alyeska on making repairs to the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System. He is a past member of the Board of Directors of the Association of Oil Pipe Lines and the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration’s Technical Hazardous Liquids Pipeline Safety Standards Committee.

OCR for page 126
Study Committee Biographical Information 129 He holds a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from the University of Texas and an MBA from Texas Southern University. Brenda J. Little is Senior Scientist for Marine Molecular Processes in the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) at the Stennis Space Center. Earlier she was a Supervisory Research Chemist, Principal Investiga- tor in the Biological and Chemical Oceanography Branch, Supervisory Oceanographer, and Head of the Biological and Chemical Oceanography Branch. During her 35-year career at NRL, she has made major contri- butions in identifying and understanding microbiologically influenced corrosion of marine materials, which has had a significant impact on a broad spectrum of Navy applications. Her research has been used to prevent and mitigate corrosion problems in seawater piping systems, fire protection systems, weapon cooling systems, helicopter interiors, and nuclear waste storage. She participated in a special U.S. Department of Transportation investigation of corrosion mechanisms in the Alaska North Slope pipeline. She is Assistant Editor of Biofouling, the Journal of Bioadhesion, and Biofilm Research. She coauthored (with J. S. Lee) Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion (John Wiley & Sons, 2007). She has published more than 80 journal articles, more than 100 papers in symposium proceedings, and more than 20 book chapters. Her publica- tions have earned her numerous NRL publication awards. She is a Fel- low of the National Association of Corrosion Engineers (NACE) and a recipient of the Navy Meritorious Civilian Service Award and Women in Science and Engineering Award for Scientific Achievement. She holds a BS in biochemistry from Baylor University and a PhD in chemistry from Tulane University. Mohammad Modarres is Minta Martin Professor of Engineering and Professor of Nuclear and Reliability Engineering and Director of the Reliability Engineering Program at the University of Maryland, College Park. His research centers on probabilistic risk assessment; uncertainty analysis; and the physics of failure mechanisms of mechanical compo- nents, systems, and structures. He has served as a consultant to several governmental agencies, private organizations, and national laboratories in areas related to probabilistic risk assessment, especially applications to complex systems such as nuclear power plants and pipelines. He has

OCR for page 126
130 Effects of Diluted Bitumen on Crude Oil Transmission Pipelines authored more than 300 papers in archival journals and proceedings of conferences and three books in various areas of risk and reliability engineering. He is a member of several journal editorial boards, includ- ing the Reliability Engineering and System Safety Journal, Journal of Risk and Reliability, and International Journal of Reliability and Safety. He is Associate Editor of the International Journal on Performability Engineering. He holds a master’s degree in mechanical engineering and a PhD in nuclear engineering, both from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. W. Kent Muhlbauer is Founder and President of WKM Consultancy, which provides consulting services on all aspects of pipeline design, operations, and maintenance with an emphasis on risk management. Clients include major U.S. and international pipeline operators, federal and state regulatory agencies, engineering companies, and insurance companies. Pipeline risk assessment techniques developed by WKM are in use by pipeline operating companies worldwide. Before forming WKM in 1995, he designed, constructed, and maintained pipeline systems for Dow Chemical’s Pipeline Division. He held a variety of engineering and management positions starting in 1982, including operations engineer, technology center specialist, pipeline and salt dome storage quality manager, control center supervisor, and regional operations and main- tenance manager. He is author of the Pipeline Risk Management Manual (Elsevier 1992, 1996, 2004) and author of numerous articles and papers on pipeline risk management. He is a frequent speaker and instructor at conferences, workshops, training sessions, and seminars on pipeline risk management and integrity preservation. He holds a BS in civil engineer- ing from the University of Missouri. Srdjan Nešić is Professor of Chemical Engineering and Director of the Institute for Corrosion and Multiphase Flow Technology at Ohio Univer- sity. Before joining the faculty of Ohio University in 2002, he was a Senior Lecturer in the Mechanical Engineering Department of the University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; Principal Research Scientist at the Institute for Energy Technology, Kjeller, Norway; and Research Scientist at Vincha Institute for Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade, Hungary. His exper- tise is in flow effects and erosion of pipelines, electrochemical corrosion,

OCR for page 126
Study Committee Biographical Information 131 computational and experimental fluid dynamics, and multiphase flow. He has authored more than 50 peer-reviewed journal articles on these subjects and more than 100 conference papers. He is a Fellow of NACE and has chaired numerous NACE technical sessions and conferences on internal pipeline corrosion and erosion. He is a member of the editorial board of the Corrosion Journal. He holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in mechanical engineering from the University of Belgrade and a PhD in chemical engineering from the University of Saskatchewan. Joe H. Payer is Chief Scientist at the National Center for Education and Research on Corrosion and Materials Performance and Research Professor of Corrosion and Reliability Engineering at the University of Akron. In this position he directed the University Corrosion Collabora- tion for the U.S. Defense Department’s Office of Corrosion Policy and Oversight. Before joining the University of Akron in 2009, he was Pro- fessor of Materials Science at Case Western Reserve University, where he directed the U.S. Department of Energy’s multiuniversity Corrosion and Materials Performance Cooperative for improved performance assessment for long-term disposal of spent nuclear fuel. His expertise is in materials selection, failure analysis, corrosion control methods, moni- toring systems, and degradation mechanisms. His research has focused on localized corrosion of highly corrosion-resistant materials, gas and oil pipeline integrity, the effects of manufacturing processes on the per- formance and reliability of materials in service, coatings and surface treatments, and hydrogen and materials interactions. He is a Fellow of the American Society for Metals International; a Fellow and Past Presi- dent of NACE; and a recipient of the American Society for Testing and Materials Sam Tour Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research, Development, and Evaluation of Corrosion Testing Methods. He earned a BS and a PhD in metallurgical engineering from Ohio State University. Richard A. Rabinow is President of the Rabinow Consortium, LLC, which provides economic and business consulting services to the pipe- line industry. He retired from ExxonMobil after a 34-year career with the corporation. At the time of his retirement in 2002, he was President of Exxon­ obil Pipeline Company (EMPCo), a position he had held M at EMPCo and its predecessor, Exxon Pipeline Company, since 1996.

OCR for page 126
132 Effects of Diluted Bitumen on Crude Oil Transmission Pipelines Before that, he was Vice President and Lower 48 Manager of Exxon Pipeline Company. He began his career at the Exxon Company in 1968, where he held several engineering and supervisory positions in refiner- ies. He rose to Executive Assistant to the President of Exxon Company, Baytown Refinery Manager, Manager of Corporate Affairs, Manager of the Environmental and Safety Department. He is a past Chairman of the Association of Oil Pipe Lines and the Owners Committee of the Trans- Alaska Pipeline System. He has served on the Transportation Research Board’s Committee for Pipelines and Public Safety and the Committee on Alaska’s Oil and Gas Pipeline Infrastructure. He received a BS in engi- neering mechanics from Lehigh University and MS degrees in mechani- cal engineering and management, both from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. George W. Tenley, Jr., retired in 2010 as President of the Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI). PRCI is the collaborative research and development program for the energy pipeline industry. He joined PRCI in 1999 after working as an independent consultant on pipeline integrity planning and as a strategic advisor on pipeline risk management for Battelle Memorial Institute. From 1989 to 1995, he was Associate Administrator for Pipeline Safety in the U.S. Department of Transportation. In this position, he was the senior federal official responsible for safety regulations governing the pipeline transporta- tion of hazardous liquids and natural gases. From 1976 to 1989, he was a senior attorney and then Chief Counsel for the Research and Special Pro- grams Administration. He began his career as an attorney for the Federal Aviation Administration and the Drug Enforcement Administration. He earned a BA in political science from the University of Maryland and a JD from the University of Maryland.