from multiple platforms such as computers, tablets, and smartphones, includes an audio capability so that a woman can ask specific questions concerning weight gain relative to her own weight status and receive advice from a clinician (http://resources.iom.edu/Pregnancy/WhatToGain.html). The infographic is a new type of product for the IOM, but it answers a need that women have for simple information that is relevant to them specifically and that is delivered in a highly appealing manner.

QUESTION-AND-ANSWER SESSION

Rasmussen opened the floor to questions. One participant noted that she has clients who are living in motels, cooking on hot plates, and putting food in a cooler outside because they have very limited refrigeration. A cookbook to help women in these circumstances would be very useful, she said.

Another participant applauded the development of the interactive infographic, noting that women in her state report that they really like self-directed educational tools, such as Text4Baby, which allow them to decide what questions to ask and what information to receive. They are then free to follow up with their clinicians on issues of particular interest to them.

REFERENCE

Sharma, A. 2013. How much weight should you gain when you’re pregnant? Presented by K. Rasmussen at Leveraging Action to Support Dissemination of Pregnancy Weight Gain Guidelines: A Workshop. National Academies, Washington, DC, March 1. Available at http://www.iom.edu/~/media/Files/Activity%20Files/Children/Dissemination%20of%20Pregnancy%20Weight/2013-MAR-01/3%20RASMUSSEN%20Session%20I%201.pdf (accessed June 12, 2013).



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