over the long term. The participant also returned to the issue of an early first prenatal visit, noting that even if a woman wants to see her obstetrician very early in her pregnancy, many practices will not see her before 8 or 11 weeks. There may need to be a culture shift on the medical side to convince practices to see women at 8 weeks or even 6 weeks. Another possible entry point for interconception care is through primary care providers, such as pediatricians and family practitioners, who may see postpartum women often in the context of well-child care.

Catalano thanked the presenters for their remarks and the participants for a stimulating discussion.

REFERENCES

Lawler, M. 2013. Presentation at Leveraging Action to Support Dissemination of Pregnancy Weight Gain Guidelines: A Workshop. National Academies, Washington, DC, March 1. Available at http://www.iom.edu/Activities/Children/PregnancyWeightDissemination/2013-MAR-01.aspx (accessed June 12, 2013).

Phelan, S. 2013. Presentation at Leveraging Action to Support Dissemination of Pregnancy Weight Gain Guidelines: A Workshop. National Academies, Washington, DC, March 1. Available at http://www.iom.edu/Activities/Children/PregnancyWeightDissemination/2013-MAR-01.aspx (accessed June 12, 2013).

Phelan, S., K. Jankovitz, T. Hagobian, and B. Abrams. 2011a. Reducing excessive gestational weight gain: Lessons from the weight control literature and avenues for future research. Women’s Health 7(6):641–661.

Phelan, S., M. Phipps, B. Abrams, F. Darroch, A. Schaffner, and R. Wing. 2011b. Randomized trial of a behavioral intervention to prevent excessive gestational weight gain: The Fit for Delivery Study. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 93:772–779.



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